Results 1 to 19 of 19
  1. #1
    The Dentist English Noodles's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Burning Down a Pikey Caravan
    Posts
    17,230

    Human Body Parts Found Inside Tiger Shark

    Two legs, two arms and a severed torso have been found inside a 12ft tiger shark in the Bahamas.



    It is not clear if the person was dead or alive when eaten by the shark



    The human remains are being identified by Bahamian police.
    According to assistant police commissioner Glenn Miller, they appear to be a couple of days old.
    It was not clear whether the person was dead or alive when eaten by the shark.
    Two fishermen caught the animal off the Exuma Islands and were stunned to discover the contents of its belly.
    Mr Miller said at least two people were recently reported missing on the archipelago.
    He did not rule out the possibility that the remains are those of a migrant whose boat might have capsised during a risky sea journey to Florida.
    Tiger sharks can migrate long distances and are second to great white sharks when it comes to attacking people.


    http://news.sky.com/skynews/Home/Wor...che_In_Bahamas


  2. #2
    Molecular Mixup
    blue's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Last Online
    09-06-2019 @ 01:29 AM
    Location
    54°N
    Posts
    11,353
    ''According to assistant police commissioner Glenn Miller, they appear to be a couple of days old.''
    whatever that means ,anyway can't the shark digest its hors d'oeuvres- a couple of arms and legs -in that time ?

  3. #3
    Thailand Expat superman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Last Online
    30-03-2013 @ 10:45 AM
    Location
    Somewhere over the rainbow
    Posts
    4,655
    Now there's a thought. America trains sharks to protect it's coast from migrant invaders.

  4. #4
    Thailand Expat
    BobR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Last Online
    25-05-2019 @ 12:56 PM
    Posts
    7,760
    Quote Originally Posted by superman View Post
    Now there's a thought. America trains sharks to protect it's coast from migrant invaders.
    No such thing as a fresh water shark. Most of the "wetbacks" swim across the Rio Grande River.

  5. #5
    The Dentist English Noodles's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Burning Down a Pikey Caravan
    Posts
    17,230
    Quote Originally Posted by BobR
    No such thing as a fresh water shark. Most of the "wetbacks" swim across the Rio Grande River.
    Bull sharks will live in fresh water.

  6. #6
    On a walkabout
    Loy Toy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Last Online
    Today @ 11:20 AM
    Posts
    28,488
    Quote Originally Posted by English Noodles
    Bull sharks will live in fresh water.
    We had a sick adult female Great White come 25kms up the Georges River in Sydney and the water there is freshish.

    They often swim into fresh or brackish streams or rivers to rid their bodies of salt water parasites but rarely eat in fresh water.

  7. #7
    The Dentist English Noodles's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Burning Down a Pikey Caravan
    Posts
    17,230
    This is interesting.

    Are There Freshwater sharks?

    Whether true freshwater sharks exist or not is still somewhat of an open question. There is no doubt that there are sharks that live in freshwater, but most of these species are really marine sharks that are able to migrate up into freshwater and live out their entire lives there. An example of such a shark is the bull shark which is notorious for wandering into freshwater and has been found over 4200 kilometers / 2,600 miles upstream in rivers such as the Amazon. Bull sharks also live in Lake Nicaragua and these sharks are often referred to as true freshwater sharks. Recent studies do however show that even if bull sharks can live for many years in Lake Nicaragua, they do not breed there and they need to return to the ocean to breed. The fact that the bull shark can live for prolonged periods in freshwater doesn’t really make it a freshwater fish as long as it can’t reproduce in freshwater. (Having to migrate from freshwater to saltwater or vice verse to breed is however not unheard of among fishes; the famous salmons runs do for instance occur when salmons migrate from the ocean to freshwater streams to spawn.)

