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  1. #1
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    San Diego menaced by jumbo squid

    San Diego menaced by jumbo squid



    Squid have come to the California coast before, like this one in 2005

    Scuba divers off the Californian city of San Diego are being menaced by large numbers of jumbo squid.

    The beaked Humboldt squid, which grow up to 5ft (1.5 metres) long, arrived off the city's shores last week.

    Divers have reported unnerving encounters with the creatures, which are carnivorous and can be aggressive.

    One diver described how one of the rust-coloured creatures ripped the buoyancy aid and light from her chest, and grabbed her with its tentacles.

    "I just kicked like crazy," diver Shanda Magill told the Associated Press news agency.

    "The first thing you think of is: 'Oh my gosh, I don't know if I'm going to survive this.' If that squid wanted to hurt me, it would have."
    Shanda Magill holds the buoyancy aid and light that the squid ripped from her

    The creatures - also known as jumbo flying squid - do not affect swimmers because they remain deeper in the water.

    But dozens have been washing up on beaches in the area.

    "The ones that we are getting right now have a big beak on them, like a large parrot beak," San Diego's Union-Tribune quoted John Hyde of the National Marine Fisheries Service as saying earlier in the week.

    "They could take a chunk of flesh off you."

    'Ram you'

    Diver and amateur underwater cameraman Roger Uzun said he swam with a group of squid for about 20 minutes.

    They seemed curious about him, he said, and appeared to be touching him and his wetsuit with their tentacles to see if he was edible.

    "As soon as we went underwater and turned on the video lights, there they were. They would ram into you, they kept hitting the back of my head," he told AP.

    It is not the first time the squid, which can weigh up to 45kg (7 stone), have taken up residence off California's coast.

    In January 2005 hundreds of them washed up off the coast of Orange County, to the north, and in 2002 a similar invasion was reported near San Diego.

    Scientists say they do not know why the squid - which usually live in deep waters further south off Mexico and Central America - have come so close in.

    But one expert, Nigella Hillgarth of the San Diego-based Scripps Institution of Oceanography, told AP it was possible that the squid had established a year-round population off California.








  2. #2
    splendid and tremendous
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    Quote Originally Posted by dirtydog
    'Ram you'
    What a way to go that would be.. being buggered to death by a big squid.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dirtydog
    and grabbed her with its testicles.
    They come up into the gulf of lower Calif. or Sea of Cortes as it is AKA and the fisherman make a lot of money from them, and they will bite you if they get a chance, but we bite them too as a calamari steak off one of them is a real delight, but they must be horny this year too.

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    ^^If thats your fantasy get a one way ticket to San Diego

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    You get 6 or 8 or those 40-50 pounders in the bottom of a 23 foot Panga and you got to be careful where you put your feet and stay away from their beaks.
    But they sure are good eating, Breaded calamari steak fried in Butter..

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    Breaded calamari steak fried in Butter.. !!!!!

    That brings back memories !

    Signature dish of the Rosa Nautica restaraunt on the end of the pier in Lima Peru !

    100% cholesterol - but who gives a shit !

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    Quote Originally Posted by blackgang View Post
    You get 6 or 8 or those 40-50 pounders in the bottom of a 23 foot Panga and you got to be careful where you put your feet and stay away from their beaks.
    But they sure are good eating, Breaded calamari steak fried in Butter..
    Are they? A cod boat I was on caught a northern giant squid on the long line, and the (seriously) crazy Japanese gaffers tried like hell to bring him into the hold. He was huge- maybe 12-14 feet long. They got pieces of him in, including one of the two long pods (legs) that the squid use to grab prey. I didn't know until I examined the pods that not only do they have suckers, but also claws, much like a big cat. Anyway, the pods and a big chunk of the body had very strong ammonia odor to them, and were quite tough and gristly. I assumed the Humboldt would be the same- does it need to be soaked in something to get the ammonia out?
    “You can lead a horticulture but you can’t make her think.” Dorothy Parker

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    No, they are the same as the sea arrows when it comes to meal time, we used to go down to the gulf when I lived in Ensenada to fish them and all the Mex fishermen from the lobster camps come down to fish them at the time they are in and make a ton of money.
    And now a friend has bought a bit of land has a 200 HP outboard Ponga and built a nice home at San Jose Del Cabo.
    But I am over here.

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    I did hear 5 swimmers have been lost to the giant squids so far. Sad part is that its going to take approximately another 2,000 years to get the rest of the bastards at this rate.

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    You are sure a REAL MENTAL GIANT, to make all these calculations,, how do you ever prove your calculations tho??

    But they do add so much to a thread.

  11. #11
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    Where's Godzilla? He could sort it out.

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    Must be caused by global warming.

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    I think the OP is a bit 'over the top' !!

    The things are in the sea - not marching through the city streets.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Happyman View Post
    I think the OP is a bit 'over the top' !!

    The things are in the sea - not marching through the city streets.

    At least not until the next John Carpenter movie.

    As a diver, the thing you have wonder about when you see a school of large fish is that there are always things following that eat them. This is true of the Humboldt squid as well- I recall reading a Nat'l Geo article about them some time back, describing catching these squid on steel shark line. They had a big one on the line at one point and were bringing it in, worried it would be attacked by another squid, when suddenly the line went dead; something had come along, snatched the squid and severed the line. Yikes.

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    There is nothing unusual about them being there, some years the warmer water moves a little onshore and Albacore tuna move close to shore,even as far north as the Columbia river, and the squids always come into Cabo San Lucas and as this year, the warm water is farther north which is not unheard of and happens quite often.

