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  1. #1
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    Bangyai's Avatar
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    Huge ice island breaks from Greenland glacier

    An ice island four times the size of Manhattan has broken off from one of Greenland's two main glaciers in the biggest such event in the Arctic in nearly 50 years.

    Published: 8:44AM BST 07 Aug 2010

    The Petermann glacier on Greeland's northwest coast Photo: EPA

    The flow of seawater below the glaciers is one of the main causes of ice calvings off Greenland Photo: REUTERS

    The Nares Strait, about 620 miles south of the North Pole and between Greenland and Canada


    The new ice island, which broke off on Thursday, will enter a remote place called the Nares Strait, about 620 miles south of the North Pole between Greenland and Canada.

    The ice island has an area of 100 square miles and a thickness of up to half the height of the Empire State Building, said Andreas Muenchow, professor of ocean science and engineering at the University of Delaware.

    Mr Muenchow said he had expected an ice chunk to break off from the Petermann Glacier, one of the two largest remaining ones in Greenland, because it had been growing in size for seven or eight years. But he did not expect it to be so large.
    "The freshwater stored in this ice island could keep the Delaware or Hudson Rivers flowing for more than two years," said Mr Muenchow
    "It could also keep all US public tap water flowing for 120 days."
    He said it was hard to judge whether the event occurred due to global warming because records on the seawater around the glacier have only been kept since 2003.
    The flow of seawater below the glaciers is one of the main causes of ice calvings off Greenland.
    "Nobody can claim this was caused by global warming. On the other hand nobody can claim that it wasn't," Mr Muenchow said.
    Scientists have said the first six months of 2010 have been the hottest globally on record. The El Nino weather pattern has contributed to higher temperatures, but many scientists say elevated levels of man-made greenhouse gases are pushing temperatures higher.
    The ice island could fuse to land, break up into smaller pieces, or slowly move south where it could block shipping.
    The last time such a large ice island formed in Greenland was in 1962 when the Ward Hunt Ice Shelf calved an island.
    Smaller pieces of that chunk became lodged between real islands inside Nares Strait.
    In February, an iceberg the size of Luxembourg broke off in the Antarctic.

    Huge ice island breaks from Greenland glacier - Telegraph

  2. #2
    I am in Jail

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    Where are the pics of the polar bears stranded on the ice chunk?
    I hope our TD pal who works in Greenland is OK. Beggar. He's not posted for so long, I forgot his bladdy nik.

  3. #3
    loob lor geezer
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jet Gorgon View Post
    Where are the pics of the polar bears stranded on the ice chunk?
    I hope our TD pal who works in Greenland is OK. Beggar. He's not posted for so long, I forgot his bladdy nik.
    He'll probably turn up posting from mid Atlantic as soon as he runs into a usable wi fi connection

  4. #4
    I am in Jail

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    ^ Nah, he was on the West side, same as that iceberg. Geez...Dar...D something. Name won't pop up.

  5. #5
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    Dalton?

    Perhaps some of the nukes that the US Airforce lost up there will be in it.

  6. #6
    Gohills flip-flops wearer
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jet Gorgon
    ...Dar...D something
    Driftman?

  7. #7
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    As one polar bear said to the other, "There goes the neighbourhood"




    "Erik, isn't it supposed to be the birds that head South for the Winter?"
    Last edited by Thormaturge; 08-08-2010 at 08:04 PM.

  8. #8
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    that'll speed up the sinking and flooding of BKK in no time .

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by withnallstoke View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Jet Gorgon
    ...Dar...D something
    Driftman?
    Ey up, Son!

    The joys of a right click on a username, eh?

    Glad to see you're alive ***mond.

    Sorry to go off topic, but, i'll be out there permanently from the end of the year.

    <pm me>

  10. #10
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    http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/IOT...src=eorss-iotd

    Record Melting in Greenland during 2010

    Posted February 18, 2011

    acquired January 1, 2010 - December 31, 2010

    2010 was an exceptional year for Greenland’s ice cap. Melting started early and stretched later in the year than usual. Little snow fell to replenish the losses. By the end of the season, much of southern Greenland had set a new record, with melting that lasted 50 days longer than average.

    This image was assembled from microwave data from the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) of the Defense Meteorological Satellites Program. Snow and ice emit microwaves, but the signal is different for wet, melting snow than for dry. Marco Tedesco, a professor at the City College of New York, uses this difference to chart the number of days that snow is melting every year. This image above shows 2010 compared to the average number of melt days per year between 1979 and 2009.

    The long melt season primarily affected southern and western Greenland, where communities experienced their warmest year on record. After a warm, dry winter, temperatures were particularly high in the spring, getting the melt season off to a strong start. The early melting set the tone for the rest of the season, leading to more melting all the way into mid-September.

    When snow melts, the fine, bright powder turns to larger-grained, gravely snow. These large grains reflect less light, which means that they can absorb more energy and melt even faster. When the annual snow is melted away, parts of the ice cap are exposed. The surface of the ice is also darker than snow. Since dark ice was exposed earlier and longer in 2010, it absorbed more energy, leading to a longer melt season. A fresh coat of summer snow would have protected the ice sheet, but little snow fell.

