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  1. #1
    Balls to Monty
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    Dead man found in landing gear

    A refugee from the US Financial Crisis?

    This guy picked the wrong landing gear. Flight Delta 59 from the New York to Tokyo. He must have been in the gear bay for 12 hours to cross the pacific. No way he could make it. I would have thought the gear folding into the bay would likely sqaush a hanger on to death too.

    JAPANESE authorities have found the body of a man in the landing gear of a Delta airliner that arrived in Tokyo from New York.

    The man, who was of dark complexion and dressed only in blue jeans and a long-sleeved shirt, was carrying no passport or personal belongings.

    A mechanic found the body in the landing gear bay of the Boeing 777 after Delta Flight 59 landed at Tokyo's Narita International Airport at about 6:05 p.m. Sunday, a Chiba prefecture police spokesman said.

    "Doctors say he probably froze to death and that he suffered a shortage of oxygen at an altitude of more than 10,000 metres (about 30,000 feet)," said another police official, Narita airport station spokesman Yoshimi Ichihara.

    "We found no passport, no bag and no personal belongings. If he carried any luggage, it must have all dropped out when the airplane opened up the hatch of the landing gear bay above the ocean before it landed."

    Dead man found in landing gear | News.com.au

    Must take some balls to try leaping onto this


  2. #2
    Thailand Expat
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    Contender to the Darwin Award

    I believe even on a short haul he could not make it. Those jet planes fly on altitudes where the air is too thin.

    RIP

  3. #3
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    Begbie's Avatar
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    Wonder how long he'd been there.

  4. #4
    Banned Muadib's Avatar
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    Don't know how long he had been there, but he was dead in the first 30 minutes...

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Muadib View Post
    Don't know how long he had been there, but he was dead in the first 30 minutes...
    How long he'd been there as in how many times the jet had touched down before the body was found. It's unlikely that he was stowing away from New York.

  6. #6
    Banned Muadib's Avatar
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    I would dare wager that he stowed away in NY and was found in Tokyo... Checking landing gear bays for obstructions is part of every pre-flight checklist...

  7. #7
    Balls to Monty
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    Seems that it is a survivable journey if the trip is short.

    FAA spokesman Ian Gregor said in 2007, that since 1947, there have been 74 known airplane stowaway attempts worldwide. Only 14 of the individuals survived.
    Maybe he came from somewhere else. since security would be very tight at NY.

    On January 28, 2007, a 17 year old male from Cape Town, South Africa was found in the wheel well of a British Airways flight in Los Angeles, CA. He died from exposure as a stowaway on a previous flight and the body had not been immediately found. That flight had last been in Cape Town five days earlier, on January 23, 2007.
    Stowaway - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

  8. #8
    Banned Muadib's Avatar
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    For the average human, exposure to altitudes above 15,000 feet for 15 minutes results in hypoxia, followed by unconsciousness, then death by suffocation... Not to mention that the outside air temp above 30,000 feet is in the neighborhood of -50 F... It would take a hearty soul to survive those conditions, even if they had oxygen...
    Give a man a match, and he'll be warm for a minute, but set him on fire, and he'll be warm for the rest of his life.

  9. #9
    Have you got any cheese Thetyim's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Looper
    since 1947, there have been 74 known airplane stowaway attempts worldwide. Only 14 of the individuals survived.
    Wouldn't the earlier flights have been props, so flying at lower altitude and a lot more survivable ?

  10. #10
    I am no longer a Hostage

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    Quote Originally Posted by Muadib
    For the average human, exposure to altitudes above 15,000 feet for 15 minutes results in hypoxia, followed by unconsciousness, then death by suffocation...
    No Everest for me then

  11. #11
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    I have just checked flight altitudes. For very short distances the plane may go only up to 7000m app. 20000feet.

    That would be survivable for a VERY fit person.

    But that is only for very short distances. If you go 1000km the flight altitude would be about 10000m 30000feet. You cannot survive that without oxygen.



    Quote Originally Posted by helge
    No Everest for me then
    The early climbers all used oxygen. Climbs without oxygen were done only much later and with special adaption training.

  12. #12
    Balls to Monty
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thetyim View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Looper
    since 1947, there have been 74 known airplane stowaway attempts worldwide. Only 14 of the individuals survived.
    Wouldn't the earlier flights have been props, so flying at lower altitude and a lot more survivable ?
    Could be but seems there are medium and long haul Jet survivors too.

    There is, however, the occasional miracle case, none more fantastic than the tale of Fidel Maruhi. The Tahitian native lived through a 7-and-a-half-hour flight from Papeete to Los Angeles. When he was discovered, Maruhi's body temperature was just 79 degrees, about 6 degrees colder than what's usually considered fatal. Repatriated to Tahiti after his feat, Maruhi later said that he remembers nothing of the trip, having blacked out just after takeoff. (this was in 2000)

    Last December, a Cuban refugee named Victor Alvarez Molina made it to Montreal in the wheel well of a DC-10, enduring four hours in temperatures that dropped to minus-40 F. His saving grace was a leak in a compartment pipe, which seeped out warm air. The pipe also provided him a convenient lifeline to hold onto when the landing gear deployed. Unlike Maruhi, Molina was granted refugee status and now hopes to bring his family to Canada. Presumably in more comfortable circumstances.

    Do airplane stowaways ever survive? - By Brendan I. Koerner - Slate Magazine

  13. #13
    Thailand Expat
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    Was it Ethiopia years ago when refugees were holding onto the wings of planes to get out of the country, obviously none of them made it.

  14. #14
    Thaiguy
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    Quote Originally Posted by Begbie View Post
    Wonder how long he'd been there.
    Poor Beggar probably thought he was in Airasia business class - maybe missed the check in by 2 minutes.