    The ability of bull sharks and some other shark species to wander between marine and freshwater has been a mystery for a long time, especially since sharks even in saltwater have a higher salinity in their body then the surrounding water. Recent research carried out in Lake Nicaragua has shed some light on this mystery; sharks seem to be able to reduce their bodily sodium and chloride levels by excreting the excess salts via a rectal gland and thereby reduce the amount of bodily sodium and chlorideby 33%. They can also reduce the amount of urea in their body by 50% in the same way. This process makes them more adapted to freshwater, but they still have a much higher salinity in their body than the surrounding water which means that osmosis makes the body absorb a large amount of water. Sharks are believed to deal with this by extracting excess water from their bodies in the form of urine. The massive amounts of water that are absorbed into the body through osmosis will result in the shark producing up to 20 times more urine in freshwater than they would in saltwater. Scientists believe that the kidneys regulate this water excretion, and living in freshwater is probably putting a massive strain on a shark's kidneys. The kidneys – or the rest of the shark – do however not seem to be damaged by this extra strain since bull sharks have been known to stay in freshwater for up to six years without scientists being able to detect any negative effects to their health.

    River Sharks - True freshwater sharks?

    As mentioned above, there are no known instances of bull sharks breeding in freshwater.

    There are however other sharks that might be able to live their entire life in freshwater without having to migrate to marine water to reproduce. Most of these species are found among the river sharks.

    River sharks are the popular name for shark species from the genus Glyphis. This group of sharks that looks similar to whaler sharks (Carcharhinus) contains a total of 6 known species. All species are very rare and half of them are still waiting to be scientifically described and given a name. The fact that so little is known about these species and that they earlier often have been misidentified as freshwater bull sharks make it likely that even more species may be found in the future.

    River sharks are primarily found in Australia and Asia. The river shark group is currently comprised of the Ganges shark (Glyphis gangeticu) which is found in parts of India and Pakistan, the Speartooth Shark (Glyphis glyphis) that lives in New Guinea, on Borneo, and in Queensland, Australia, and finally the Irrawaddy River Shark (Glyphis siamensis). The Speartooth shark will however most likely be divided into several species in the future, since the different populations are quite dissimilar to each other.

    The abovementioned Irrawaddy River Shark (Glyphis siamensis) can be found in waters in the area surrounding Rangoon (Myanmar/Burma). This species was until recently believed to be a variety of bull shark but has since been declared a separate species belonging to the river shark group.

    There are also three not yet described species of river shark. (Possibly four, since specimens now have been collected from a part of Borneo where no river shark species are known to exist.) Two of these species can be found in Australia in river systems located in the Northern Territory, primarily in Adelaide River and Alligator River. The last (possibly last two) species has been found on Borneo.

    Some very young specimens of river sharks have quite recently been collected from freshwater and this which suggests that these sharks might be able to reproduce in freshwater, which would earn them the label true freshwater sharks. In addition to this, river shark species have never been collected from marine waters (although they have been found in slightly brackish water) which further suggests that these might actually be true freshwater sharks.

    It is difficult to obtain more information about the river sharks as they are critically endangered and only found in a small number of habitats, but we will hopefully be able to save these species from extinction and find out if they really are true freshwater sharks that can live there entire life and reproduce in freshwater. Future research might even show us that they, just like the freshwater stingrays of the Amazon, have lost the ability to survive in marine waters.

  8. #8
    Thailand Expat
    keda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Last Online
    17-12-2010 @ 12:06 PM
    Posts
    9,831
    Not sure about sharks except to off the intruders, but the USN used to train dolphins and I guess these could probably patrol large areas of US waters far more efficiently and cheaper than manpower/technology.

  9. #9
    Banned

    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Last Online
    03-06-2014 @ 09:01 PM
    Posts
    27,545
    Quote Originally Posted by BobR View Post

    No such thing as a fresh water shark.
    Nonsense. There are varieties of sharks that can adapt to fresh water and back again to sea conditions. You'll find these oddities everywhere. From Australia to China, South America to Africa.

