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  1. #126
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    Has she got on her private jet back to China yet?

  2. #127
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    ^Nope...but she is out on bail.

    https://globalnews.ca/news/4749540/m...=notification/


    A British Columbia Supreme Court judge ordered that the Chinese telecom executive may be released under a number of conditions, including that she wear an ankle bracelet, surrender her passports, stay in Vancouver and its suburbs and confine herself to one of her two Vancouver homes from 11 p.m. to 6 a.m..


    Meng was released on $10 million bail — $7 million in cash and $3 million in sureties.

  3. #128
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    told you she was going to be released,

    she had 7 passport, which is impossible for Chinese citizens

    definitely a spy,

  4. #129
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    The Chinese CEO has been granted bail.

    One wonders if this decision was taken prior to goldilocks making the arrest "legally" political.

    Trade war hostage? Trump ready to ‘intervene’ in Huawei CFO case if it helps close deal with China


    "US President Trump said he might intervene on behalf of Huawei's CFO if it benefits US trade interests with China. Meng Wanzhou, whose bail includes strict conditions, faces extradition to the US and up to 30 years in prison.
    “If I think it’s good for what will certainly be the largest trade deal ever made – which is a very important thing – what’s good for national security – I would certainly intervene if I thought it was necessary,” Trump told Reuters. He has spoken with the Justice Department and Chinese officials about Meng’s case.
    On Tuesday, a Canadian judge granted bail to Meng, who was arrested 10 days ago while changing planes at Vancouver airport. She faces “multiple criminal charges” in the US, linked to alleged breaches of Washington’s unilateral sanctions against Iran.

    Meng’s bail, already steep at C$10 million including C$7.5 million cash, also included five sureties or guarantors. She is required to turn over all passports and travel documents and cannot apply for new documents. Additionally, she must be accompanied by a security detail when leaving her residence and is required to wear an ankle bracelet to ensure she does not leave her residence between the hours of 11pm and 6am."




    "

    Emily Rauhala @emilyrauhala

    If Trump said this, it goes against every thing we've heard from U.S. and Canadian governments this week. Would be a huge win for China, which has always argued that U.S. moves were political, not legal. #huawei"


    " Josh Barro‏Verified account @jbarro

    If I were the Canadians I would just release Meng after this comment. Why cooperate on a hostage taking?


    4:25 PM - 11 Dec 2018 "




    https://www.rt.com/news/446223-canad...ei-bail-china/

    https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2018-...7-surveillance

    https://uk.reuters.com/article/us-us...-idUKKBN1OA2PQ
    Last edited by OhOh; 12-12-2018 at 11:19 AM.
    A tray full of GOLD is not worth a moment in time.

  5. #130
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    So at least people can stop posting bollocks about her getting arrested on the plane.
    I politely remind you to read the Canadian extradition agreement.

  6. #131
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    Nice one. When's his bail hearing?





    Oh.
    Presumably after he has been placed in a dark cell, refused medical assistance, videoed whilst showering, placed under a heap of female prisoners and molested by dogs during their monthly "heat" cycle.

    The Chinese authorities are frantically trying to find a law they can charge him with. As we know China has laws going back millennia, it might take some time to find one or two that are suitable.
    Last edited by OhOh; 12-12-2018 at 11:25 AM.

  7. #132
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    So Trudeau makes a point of telling the chinkies that Canada's judiciary is independent.

    Baldy orange cunto tells them that if they do a trade deal with him, he'll fix the case.


  8. #133
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    A attempt to put this incident into some perspective:

    "In 2011, for example, JPMorgan Chase paid US$88.3 million in fines for violating US sanctions against Cuba, Iran and Sudan. Yet chief executive officer Jamie Dimon wasn’t grabbed off a plane and whisked into custody

    And JPMorgan Chase was hardly alone in violating US sanctions.

    Since 2010, the following major financial institutions paid fines for violating US sanctions:

    Banco do Brasil,
    Bank of America,
    Bank of Guam,
    Bank of Moscow,
    Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi,
    Barclays,
    BNP Paribas,
    Clearstream Banking,
    Commerzbank,
    Compass,
    Crédit Agricole,
    Deutsche Bank,
    HSBC,
    ING,
    Intesa Sanpaolo,
    JP Morgan Chase,
    National Bank of Abu Dhabi,
    National Bank of Pakistan,
    PayPal,
    RBS (ABN Amro),
    Société Générale,
    Toronto-Dominion Bank,
    Trans-Pacific National Bank (now known as Beacon Business Bank),
    Standard Chartered,
    Wells Fargo.


