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  1. #1
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    Row over climbing at Ayers Rock

    Row over climbing at Ayers Rock


    By Nick Bryant
    BBC News, Sydney


    Uluru, also known as Ayers Rock, is a popular tourist draw

    A dispute has erupted in Australia over the issue of whether tourists should be banned from climbing Uluru, also known as Ayers Rock.

    It is one of the country's biggest tourist attractions.

    The national park which runs the site has proposed a ban for cultural and environmental reasons, supported by the local indigenous community.

    But the government in the Northern Territory says it is against a ban, which could hurt tourism.

    Uluru is Australia's most instantly recognisable landform, a stunning red sandstone rock that rises from the outback.

    For Aborigines, it is a sacred site, and the local indigenous community has campaigned for more than two decades to prevent tourists from climbing it.

    Aboriginal elders have likened it to scrambling over a Buddhist temple or the dome of St Peter's basilica in Rome.

    Signs at Uluru caution visitors not to climb, in deference to the sensibilities of the traditional owners, and because it is not that safe. Some 30 people have died climbing the rock.

    But now the national park is proposing an outright ban.

    The Northern Territory government does not support the full closure of rock, fearing its impact on a local tourism industry, which is already in the doldrums.

    But it is the federal government which will ultimately decide what has long been a contentious issue.


  2. #2
    Party Animal!
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    Nice of them to rename it after a Star Trek character.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by dirtydog
    Aboriginal elders have likened it to scrambling over a Buddhist temple or the dome of St Peter's basilica in Rome.
    Hmmm. I think that you can happily scramble over the remains of the Buddhist temples at Ayudhaya and the builders of St Peter's basilica thoughtfully included a route to the top for tourists when they constructed it.

  4. #4
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    For Aborigines, it is a sacred site, and the local indigenous community has campaigned for more than two decades to prevent tourists from climbing it
    It was there before they came along.

    It belongs to everyone.

  5. #5
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    Bastards wouldn't let me carry my surfboard up it. Would have won quite a few dollars in bets if they had.

  6. #6
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    Yet another golden opportunity for the PC to show how sensitive they are!! It is just a big rock in the midst of a vast arid expanse of landscape!!

    The whole of Australia has spiritual significance, lets just keep to the path and not walk on the grass.

    I was born and bred in Oz and Uluru/Ayers Rock has just as much significance to me as anyone else.

    As an Australian Citizen I would like to invite anyone reading this to climb the rock. Yes and do not forget to sign the guest book. Once you are there glance skywards and wave, you can be seen from space here. You may need to jump up and down so as to get attention.

    Please also feel free to picnic there as long as you remove your rubbish when you are done. Take photos and if you make it to the highest point please feel free to pass water and see how far you can get it to go before the stream runs out.

  7. #7
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    Garrett sets conditions for Uluru's closure
    Jennifer Macey


    Environment Minister Peter Garrett says it is unlikely Uluru will be closed to climbers in the next three years.
    (AAP)

    Though tourists to the red centre will be able to continue to climb Uluru for the time being, the Federal Government is working towards a ban on climbing the rock within a few years.

    The Government has approved a management plan for Uluru National Park that sets out a number of conditions that have to be met before the climb is closed.

    The tourism industry will have to be given 18 months notice before a ban is put in place, and Federal Environment Minister Peter Garrett says he expects the rock to stay open to climbers for several more years.

    The 346-metres tall rock Uluru, which stands higher than the Eiffel Tower, is visited by 350,000 people a year.

    Just over a third of tourists scale the rock each day, ignoring 'do not climb' signs put up by traditional owners urging people to respect the cultural significance of the site.

    Mr Garrett says a ban will be put in place only if certain conditions are met.
    The number of people climbing Uluru has to drop by half, from 38 per cent of visitors to below 20 per cent.

    The climb will also have to no longer be the main attraction for visitors to the Uluru Kata Tjuta National Park and there needs to be a number of other alternate experiences for tourists.

    The tourism industry has opposed a ban on climbing the rock, arguing the experience is still one of the main drawcards to the region.

    Peter Grigg, the general manager from Tourism Central Australia, says he is happy the climb will continue in the near term.

    "We surveyed our members and 80 per cent said that it should remain an open opportunity," he said.

    "But at the same time we're realists, knowing that the world changed.

    "In the event that the climb, if it ever does close, there are a lot of other activities and opportunities for people to come to Uluru Kata Tjuta and enjoy the experience that's being offered."

    Already the climb is closed for more than 300 days a year, due to extreme heat, windy weather and slippery conditions.

    More than 30 people have died attempting the climb.

    John Morse, the adviser to Parks Australia, will be helping the traditional owners developing alternative tourist experiences.

    "It's being done in a considered way; it's being done slowly," he said.

    "It will give the travel industry plenty of notice but it also is putting a greater emphasis on the development of new Indigenous experiences around Uluru Kata Tjuta.

    "It's essential to the Aboriginal people for their own economic development and it's also what the travelling public now wants."

    The chair of the Uluru Kata Tjuta Board of Management, Harry Wilson, has released a statement saying he is pleased Peter Garrett approved their plan.

    He says it will be good for the culture of the Anangu people and will hopefully lead to job creation.

    xxx.xxx.xx


    Peter Garrett



    freewebs.com

  8. #8
    or TizYou?
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    Just give the noisy natives a bucket of KFC..

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by TizMe
    Just give the noisy natives a bucket of KFC..
    I think they're called 'traditional owners' now.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by TizMe View Post
    Just give the noisy natives a bucket of KFC..
    I don't think KFC fry this stuff, not even for traditional owners

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by dirtydog View Post



    But the government in the Northern Territory says it is against a ban, which could hurt tourism.
    Total nonsense, this rock is iconic, world renowned, a silly climb ban will not deter tourists from visiting it.

  12. #12
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    The rock is one of the two most impressive natural objects I have ever seen.
    Flown over it many times, on one memorable occasion the Pilot circled it, always a beautiful sight.

  13. #13
    I am in Jail

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    How can we dance while the world is burning? Huh? Riddle me that.

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