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    Quote Originally Posted by blackgang View Post
    There is nothing unusual about them being there, some years the warmer water moves a little onshore and Albacore tuna move close to shore,even as far north as the Columbia river, and the squids always come into Cabo San Lucas and as this year, the warm water is farther north which is not unheard of and happens quite often.
    There is supposed to be an El Nino event this year, maybe that has something to do with it. These squid are apparently going as far north as Alaska, and are possibly establishing resident populations off of California, so it may be something new.

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    Could be, there is strange things happening all over the world, and different things, and a lot has happened before, but I have lived a long time and so some things do seem strange to me tho.
    But climate change is normal, it has been happening all my life and I expect it to continue as this is not the first time between ice ages and we are not really sure what happens but we do know it does happen..

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    "New" in this case could just mean nobody remembers it happening before- it's a relative term. Climate change does seem to be a constant, even if man-made contribution- however that works out- probably is something new. Another constant- Earth abides.

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    I do not doubt that man has contributed to the speed of advance in global warming/Climate change, but he has not caused it as there is history of at least 3 ice ages in the past, and for 1 to follow another, there has to be a warming.
    As to most of it, the number of people on earth and the rate that they are using natural resources is bound to bring change, the rate at which the rain forests are being destroyed is bound to mean a faster change because of less rain and a lack of a cooling period and more rain on open and barren ground.
    More people on earth is causing the same effect as wiping your ass on a hoop.

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    Very true, But the world can not go on with that is happening, and it is happening because of population, without it we would still be doing shit as we did it when I was born and it didn't seem to have hurt to much then but the world and atmosphere were not overwhelmed with the small amount of pollution caused by a world population of 2.5 billion.
    There is no way that solar power will do what needs to be done, As far as I am concerned shut down all oil production, I can live without it, and I have lived where we were actually self sufficent as we raised everything we ate and needed except cloth for cloths and such things, but most can not do it and there is not room on the earth for this many people to do it either.
    well I been called to supper, so will check in in a bit.

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    Quote Originally Posted by blackgang View Post
    Very true, But the world can not go on with that is happening, and it is happening because of population, without it we would still be doing shit as we did it when I was born and it didn't seem to have hurt to much then but the world and atmosphere were not overwhelmed with the small amount of pollution caused by a world population of 2.5 billion.
    There is no way that solar power will do what needs to be done, As far as I am concerned shut down all oil production, I can live without it, and I have lived where we were actually self sufficent as we raised everything we ate and needed except cloth for cloths and such things, but most can not do it and there is not room on the earth for this many people to do it either.
    well I been called to supper, so will check in in a bit.
    Yes, it all comes down to population; all the other environmental problems today are pretty much subsets of that.

    Nukes and windpower look promising. I never quite understood why all the nuke plants had to be so big- why not build small ones like on aircraft carriers and park them offshore?

    Enjoy your supper.

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    I lived for awhile in Rainier Oregon close to TROJAN Nuke plant and worked on the dredges on the Columbia close to it and the main thing about them is the cooling water, they do not want it to contaminate the rivers or even the sea with heat from heat exchangers, so they use a lot of land for cooling lakes before it is sent back to the sea or what ever water they are using.
    The steam used to spin the turbines is cooled in the towers in pipes wrapped around inside the towers and the pipes are cooled with water from the ponds and runs down over those pipes, then is returned to the ponds and the water in the pipes is returned to the reactors and reheated and makes another cycle.
    I would imagine that on nuke plants used to make steam for propulsion is not isolated to one area that just heats that water, but soon someone will come up with the idea that it is what is causing the sea to warm up and cause El Ninos.
    I don't know if I am telling you something you already know or not, but it takes a hell of a lot of water to cool that much steam to make it work in a steam plant, be it nuke, coal, or oil fired.

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    Quote Originally Posted by blackgang View Post
    The steam used to spin the turbines is cooled in the towers in pipes wrapped around inside the towers and the pipes are cooled with water from the ponds and runs down over those pipes, then is returned to the ponds and the water in the pipes is returned to the reactors and reheated and makes another cycle.
    I would imagine that on nuke plants used to make steam for propulsion is not isolated to one area that just heats that water, but soon someone will come up with the idea that it is what is causing the sea to warm up and cause El Ninos.
    One of my best friends was a nuke tech on a sub (some guys tried to sneak off his sub and swim in to Pattaya- as he likes to mention when he tells the story, "submariners- definitely the cream of the crop of the Navy"), and told me that the reason they don't have to worry about cooling is exactly the reason that they take up so much space on land- you just use the ocean. I don't think there has ever been a meltdown on a US Navy ship, has there? They always say the power plant on a carrier (the US has what, 10 of these?) can light up a city- my thought is always, "So light up a fucking city already." What the fuck do we need so many nuclear powered supercarriers or subs for anymore anyway? Why not use one to power up Boston?

    Getting a long way from squid. My mom's house is about 20 minutes from TMI. I know what it's like to imagine that you'll never be able to go home because of a nuke cock-up, but I don't feel so threatened by the ones on ships.

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    Quote Originally Posted by robuzo
    "submariners- definitely the cream of the crop of the Navy"
    Kind words, thank you

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    Quote Originally Posted by panama hat View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by robuzo
    "submariners- definitely the cream of the crop of the Navy"
    Kind words, thank you
    Except maybe the ones who lose R&R due to a disciplinary measure, and then try swim in to Pattaya Beach from the sub. . .of course they didn't make it.

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