    None of the CEOs or CFOs of these sanction-busting banks was arrested and taken into custody for these violations. In all of these cases, the corporation – rather than an individual manager – was held accountable. Nor were they held accountable for the pervasive lawbreaking in the lead-up to or aftermath of the 2008 financial crisis, for which the banks paid a staggering $243 billion in fines, according to a recent tally.
    In light of this record, Meng’s arrest is a shocking break with practice. Yes, hold CEOs and CFOs accountable, but start at home in order to avoid hypocrisy, self-interest disguised as high principle, and the risk of inciting a new global conflict

    In light of this record, Meng’s arrest is a shocking break with practice. Yes, hold CEOs and CFOs accountable, but start at home in order to avoid hypocrisy, self-interest disguised as high principle, and the risk of inciting a new global conflict.


    Quite transparently, the US action against Meng is really part of the Trump administration’s broader attempt to undermine China’s economy by imposing tariffs, closing Western markets to Chinese high-technology exports, and blocking Chinese purchases of US and European technology companies. One can say, without exaggeration, that this is part of an economic war on China, and a reckless one at that.


    Huawei is one of China’s most important technology companies, and therefore a prime target in the Trump administration’s effort to slow or stop China’s advance into several high-tech sectors.


    America’s motivations in this economic war are partly commercial – to protect and favor laggard US companies – and partly geopolitical. They certainly have nothing to do with upholding the international rule of law.


    The US is targeting Huawei especially because of the company’s success in marketing cutting-edge fifth-generation (5G) wireless technologies globally. The US claims the company poses a specific security risk through hidden surveillance capabilities in its hardware and software. Yet the US government has provided no evidence for this claim.


    A recent diatribe against Huawei in the Financial Times is revealing in this regard. After conceding that “you cannot have concrete proof of interference in ICT [information and communications technology], unless you are lucky enough to find the needle in the haystack,” the author simply asserts that “you don’t take the risk of putting your security in the hands of a potential adversary.” In other words, while we can’t really point to misbehavior by Huawei, we should blacklist the company nonetheless.


    When global trade rules obstruct Trump’s gangster tactics, then the rules have to go, according to him. US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo admitted as much last week in Brussels. “Our administration,” he said, is “lawfully exiting or renegotiating outdated or harmful treaties, trade agreements, and other international arrangements that don’t serve our sovereign interests, or the interests of our allies.” Yet before it exits these agreements, the administration is trashing them through reckless and unilateral actions.


    The unprecedented arrest of Meng is even more provocative because it is based on US extra-territorial sanctions, that is, the claim by the US that it can order other countries to stop trading with third parties such as Cuba or Iran. The US would certainly not tolerate China or any other country telling American companies with whom they can or cannot trade.


    Sanctions regarding non-national parties (such as US sanctions on a Chinese business) should not be enforced by one country alone, but according to agreements reached within the United Nations Security Council. In that regard, UN Security Council Resolution 2231 calls on all countries to drop sanctions on Iran as part of the 2015 Iran nuclear agreement. Yet the US – and only the US – now rejects the Security Council’s role in such matters.


    The Trump administration, not Huawei or China, is today’s greatest threat to the international rule of law, and therefore to global peace."


    Meng arrest a huge provocation to China | Asia Times

    It looks like an attempt to interfere in a countries politics, rather than law breaking.
    Last edited by OhOh; 12-12-2018 at 11:13 PM.

  9. #134
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    Quote Originally Posted by misskit View Post
    North East Asia Senior Adviser, Michael Kovrig
    Definitely a spook then. No one leaves a nice cushy job working int he diplomat brigade unless they are reassigned by their real bosses


  10. #135
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    A attempt to put this incident into some perspective:

    "In 2011, for example, JPMorgan Chase paid US$88.3 million in fines for violating US sanctions against Cuba, Iran and Sudan. Yet chief executive officer Jamie Dimon wasn’t grabbed off a plane and whisked into custody

    And JPMorgan Chase was hardly alone in violating US sanctions.

    Since 2010, the following major financial institutions paid fines for violating US sanctions:

    Banco do Brasil,
    Bank of America,
    Bank of Guam,
    Bank of Moscow,
    Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi,
    Barclays,
    BNP Paribas,
    Clearstream Banking,
    Commerzbank,
    Compass,
    Crédit Agricole,
    Deutsche Bank,
    HSBC,
    ING,
    Intesa Sanpaolo,
    JP Morgan Chase,
    National Bank of Abu Dhabi,
    National Bank of Pakistan,
    PayPal,
    RBS (ABN Amro),
    Société Générale,
    Toronto-Dominion Bank,
    Trans-Pacific National Bank (now known as Beacon Business Bank),
    Standard Chartered,
    Wells Fargo.


    None of the CEOs or CFOs of these sanction-busting banks was arrested and taken into custody for these violations. In all of these cases, the corporation – rather than an individual manager – was held accountable. Nor were they held accountable for the pervasive lawbreaking in the lead-up to or aftermath of the 2008 financial crisis, for which the banks paid a staggering $243 billion in fines, according to a recent tally.
    In light of this record, Meng’s arrest is a shocking break with practice. Yes, hold CEOs and CFOs accountable, but start at home in order to avoid hypocrisy, self-interest disguised as high principle, and the risk of inciting a new global conflict

    In light of this record, Meng’s arrest is a shocking break with practice. Yes, hold CEOs and CFOs accountable, but start at home in order to avoid hypocrisy, self-interest disguised as high principle, and the risk of inciting a new global conflict.


    Quite transparently, the US action against Meng is really part of the Trump administration’s broader attempt to undermine China’s economy by imposing tariffs, closing Western markets to Chinese high-technology exports, and blocking Chinese purchases of US and European technology companies. One can say, without exaggeration, that this is part of an economic war on China, and a reckless one at that.


    Huawei is one of China’s most important technology companies, and therefore a prime target in the Trump administration’s effort to slow or stop China’s advance into several high-tech sectors.


    America’s motivations in this economic war are partly commercial – to protect and favor laggard US companies – and partly geopolitical. They certainly have nothing to do with upholding the international rule of law.


    The US is targeting Huawei especially because of the company’s success in marketing cutting-edge fifth-generation (5G) wireless technologies globally. The US claims the company poses a specific security risk through hidden surveillance capabilities in its hardware and software. Yet the US government has provided no evidence for this claim.


    A recent diatribe against Huawei in the Financial Times is revealing in this regard. After conceding that “you cannot have concrete proof of interference in ICT [information and communications technology], unless you are lucky enough to find the needle in the haystack,” the author simply asserts that “you don’t take the risk of putting your security in the hands of a potential adversary.” In other words, while we can’t really point to misbehavior by Huawei, we should blacklist the company nonetheless.


    When global trade rules obstruct Trump’s gangster tactics, then the rules have to go, according to him. US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo admitted as much last week in Brussels. “Our administration,” he said, is “lawfully exiting or renegotiating outdated or harmful treaties, trade agreements, and other international arrangements that don’t serve our sovereign interests, or the interests of our allies.” Yet before it exits these agreements, the administration is trashing them through reckless and unilateral actions.


    The unprecedented arrest of Meng is even more provocative because it is based on US extra-territorial sanctions, that is, the claim by the US that it can order other countries to stop trading with third parties such as Cuba or Iran. The US would certainly not tolerate China or any other country telling American companies with whom they can or cannot trade.


    Sanctions regarding non-national parties (such as US sanctions on a Chinese business) should not be enforced by one country alone, but according to agreements reached within the United Nations Security Council. In that regard, UN Security Council Resolution 2231 calls on all countries to drop sanctions on Iran as part of the 2015 Iran nuclear agreement. Yet the US – and only the US – now rejects the Security Council’s role in such matters.


    The Trump administration, not Huawei or China, is today’s greatest threat to the international rule of law, and therefore to global peace."


    Meng arrest a huge provocation to China | Asia Times

    It looks like an attempt to interfere in a countries politics, rather than law breaking.
    Sorry to tell you that all of your cutting and pasting was for nought, but she is not charged with violating sanctions.

    Meng, who also serves as deputy chairperson of Huawei's board, faces "serious charges of fraud involving millions of dollars" in the United States, according to the affidavit of a Canadian law enforcement official. She could receive substantial jail time if convicted, the statement said.

    <snip>

    She's said to have told financial institutions that affiliate Skycom was a separate company in order to conduct business in the country, when in fact it was a subsidiary.

    <snip>

    Meng is said to have made multiple false claims at a meeting with one of Huawei's banks in 2013. Though it's not named in court documents, Meng's lawyer said Friday the bank was HSBC (
    HSBC).

    <snip>

    HSBC is said to have cleared more than $100 million in Skycom transactions that traveled through the United States between 2010 and 2014.

    https://edition.cnn.com/2018/12/11/b...ils/index.html
    Do you understand now?

    It doesn't mean that they aren't "trumped up" charges, but they are different.

  11. #136
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    Quote Originally Posted by pseudolus View Post
    Definitely a spook then. No one leaves a nice cushy job working int he diplomat brigade unless they are reassigned by their real bosses
    They might do if they're told their next posting is Kabul or Sana'a.

  12. #137
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    ^^OhOh's list of banks probably committed billions of $$ in fraud as well. But they and their CEOs all skated except for maybe slap on the wrist fines in some cases.

  13. #138
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    Quote Originally Posted by SKkin View Post
    ^^OhOh's list of banks probably committed billions of $$ in fraud as well. But they and their CEOs all skated except for maybe slap on the wrist fines in some cases.
    I suspect the legal fine line is that they were corporations and she is an individual.

    And of course corporations get away with blue fucking murder all the time with nary more than a slap on the wrist.

  14. #139
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    A link to the legal documents, lodged in the Canadian court, documenting the Canadian and ameristani claims (in English,no French translation, which presumably is required by Canadian law :

    https://www.courthousenews.com/wp-co...u-EXHIBITS.pdf

    Many instances of past, with no time stamps, and "highly likely", present claims.

    More links to current and past allegations:

    https://www.motherjones.com/politics...ing-sanctions/

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-12-08/canadian-telecoms-face-1-billion-to-remove-huawei-tech-g-m


    Quote Originally Posted by SKkin View Post
    OhOh's list of banks
    The list is not mine, it's from the above posted link:

    https://www.refinitiv.com/content/da...fographic.pdf?


    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    I suspect the legal fine line is that they were corporations and she is an individual.
    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    Yet chief executive officer Jamie Dimon wasn’t grabbed off a plane and whisked into custody
    Similarly, I suspect Mr. Dimon would be considered, by most English speaking jury members, as a "human being" and an "individual".

    noun

    1A single human being as distinct from a group.

    ‘boat trips for parties and individuals’

    https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/individual

  15. #140
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    Similarly, I suspect Mr. Dimon would be considered, by most English speaking jury members, as a "human being" and an "individual".
    And perhaps had his name been "JP Morgan Chase" he would been arrested.

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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    And perhaps had her name been "Huawei" she could have been arrested.
    FIFY.

  17. #142
    lom
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    Many instances of past, with no time stamps, and "highly likely", present claims.
    Then shes guilty, the case is clear. Right Harry?

  18. #143
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    Quote Originally Posted by HermantheGerman View Post
    What's all the excitement about ?
    Are'nt chinese people used to getting locked up for "No Reasons"?
    Uuups sorry I made a mistake. Not only chinese people.

    Second Canadian missing in China after detention of former diplomat

    https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/asia/second-canadian-missing-in-china-after-detention-of-former-diplomat-11027830

    That's why every wealthy chinese has a escape route (property & houses) to the West.
    Just can't trust those communist bastards. Wadda say OhOh ?

  19. #144
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    Quote Originally Posted by lom View Post
    Then shes guilty, the case is clear. Right Harry?
    It's tiring having to keep explaining even simple things to stupid people.


    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    It doesn't mean that they aren't "trumped up" charges, but they are different.

  20. #145
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    Lest we forget, it's baldy orange cunto's fault that these two Canadians are now in detention.

    The idiot should never have said that he could use her as a bargaining chip. You would love to have him in a poker game, everyone would clean the dumb shit out.



    BEIJING, Dec 13 (Reuters) - Canadian Michael Spavor is being investigated in China on suspicion of harming China’s national security, a Chinese government news site said on Thursday.

    https://www.reuters.com/article/chin...Y5021?rpc=401&

    No doubt the forum sycophant who has been squealing about Meng's innocence will be convinced that he is absolutely guilty of the spurious charges the chinkies are throwing at him.

  21. #146
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    The list is not mine, it's from the above posted link:
    ok...fixed.

    Quote Originally Posted by SKkin View Post
    ^^OhOh's link to the list of banks that probably committed billions of $$ in fraud as well. But they and their CEOs all skated except for maybe slap on the wrist fines in some cases.

  22. #147
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    Do you understand now?
    Do you understand that the banks were trying to not be accused of breaking ameristani law by dealing with Iran, as ameristan had unilaterally placed sanctions against any dealings with Iran. As we have seen many banks have been fined for doing just that.

    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    Lest we forget, it's baldy orange cunto's fault that these two Canadians are now in detention.
    One Canadian is being investigated, the second has allegedly disappeared.

    The first an ex Canadian diplomat allegedly is working for an unregistered NGO. Thus he is in China illegally.

    Canada Has Chosen “Soft” Scenario for Ending the Huawei Crisis - Scholars

    "The decision of the Canadian court to release the Chinese top executive on bail was made public several hours later after Reuters had reported that former Canadian diplomat Michael Kovrig had been detained in China. He was Canada's Vice Consul in Beijing in 2014-2016; at the moment he works with the International Crisis Group.

    This gave the Western media and a number of observers an opportunity to suggest that China is acting according to tit for tat. Meanwhile, China's Ministry of Foreign Affairs has partially clarified this delicate situation. According to Foreign Ministry spokesman Lu Kang, the International Crisis Group isn't legally registered in China, and its employees are engaged in activities that violate Chinese laws.


    "If this person was engaged in some activity in China on behalf of the ICG, I can remind you and this organization, that according to my data, the ICG isn't registered in China. And if it's not registered in China, this means that its employees were engaged in activities that violated the Law on the management of foreign non-governmental organizations in the country, which was amended last year."


    Speaking about the detention of the Canadian citizen, the Chinese diplomat said that he didn't have any information on the matter."

    https://sputniknews.com/analysis/201...huawei-crisis/

    Let the facts be officially announced, rather than relying on Reuters jumping the gun, as usual.

    The second Canadian has not been announced by the Chinese authorities as being detained by them.

    I suspect they are checking all their terabytes of social media data to locate his whereabouts, using Google maps or some such "innocent" ameristani software app.



  23. #148
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    Do you understand that the banks were trying to not be accused of breaking ameristani law by dealing with Iran, as ameristan had unilaterally placed sanctions against any dealings with Iran. As we have seen many banks have been fined for doing just that.
    How hard is it?

    She has been arrested because she lied to banks.

    Now granted there are lots of naughty banks, but in case you didn't realise, in most countries law, two wrong do not make a right.

    So shut up about fucking banks breaking sanctions, it has nothing to do with the case against her.

    The focus now should be on which fucking arsehole blinks first: Baldy orange cunto or Winnie the Pooh.

    Although I know who my money's on.


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    Third Canadian citizen has been detained in China, Global Affairs Canada confirms

    "OTTAWA ― Global Affairs Canada confirmed on Tuesday that a third Canadian citizen has been detained by Chinese authorities, but did not connect the incident to Canada’s high-profile arrest last month of a Chinese tech executive.

    A spokesperson with Global Affairs said it was “aware of a Canadian citizen” who has been detained, but did not provide further details, citing the Privacy Act.

    The office did not suggest the arrest was linked to the arrest of Huawei Technologies chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou on Dec. 1, who was held by Canadian authorities at the request of U.S. officials.
    Since the arrest two Canadians ― Calgary-born entrepreneur Michael Spavor and former Canadian diplomat Michael Kovrig ― have been held by Chinese authorities."

    https://nationalpost.com/news/politi...anada-confirms


    Probably a visa overstayer. No idea what the National Post is.

  25. #150
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    All travelling agencies in China have been snowed under Canadian citizens booking on a short notice a flight out of the country.
    Some airlines are setting up special charter flights. Nobody can explain such a strange move...

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