    Great pic of the undercart - very interesting.

  15. #15
    Member Dick Farang's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Muadib View Post
    For the average human, exposure to altitudes above 15,000 feet for 15 minutes results in hypoxia, followed by unconsciousness, then death by suffocation... Not to mention that the outside air temp above 30,000 feet is in the neighborhood of -50 F... It would take a hearty soul to survive those conditions, even if they had oxygen...

    Bu**sh**, you do not die at 15,000 feet (= some 4,500 metres).

    I have been on the summit of the Chimborazo in Ecuador without any special equipment.

    Some Japanese tourists needed sherpa’s with oxygen cylinders.

    It was just cold and full of ice and snow, albeit nearly on the equator.

    (The Ecuadorians claim the Chimborazo is the highest mountain in the world.

    That is true when you count from the centre of the earth.

    Mount Everest is the highest mountain in the world when you count from sea level.

    If not convinced, read:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chimborazo_(volcano))
    Being a Dutch speaking Belgian from Antwerp City, I have retired in Pattaya with my young Thai wife, after an active professional life.

  16. #16
    Banned Muadib's Avatar
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    ^ Just quoting my FAA pilot training Dick... Anything over 12,500' for more than 20 minutes requires O2, over 15,000' O2 is mandatory for the stated reason...

    People react to altitude sickness at different rates... Where one person is fine at 15,000', another may pass out due to oxygen deprivation... Climbers, skiers and athletes generally have better circulation & lung capacity simply due to their training... 30,000'+ where these stowaways were in unpressurized areas of aircraft is almost always certain death... I'm amazed anyone has survived it...

  17. #17
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    I'm gutted, no finger pointing picture of a body!

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Looper View Post
    Seems that it is a survivable journey if the trip is short.

    FAA spokesman Ian Gregor said in 2007, that since 1947, there have been 74 known airplane stowaway attempts worldwide. Only 14 of the individuals survived.
    Maybe he came from somewhere else. since security would be very tight at NY.

    On January 28, 2007, a 17 year old male from Cape Town, South Africa was found in the wheel well of a British Airways flight in Los Angeles, CA. He died from exposure as a stowaway on a previous flight and the body had not been immediately found. That flight had last been in Cape Town five days earlier, on January 23, 2007.
    Stowaway - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    You fail to consider your quote is not specific - stowaways are not necessarily in the landing gear, but often in pressurized cargo holds.
    1/2 hour spent in landing gear past 10,000 feet is going to cause death to most other than seasoned climbers.
    No one has survived in the gear past island hops, perhaps.


    And you really think "security" is..... security at NY JFK, or anywhere else? Specially when soda and beer is served in tin cans, or glass.. and people are allowed pens and pencil, all very deadly weapons ....
    Isn't it possible to kill someone with a plastic bag?

    All kinds of potential miscreants have access the airplane, from cleaners to pet cargo loaders...
    Best way to stave off terrorism is to stop fighting dirty wars against an ideology.
    Last edited by MustavaMond; 11-02-2010 at 10:06 AM.



    Profiteering From War and Disease, Corporate Owned "News" Media Deliberately Dis-Informs in Order to Further Its Own Agenda- PROFIT

  19. #19
    DaffyDuck
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    Aside from the stupidity of such a stunt, I often wonder what kind of desperation drives people to such an act (aside from total ignorance of the risks involved).

    As for DickFarang who claims that his climbing to the top of Mt. Chimborazo in Ecuador (elevation 20,565 ft) 'proves' that altitudes above 15,000 feet are 'safe' and not lethal -- unless you climbed to the top of that volcano in less than 10 minutes, your anecdote means absolutely nothing as your body had opportunity to adjust, slowly, to change in atmospheric conditions during the relatively slow ascent. Stowed away in a wheel well, you'd pass out within 20 minutes.

  20. #20
    Balls to Monty
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    ^But you also would not be subject to physical exertion as a climber is so its swings and roundabouts.

  21. #21
    Balls to Monty
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    Quote Originally Posted by MustavaMond View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Looper View Post
    Seems that it is a survivable journey if the trip is short.

    FAA spokesman Ian Gregor said in 2007, that since 1947, there have been 74 known airplane stowaway attempts worldwide. Only 14 of the individuals survived.
    Maybe he came from somewhere else. since security would be very tight at NY.

    On January 28, 2007, a 17 year old male from Cape Town, South Africa was found in the wheel well of a British Airways flight in Los Angeles, CA. He died from exposure as a stowaway on a previous flight and the body had not been immediately found. That flight had last been in Cape Town five days earlier, on January 23, 2007.
    Stowaway - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    You fail to consider your quote is not specific - stowaways are not necessarily in the landing gear, but often in pressurized cargo holds.
    1/2 hour spent in landing gear past 10,000 feet is going to cause death to most other than seasoned climbers.
    No one has survived in the gear past island hops, perhaps.


    And you really think "security" is..... security at NY JFK, or anywhere else? Specially when soda and beer is served in tin cans, or glass.. and people are allowed pens and pencil, all very deadly weapons ....
    Isn't it possible to kill someone with a plastic bag?

    All kinds of potential miscreants have access the airplane, from cleaners to pet cargo loaders...
    Best way to stave off terrorism is to stop fighting dirty wars against an ideology.
    I also failed to consider that many stowaways would fall out undetected when the gear bay opens without warning which would make the survival rate stats even less appealing. What a fucker to grimly cling to life in -59c all the way across the atlantic and then fall 5000 feet to your death on the home straight coz nobody gave you a wake up call.

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