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  1. #1
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    dirtydog's Avatar
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    Japan - Almost 200 centenarians 'missing'

    Almost 200 centenarians 'missing' in Japan

    Japanese citizens are famous for their longevity

    Nearly 200 centenarians in Japan are missing, according to a national audit.

    The inquiry followed the discovery last month of the mummified remains of a man registered as being 111 years old.

    Among those missing are 21 people who would be older than the nation's current official oldest person of 113.

    There are more than 40,000 centenarians in Japan, according to government data, but the number of missing has raised concerns that the welfare system is being exploited by dishonest relatives.

    Sogen Kato was thought to be the oldest man in Tokyo - but when officials went to congratulate him on his 111th birthday, they found his 30-year-old remains.

    He had received about 9.5m yen ($109,000; £70,000) in pension payments since his wife's death six years ago, and some of the money had been withdrawn, reports said.

    Police are now investigating his family on possible fraud charges.

    Just days later officials discovered that Tokyo's reputed oldest woman had been missing for decades.

    At least 38 of Japan's 47 prefectures have started checking the whereabouts of people 100 years or older, Japan Today reported.

    Those unaccounted for include a 125-year-old woman whose registered address was turned into a park in 1981, the newspaper reported.

    Japan has one of the world's fastest ageing societies, with one in five over the age of 65.

    In the last 10 years the number of centenarians has more than tripled to 40,399 - 87% of whom are women, according to the latest government figures.

    But the discoveries have cast doubt on the accuracy of the numbers.


  2. #2
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    Probably just out wandering around. . .

  3. #3
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    that's an awful lot of senior moments

  4. #4
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    Aliens.

  5. #5
    I am in Jail

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    saw one of these old japs on walking street

    a bar girl want to love him long time

  6. #6
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    Japan is just coming around to realizing that the notion that Japan is a country that respects the elderly is baseless. Actually, historically the opposite is true. http://www.wikidoc.org/index.php/Ubasuteyama
    Ubasuteyama (姥捨て山 grandmother throwing mountain?) was a practice formerly performed in Japan, whereby an infirm or elderly relative was carried to a mountain, or some other remote, desolate place, and left there to die, either by dehydration, starvation, or exposure. The practice was most common during times of drought and famine, and was sometimes mandated by feudal officials.
    Ubasuteyama has left its mark on Japanese folklore, where it forms the basis of many legends, poems, and koans. In one Buddhist allegory, a son carries his mother up a mountain on his back. During the journey, she stretches out her arms, catching the twigs and scattering them in their wake, so that her son will be able to find the way home.
    A poem commemorates the story:
    In the depths of the mountains,
    Who was it for the aged mother snapped
    One twig after another?
    Heedless of herself
    She did so
    For the sake of her son
    This story made a strong impression on Albert Einstein during his visit to Japan in 1922. Shohei Imamura's film The Ballad of Narayama, which won the Palme d'Or in 1983, gave the practice international notoriety.
    The practice is discussed in some detail in Radio Lab episode #305 Morality. The segment "Fountains of Youth" discusses the modern Japanese perspective on aging.
    Ubasuteyama sometimes appears as a metaphor for contemporary Japan's treatment of the elderly, who are noted for their above-average suicide rates.
    Similar traditions exist in Korean, Yakut, and Mongol culture. This is sometimes presented by proponents of the Altaic theory as evidence of a genetic relationship between these cultures.
    “You can lead a horticulture but you can’t make her think.” Dorothy Parker

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