    Melting ice in Greenland freshens the seas near the Arctic and contributes to rising sea levels around the world. It is unclear just how much melting ice from Greenland will push sea levels up, largely because the melting is occurring much more quickly than scientists predicted. Current estimates call for an increase of up to 0.6 meters by 2100.

    To see how this melting looked on the surface of the ice sheet, see Tedesco’s photos and video on the City College of New York web site.
    1. References
    2. IPCC. (2007). Climate Change 2007: Synthesis Report. Contribution of Working Groups I, II and III to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. [Core Writing Team, Pachauri, R.K and Reisinger, A. (eds.)]. IPCC, Geneva, Switzerland, 104 pp.
    3. Tedesco, M., Fettweis, X., van den Broeke, M.R., van de Wal, R.S.W., Smeets, C.J.P.P., van de Berg, W.J., Serreze, M.C., and Box, J.E. (2011, January 21). The role of albedo and accumulation in the 2010 melting record in Greenland. Environmental Research Letters, 6 (1).
    NASA Earth Observatory image by Robert Simmon, based on data from Marco Tedesco, City College Of New York. Caption by Holli Riebeek.
    "Slavery is the daughter of darkness; an ignorant people is the blind instrument of its own destruction; ambition and intrigue take advantage of the credulity and inexperience of men who have no political, economic or civil knowledge. They mistake pure illusion for reality, license for freedom, treason for patriotism, vengeance for justice."-Simón Bolívar

  11. #11
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    good2bhappy's Avatar
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    If this keeps on going Bangkok will be under water in a decade

  12. #12
    Thailand Expat Jesus Jones's Avatar
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    At last, some neutral reporting that doesn't suggest it's the end of the world.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by StrontiumDog View Post
    http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/IOT...src=eorss-iotd

    Record Melting in Greenland during 2010

    Posted February 18, 2011

    acquired January 1, 2010 - December 31, 2010

    2010 was an exceptional year for Greenland’s ice cap. Melting started early and stretched later in the year than usual. Little snow fell to replenish the losses. By the end of the season, much of southern Greenland had set a new record, with melting that lasted 50 days longer than average.

    This image was assembled from microwave data from the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) of the Defense Meteorological Satellites Program. Snow and ice emit microwaves, but the signal is different for wet, melting snow than for dry. Marco Tedesco, a professor at the City College of New York, uses this difference to chart the number of days that snow is melting every year. This image above shows 2010 compared to the average number of melt days per year between 1979 and 2009.

    The long melt season primarily affected southern and western Greenland, where communities experienced their warmest year on record. After a warm, dry winter, temperatures were particularly high in the spring, getting the melt season off to a strong start. The early melting set the tone for the rest of the season, leading to more melting all the way into mid-September.

    When snow melts, the fine, bright powder turns to larger-grained, gravely snow. These large grains reflect less light, which means that they can absorb more energy and melt even faster. When the annual snow is melted away, parts of the ice cap are exposed. The surface of the ice is also darker than snow. Since dark ice was exposed earlier and longer in 2010, it absorbed more energy, leading to a longer melt season. A fresh coat of summer snow would have protected the ice sheet, but little snow fell.

    Melting ice in Greenland freshens the seas near the Arctic and contributes to rising sea levels around the world. It is unclear just how much melting ice from Greenland will push sea levels up, largely because the melting is occurring much more quickly than scientists predicted. Current estimates call for an increase of up to 0.6 meters by 2100.

    To see how this melting looked on the surface of the ice sheet, see Tedesco’s photos and video on the City College of New York web site.
    1. References
    2. IPCC. (2007). Climate Change 2007: Synthesis Report. Contribution of Working Groups I, II and III to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. [Core Writing Team, Pachauri, R.K and Reisinger, A. (eds.)]. IPCC, Geneva, Switzerland, 104 pp.
    3. Tedesco, M., Fettweis, X., van den Broeke, M.R., van de Wal, R.S.W., Smeets, C.J.P.P., van de Berg, W.J., Serreze, M.C., and Box, J.E. (2011, January 21). The role of albedo and accumulation in the 2010 melting record in Greenland. Environmental Research Letters, 6 (1).
    NASA Earth Observatory image by Robert Simmon, based on data from Marco Tedesco, City College Of New York. Caption by Holli Riebeek.
    Nice update, SD! Thanks.

  14. #14
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    dirtydog's Avatar
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  15. #15
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    I'm all for Greenland melting being invested in Angel Mining, massively undervalued company for those that like a punt on small cap stocks.

  16. #16
    Molecular Mixup
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    I hope it all melts , the worlds oceans are filthy , they need some clean water to give them a good wash

  17. #17
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    I was up in Greenland for a month last year. We managed to get a night out on the piss, they were all chronic alcoholics and a woman with lobotomy scars pulled my mates trousers down and started playing with his willy..

    cheers

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