  10. #10
    Days Work Done! Norton's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Roiet
    Posts
    30,285
    Quote Originally Posted by English Noodles
    Human Body Parts Found Inside Tiger Shark
    Many more instances of shark body parts found inside humans. Shark just evening the score a bit.

  11. #11
    Thailand Expat
    robuzo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Last Online
    19-12-2015 @ 05:51 PM
    Location
    Paese dei Balocchi
    Posts
    7,848
    People jump on rickety boats in Haiti and try to make it Florida via the Gulf Stream, which at its nearest point to shore in the southern US is just north of Ft. Lauderdale, between Florida and the Bahamas. They either go to the Bahamas, work as slaves there for a while and then come to the US, or try to make it to the coast of Florida, which is a bit more difficult for a poorly manned sailboat/dinghy. The boats are usually overcrowded and underpowered- quite often just drifting- and capsize and sink regularly. I'm sure people fall or get thrown off, too. In addition, if they don't manage to get out of the stream in SoFla or the Bahamas they are headed far out to sea and almost certain death.
    “You can lead a horticulture but you can’t make her think.” Dorothy Parker

  12. #12
    Love Thailand Carnwadrick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Last Online
    27-03-2019 @ 02:18 AM
    Posts
    1,290
    That is a great painting who is the artist?

  13. #13
    The Dentist English Noodles's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Burning Down a Pikey Caravan
    Posts
    17,230
    Winslow Homer, The Gulf Stream, 1899.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Gul...%28painting%29

  14. #14
    Thailand Expat
    robuzo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Last Online
    19-12-2015 @ 05:51 PM
    Location
    Paese dei Balocchi
    Posts
    7,848
    Quote Originally Posted by English Noodles View Post
    In a book about the sea I used to read when I was kid- that picture scared the crap out of me. Felt really sorry for the guy until I found out he'd made it. . .

  15. #15
    The Dentist English Noodles's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Burning Down a Pikey Caravan
    Posts
    17,230
    It's a great picture. First time I've seen it.

  16. #16
    Tax Consultant
    Thormaturge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Bangkok
    Posts
    9,892



    Is it just me, or is that shark wearing lipstick?
    Last edited by Thormaturge; 12-09-2010 at 02:30 AM.

  17. #17
    The Dentist English Noodles's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Burning Down a Pikey Caravan
    Posts
    17,230
    Quote Originally Posted by Thormaturge
    Is it just me, or is that shark wearing lipstick?
    No, it looks like the Shark is wearing it too.

  18. #18
    Thailand Expat
    kmart's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Last Online
    Today @ 11:20 AM
    Location
    Rayong.
    Posts
    10,675
    Quote Originally Posted by English Noodles View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by BobR
    No such thing as a fresh water shark. Most of the "wetbacks" swim across the Rio Grande River.
    Bull sharks will live in fresh water.
    Correct. Bull Shark | Deep Dark Water - Shark Attack Stories

    They are the #1 maneaters by a long chalk

    Bull sharks are the most dangerous and aggressive sharks bar none.

  19. #19
    Thaiguy
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Loy Toy View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by English Noodles
    Bull sharks will live in fresh water.
    We had a sick adult female Great White come 25kms up the Georges River in Sydney and the water there is freshish.

    They often swim into fresh or brackish streams or rivers to rid their bodies of salt water parasites but rarely eat in fresh water.
    Some rivers carry a large fresh current on top and a deep saltwater current underneath , The Hawkesbury river near Sydney is a classic example.
    I have skii'd in the fresh in the upper reaches but saltwater species of fish are caught up as far as Windsor and sharks have been sighted and caught at Sackville.
    The Georges River is similar , many years ago a female Tiger was caught at Lugarno after terrorising the area and eventually falling to a set line half pig bait attached to hook with chains run over 2 x 44 gallon drums anchored to trees ashore.
    This lady was "affectionally" known as Tiger Bill" until caught and identified by the press as "Tiger Lill"
    She was a shade over 18ft long - the shark in the opening picture is a "Tiddler" by comparison.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •