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  1. #1
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    Ocean Infinity AUV finds Stellar Daisy’s VDR

    An Autonomous Underwater Vessel (AUV) deployed from Houston-headquartered Ocean Infinity’s deep-sea search vessel Seabed Constructor yesterday found the bridge and a part of the hull of the Stellar Daisy, the ore carrier operated by South Korea’s Polaris Shipping that sank March 31, 2017 with the loss of 24 of its crew of 26.


    The AUV retrieved Stellar Daisy’s Voyage Data Recorder (VDR) from the nearby seabed. It was put into de-ionized water and is being kept safe on board Seabed Constructor.

    A South Korean Foreign Ministry statement said that Ocean Infinity will continue its deep-sea search to find the Stellar Daisy’s hull and lifeboats, and to check the condition of the hull through underwater photography and carry out 3D mosaic reproduction.


    Ocean Infinity says the wreckwas located at a depth of 3,461 meters in the South Atlantic Ocean, approximately 1,800 nautical miles due west of Cape Town.


    Working from Seabed Constructor, the search operation involved the deployment of four AUVs which, over 72 search hours, explored approximately 1,300 sq. km of seabed. Representatives of both The Government of South Korea, who awarded Ocean Infinity the contract to conduct the search, and the families of Stellar Daisy’s crew, were present throughout the operation.


    Oliver Plunkett, Ocean Infinity’s CEO, said: “We are pleased to report that we have located Stellar Daisy, in particular for our client, the South Korean Government, but also for the families of those who lost loved ones in this tragedy. This operation is further testament to Ocean Infinity’s leading, technology led, search capability. Through the deployment of multiple state of the art AUVs, we are covering the seabed with unprecedented speed and accuracy. I would like to thank the Government of South Korea for their support, as well as all of the team onboard Seabed Constructor.”


    Many questions still surround the loss of the vessel. Stellar Daisy was originally delivered in 1993 as a single hulled very large crude carrier (VLCC), Sunrise III by Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Nagasaki Shipyard & Machinery Works.


    In 2006, Polaris Shipping Co Ltd, Seoul, purchased four single-hulled oil tankers, including Sunrise III, for conversion to very large ore carriers (VLOC) at Cosco (Zhoushan) Shipyard in China and the vessel returned to service in 2008 as Stellar Daisy.


    Last month, following a Coast Guard investigation, South Korean officials sought arrest warrants against the Chairman of Polaris Shipping and others involved with the conversion. Those arrests are apparently on hold pending the findings from the undersea recovery operations

    https://www.marinelog.com/news/video...ar-daisys-vdr/

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stellar_Daisy

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    at Cosco (Zhoushan) Shipyard in China
    Say no more.

    I'm sure the Polaris Shipping Company run a tight ship.

    Polaris Shipping

    One suspects the certificates of seaworthiness, signed off by the ships insurers were also from a Chinese company.

    Is Lloyds of London not around any more? Those were the days of security and warm blankets eh.
    Last edited by OhOh; 19-02-2019 at 08:26 PM.
    A tray full of GOLD is not worth a moment in time.

  3. #3
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    No-one's blaming the chinkies yet, calm yourself down man.

    It actually sounds like it was insured by the Koreans, I don't know if anyone would have re-insured without a proper survey.

    Stellar Daisy was originally built as a single-hull very large crude oil carrier at the Nagasaki Shipyard owned by Mitsubishi Heavy industries and was converted to a VLOC at the Cosco (Zhoushan) Shipyard in China in 2009. However, some insurance officials said conversion might not have caused the incident, as such a process would be carried out under class inspections. According to Korean Register, the ship had undergone an annual survey on August 12 last year. Asked by Lloyd’s List whether the vessel had undergone a condition survey by a surveyor in the last three years, the Korean P&I Club, which has provided protection and indemnity cover to the VLOC, declined to comment. In February, the China Port State Control authorities identified six serious deficiencies related to watertight and weathertight doors, indicating potentially leaking hatches or doors. Yet the vessel was allowed to sail without any detentions.Some market participants also suggested there were other possible causes of the vessel sinking, such as its age, loading stress, or uneven loading that can have structural effects on vessels which can cause damage to the frames and cause a hull failure.
    Stellar Daisy: What went wrong?

  4. #4
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    Yet....

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