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  1. #251
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    One would have assumed the two governments legal advisors would have made sure all the "Ts" were crossed and all the "Is" dotted, prior to incarcerating a person.
    Not something you normally associate with the chinkies, is it.

  2. #252
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    They should sentence her to death, that would be hilarious. Can you imagine how many feathers the chinkies would spit?

    US to formally seek extradition of Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou: Report


    • The United States has informed the Canadian government that it plans to proceed with a formal request to extradite Huawei Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou on allegations violation of U.S. sanctions against Iran, the Globe and Mail reported on Monday.
    • Huawei said it has no comment on the ongoing legal proceedings, while the U.S. Justice Department officials could not be immediately reached for comment.


    The United States will proceed with the formal extradition from Canada of Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou, Canada's ambassador to the United States told the Globe and Mail, in a move certain to ratchet up tensions with China.

    David MacNaughton, in an interview with the Canadian newspaper published on Monday, said the U.S. has told Canada it will request Meng's extradition, but he did not say when the request will be made. The deadline for filing is Jan. 30, or 60 days after Meng was arrested on Dec. 1 in Vancouver.


    Meng, the daughter of Huawei Technologies founder Ren Zhengfei, was arrested at the request of the United States over alleged violations of U.S. sanctions on Iran. She was released on bail last month and is due in court in Vancouver on Feb. 6.


    In a statement to CNBC, Huawei said: "We are aware of the report in question and are closely monitoring the situation. Huawei complies with all applicable laws and regulations in the countries and regions where we operate, including export control and sanction laws of the UN, US, and EU.

    We have every confidence that the Canadian and US legal systems will reach a just conclusion."

    Relations between China and Canada turned frosty after the arrest, with China detaining two Canadian citizens and sentencing to death a Canadian man previously found guilty of drug smuggling.

    The Chinese firm, the world's biggest maker of telecommunications equipment, said it had no comment on ongoing legal proceedings when contacted by Reuters on Tuesday. A U.S. Justice Department spokesman said, "We will comment through our filings.


    The Canadian Justice Department did not immediately respond to a request for comment outside regular business hours.


    Canada is one of over 100 countries with which the United States has extradition treaties. Once a formal request is received, a Canadian court must determine within 30 days if there is sufficient evidence to support extradition, and Canada's Minister of Justice must give a formal order.

    In an article published on Monday, a former Canadian spy chief said Canada should ban Huawei from supplying equipment for next-generation telecoms networks, while Canada's government is studying any security implications.


    Some of Canada's allies such as the United States and Australia have already imposed restrictions on using Huawei equipment, citing the risk of it being used for espionage.


    Huawei has repeatedly said such concerns are unfounded, while China's ambassador to Canada last week said there would be repercussions if Ottawa blocked Huawei.

    In Monday's interview, MacNaughton said he had complained to the United States that Canada was suffering from Chinese revenge for an arrest made at the U.S.'s request.


    "We don't like that it is our citizens who are being punished," the Globe and Mail cited MacNaughton as saying. "(The Americans) are the ones seeking to have the full force of American law brought against (Ms. Meng) and yet we are the ones who are paying the price. Our citizens are."


    Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau previously said China was arbitrarily using the death penalty and called on world leaders to raise concerns about the detained Canadians.


    —CNBC's Yolande Chee contributed to this report.

    https://www.cnbc.com/2019/01/22/huaw...port-says.html






  3. #253
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    The Chinese telecom company Huawei is at the centre of an increasingly tense standoff between China and the US.
    What began as a trade spat and grievances over corporate intellectual property theft has developed into a global standoff involving “hostage diplomacy”, death sentences and allegations of Chinese espionage.
    Huawei’s senior executive Meng Wanzhou, was arrested in Canada in December over allegations of sanctions violations and awaits extradition to the US. Meanwhile, three Canadians remain in police custody in China; one of them was sentenced to death this month. Washington, meanwhile, has said it will file a formal extradition request for Meng by the 30 January deadline.


    The US is reportedly investigating Huawei for stealing trade secrets while US lawmakers are calling for a ban on selling American-made chips and other components to the company.

    Last week, Vodafone became the latest company to flag concerns over Huawei, announcing a decision to “pause” use of the company’s equipment in its core mobile phone networks. Oxford University and the Prince’s Trust, Prince Charles’s charity, said this month they would no longer accept donations from Huawei.
    Huawei and its defenders have tried to paint the company as an innocent bystander, politicised against its will. Global Times editor Hu Xijin tweeted this month that: “By escalating its crackdown on Huawei, the US sets a bad precedent of applying McCarthyism in hi-tech fields. It deprives a hi-tech company of the rights to stay away from politics, focus on technology and market.”
    Yet, in many ways Huawei is used to scrutiny over its political associations. Critics point the finger at the possible connections between its founder Ren Zhengfei’ and the Chinese government.
    Ren, 74, a former engineer for the People’s Liberation Army, has been a party member since 1978 and was deemed one of 100 entrepreneurs who safeguarded “the leadership of the Chinese Communist party.”
    Huawei is also one of China’s so-called “national champions”’ referring to companies whose global expansion is considered in the national interest.
    Critics say Huawei’s rapid expansion is suspicious. Founded in 1987 and focused on selling telecom equipment in rural areas of China, it has grown into the world’s largest supplier of telecoms equipment and second largest smartphone maker. It operates in more than 170 countries, employing about 180,000 people.
    Others point to Huawei’s corporate structure, describing it as opaque. Huawei has long claimed that it is an employee-owned company, with Ren holding just 1.4% and the rest distributed among employees.


    “There are so many doubts about Huawei,” said Li Datong, an outspoken commentator and former journalist. “That Huawei is able to expand and hold a large share of the market has people wondering what other power there is behind the company? Everyone knows the answer,” he said.
    The US has been wary of Huawei’s state links since at least 2010, with the former head of the CIA claiming evidence of espionage – allegations that have not been proved. In 2015, when the company emerged as the largest supplier of networking equipment, concerns grew among US officials that Huawei-made routers and modems could be used to spy on Americans.
    This month, Ren went on a media blitz, breaking years of silence to say the company has never engaged in espionage on behalf of Beijing. “China’s ministry of foreign affairs has officially clarified that no law in China requires any company to install mandatory back doors. Huawei and me personally have never received any request from any government to provide improper information,” he said.
    Yet Huawei, like all companies operating in China, would have no choice but to supply information to Chinese security. China’s national intelligence law requires all organisations and individuals to “support, provide assistance, and cooperate in national intelligence work”. China’s counter-espionage law says all companies and citizens have to “truthfully provide information” and “must not refuse”.
    “The fact is, in China no single company can avoid this,” said Li. “You have to do what the government asks you to, no matter if you are state-owned or private. If you refuse, your business is over, so Huawei suffers from both sides, from the Chinese side and the democratic countries.”
    Outside China, Huawei’s troubles have morphed in recent months into an international web of allegations, threats and outright bans that would destroy a less powerful company.
    In the US, concerns have been compounded by hardening attitudes towards China in the Trump administration and Washington more broadly. US legislators introduced a rare bipartisan bill last week that would ban the sale of US chips or other components to Huawei or other Chinese companies deemed to have violated US sanctions or export control laws.
    “The United States government has basically declared war on Huawei and is using it as a proxy to push back against some of the ways the Chinese communist party operates,” said Isaac Stone Fish, a senior fellow at the Asia Society’s Center on US-China Relations.
    Concerns about Huawei’s relationship with the Chinese government have led US politicians and telecoms executives to call for banning Huawei from the rollout of the 5G network in the US, the next generation of the cellular technology.
    New Zealand and Australia have already moved to block the use of Huawei’s equipment as part of the 5G rollout citing similar concerns.


    In the UK, BT said in December it had removed Huawei equipment from parts of its network after the head of MI6 said it was time for the UK to decide whether it was “comfortable with Chinese ownership of these platforms”. Huawei has pledged to spend $2bn (£1.5bn) to alleviate those security concerns.
    Poland, where a Chinese employee of Huawei has been arrested on allegations of spying, has called on the European Union and Nato to decide whether to exclude Huawei from their markets.
    Even the Chinese firm’s sideline business in solar panels is under investigation. American politicians have claimed the firm’s panels “may pose a threat to our nation’s infrastructure.”
    An effective ban in the western world would be a blow to Huawei but it is likely the company can weather a fight with just the US. It still has its huge home market, South America and parts of Asia to fall back on. Other Chinese firms, including chipmaker ZTE, have run into trouble in the US, but the extent of Huawei’s woes is likely to chill the appetite of Chinese firms for the US market.
    Huawei has come under IP theft accusations before. US federal prosecutors are reportedly investigating allegations that Huawei stole trade secrets from US businesses.

    The investigation grew in part out of a civil lawsuit that starred a robot called Tappy. In 2014, T-Mobile filed a suit against Huawei in Seattle, accusing the Chinese firm of “theft of trade secrets, breaches of confidentiality and nondisclosure agreements” among other things. The telecom firm had spent years developing Tappy, a robot that uses a small, fast-moving finger to test and help improve handset quality, simulating human touch and adaptable to a range of devices.

    According to T-Mobile, Huawei instructed its employees to steal Tappy’s technology. One Huawei employee who was “continually peering into a security camera” tried to hide a stolen robot finger tip behind a monitor in the T-Mobile lab and then took the hidden part with him when he left.
    Huawei admitted two employees had acted inappropriately and said they had been fired but challenged T-Mobile’s claims that Tappy’s technology was secret, pointing out that video of the device in action was available on YouTube.
    In 2017, a jury sided with T-Mobile, ruling that Huawei had breached its contract and misappropriated its technology. But it did not award damages for stealing trade secrets and awarded the telecoms company a modest $4.8m (£3.6m).

    That investigation opened the door to a wider inquiry just as Donald Trump was gearing up for a trade war with China, one that made a political pawn of the already troubled Huawei.
    “The United States has the power, the desire and the allies to make Huawei’s life difficult not only in America but in other countries around the world,” said Stone Fish.
    He feels the real threat with Huawei may not be what it is doing now but the potential it has to act if tensions with the US and China really worsen. He said: “Because they are such an opaque company, we can’t trust them. We just don’t have enough information to give them the benefit of the doubt.”

    https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2019/jan/27/huaweis-problems-deepen-as-western-suspicions-mount
    "In my professional assessment as an intelligence officer, Trump has a reflexive, defensive, monumentally narcissistic personality, for whom the facts and national interest are irrelevant, and the only thing that counts is whatever gives personal advantage and directs attention to himself."

  4. #254
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    In less than 48 hrs. with no paperwork forthcoming, she walks.

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    Quote Originally Posted by russellsimpson View Post
    In less than 48 hrs. with no paperwork forthcoming, she walks.
    Poor old uhoh is going to have conniptions.
    https://www.theguardian.com/technolo...-secrets-fraud

  6. #256
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    Now we have very serious charges.

    ....................this ain't going away any time soon

    OTTAWA — United States justice officials announced criminal charges against Huawei Technologies chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou, confirming that a formal request for her extradition from Canada will be filed this week.
    The announcement late Monday afternoon came after Prime Minister Justin Trudeau fired his China ambassador this weekend for politically-charged comments about Meng’s “strong” legal case against extradition.
    Meng, Huawei Technologies, its main U.S. subsidiary and a “de facto subsidiary” in Hong Kong, Skycom, are subject to a 13-count indictment that includes charges of conspiracy, bank fraud, obstruction of justice and money laundering, among others, the U.S. acting attorney general, Matt Whitaker, announced during a press conference in Washington, D.C.


    ..Globe and Mail

  7. #257
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    Where are the days when The Guardian was called leftist and dared to publish Wikileaks?

  8. #258
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    Quote Originally Posted by russellsimpson View Post
    OTTAWA — United States justice officials announced criminal charges against Huawei Technologies chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou, confirming that a formal request for her extradition from Canada will be filed this week.
    We now have the definition of an alleged crime. Lawyers, start your engines. The farce continues, initially in Canadian courts.

    Does China have any decades old court cases they can recall and reactivate I wonder.

    Ex POTUS or their families, dead or alive, true or fake. I'm sure more than "abusing badge usage" can be dredged up from millennia of history which are currently covered by IP protection, abuse of status, gender inequality, racial, religous or just plain emotional torture.



    Was she coerced or was it a willing individual act?
    Attached Images Attached Images
    A tray full of GOLD is not worth a moment in time.

  9. #259
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    Huawei CFO to appear in Canada court on Tuesday

    TORONTO (Reuters) - Huawei Technologies Co Ltd Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou was set to appear in a Canadian court on Tuesday to discuss changes to her bail terms, according to British Columbia Supreme Court schedules.


    Canada arrested Meng on Dec. 1 at the request of the United States, which on Monday charged Meng and two affiliates with bank and wire fraud to violate sanctions against Iran.

    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-u...-idUSKCN1PM2O5


    Allegedly Meng wishes to change her Canadian leg bracelet for a "more comfortable" Chinese supplied one.

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  11. #261
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    We now have the definition of an alleged crime. Lawyers, start your engines. The farce continues, initially in Canadian courts.

    Does China have any decades old court cases they can recall and reactivate I wonder.
    They don't need to, they can just make some up like they usually do.

    Beijing (AFP) - Prominent Chinese human rights lawyer Wang Quanzhang was sentenced on Monday to four and a half years in prison for state subversion, sealing the fate of another attorney swept up in a 2015 crackdown.

    Wang, 42, who defended political activists and victims of land seizures, disappeared in the sweep -- known as the "709" crackdown -- aimed at courtroom critics of Communist authorities.


    Charged in January 2016 with alleged state subversion, Wang had been the last of more than 200 lawyers and activists arrested in the 709 crackdown to be tried or released.


    Wang was "found guilty of subverting state power, sentenced to four years and six months in prison, and deprived of political rights for five years," the Tianjin Second Intermediate People's Court said in a statement.

    After more than two years of being in legal limbo -- detained without a trial date -- Wang's court hearing took place behind closed doors in Tianjin on December 26.


    Read more at https://www.thestar.com.my/news/regi...cE92WsDWQlr.99

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    After more than two years of being in legal limbo -- detained without a trial date -- Wang's court hearing took place behind closed doors in Tianjin on December 26.
    Why they do not make it so transparent as some in the camp on a rented (forever) island (please no names here)?

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    It's up to the Canadian justice minister at this point. He could decide that the US case isn't strong enough and send Ms. on her way.

    That would be sure to Leave Canada very popular with the Americans.

  14. #264
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    Quote Originally Posted by russellsimpson View Post
    It's up to the Canadian justice minister at this point. He could decide that the US case isn't strong enough and send Ms. on her way.
    Can he?

    I thought he could only overturn dodgy convictions.

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    I'm sure.

    I was surprised myself.

    Many consider that Ms. Weng has a decent case.

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    Quote Originally Posted by russellsimpson View Post
    It's up to the Canadian justice minister...
    tststs

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    Quote Originally Posted by russellsimpson View Post
    It's up to the Canadian justice minister at this point. He could decide that the US case isn't strong enough and send Ms. on her way.

    That would be sure to Leave Canada very popular with the Americans.
    Talk about being stuck between a rock and a hard place.

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    That's where we are. Pretty much a lose/ lose situation.

    If the minister agrees with our southern neighbours position then Ms. Wanzhou will have to endure a long stay in her five million dollar sunny Vancouver home.

    At least a year, maybe even two.

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    It's ingrained in their culture now.

    FBI charges second Apple employee with stealing autonomous car secrets

    JEREMY HORWITZ@HORWITZ JANUARY 30, 2019 9:54 AM

    Apple’s autonomous car program Project Titan may be mysterious to everyone outside the company, but Titan engineers have access to thousands of top secret automotive files — a fact that has now led to another disturbing arrest. According to an NBC Bay Area report (via The Verge), the FBI has charged Apple employee Jizhong Chen with stealing Project Titan trade secrets before flying to China, where he had applied for a job with a direct competitor in the autonomous vehicle segment.

    Chen is accused of possessing confidential Apple manuals, schematics, diagrams, and photographs, including images snapped inside an Apple building, and “an assembly drawing of an Apple-designed wiring harness for an autonomous vehicle.” In some cases, the FBI says Chen tried to dodge Apple’s internal monitoring systems by taking photos of documents displayed on his own laptop’s screen. He came under suspicion after a fellow employee noticed him taking photos in a sensitive work space, and was arrested one day before his scheduled flight to China.

    The report marks the second time an Apple engineer was accused of bringing Project Titan secrets to a Chinese competitor. Last July, Xiaolang Zhang was stopped at San Jose International Airport after taking confidential files and items from Apple during a paternity leave, then buying a last-minute ticket to China. Zhang had been hired by China’s XMotors, an electric car company that later said it terminated his employment after learning of the investigation.

    Reports of industrial espionage by Chinese companies and the Chinese government have been widespread in the consumer electronics industry for years, but Apple’s issues are especially noteworthy because of its penchant for secrecy and still-unclear autonomous vehicle plans. “Apple takes confidentiality and the protection of our IP very seriously,” the company said in a statement. “We are working with authorities on this matter and are referring all questions to the FBI.”

    Chen faces a $250,000 fine and a possible 10-year prison sentence. His lawyer has thus far declined to comment on the charges.

    https://venturebeat.com/2019/01/30/fbi-charges-second-apple-employee-with-stealing-autonomous-car-secrets/

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    One wonders where Apple found a decent UI to steal from? A foreign company or a local one? Or is IP theft only relevant if it happened a year or so ago?

  21. #271
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    One wonders where Apple found a decent UI to steal from? A foreign company or a local one? Or is IP theft only relevant if it happened a year or so ago?
    So is that from your whackjob websites or a chinky propaganda one?

  22. #272
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    First hurdle cleared.

    Meng Wanzhou: Huawei chief executive can be extradited, Canada says

    Canada has said it will allow the US extradition case against Huawei's chief executive to move forward, but the court must make a final decision.

    The US wants Meng Wanzhou, Huawei chief financial officer, to stand trial on charges including fraud linked to the alleged violation of sanctions on Iran.

    Ms Meng was arrested in Canada in December at the behest of the US.

    China's embassy in Ottawa said it was "utterly dissatisfied" with the decision.


    They dubbed Ms Meng's arrest "political persecution" and called for her release.


    The high-profile detention has soured relations between China, the US and Canada.


    US authorities filed almost two dozen charges against Huawei, the world's second largest smartphone maker, and Ms Meng in January, along with a formal request for her extradition.


    The charges include bank fraud, obstruction of justice and theft of technology. Huawei and Ms Meng have both denied all the allegations.


    Canada's justice department had until Friday to decide whether or not the extradition case will proceed in Canadian courts.


    That decision is based on whether the request complied with the requirements of the US-Canada extradition treaty, and could not be refused if so.

    "An extradition hearing is not a trial nor does it render a verdict of guilt or innocence," the justice department said in a statement on Friday announcing it was authorising the extradition process in the case of Ms Meng to proceed.

    "If a person is ultimately extradited from Canada to face prosecution in another country, the individual will have a trial in that country."


    In a statement, Ms Meng's defence team said they were disappointed by the decision "in the face of the political nature of the US charges" and in the wake of comments made by the US president.


    Donald Trump has twice suggested he would intervene in the US Justice Department's case against Ms Meng if it would serve national security interests or help achieve a trade deal with China.


    "Our client maintains that she is innocent of any wrongdoing and that the US prosecution and extradition constitutes an abuse of the processes of law," they said.

    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-47423398


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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    Canada's justice department had until Friday to decide whether or not the extradition case will proceed in Canadian courts.

    That decision is based on whether the request complied with the requirements of the US-Canada extradition treaty, and could not be refused if so.

    "An extradition hearing is not a trial nor does it render a verdict of guilt or innocence," the justice department said in a statement on Friday announcing it was authorising the extradition process in the case of Ms Meng to proceed.
    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    First hurdle cleared
    As is now being broadcast regarding political pressure/influence on the ex top legal decision maker/person in the Canadian system on a different matter, one should not take this decision as "cleared", yet.

    Some background on "pressure" being applied by political appointees, including the Canadian PM, on to the now ex Canadian Attorney General, regarding her legal decision on another matter.



    Another "opinion" on this matter is available here:

    https://www.moonofalabama.org/2019/0...shed.html#more

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    Interesting, but irrelevant waffle.

    "She says that she believes that no law was broken but that Trudeau behaved inappropriately."

    I would think you would want Pepe le Pew to behave inappropriately in this case. He's already said he will not intervene.


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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    He's already said he will not intervene
    Sure about that?

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