Results 1 to 20 of 20

Thread: Paradise lost

  1. #1
    Utopian Expat
    Chittychangchang's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    13,349

    Paradise lost

    A fierce wildfire racing across Northern California has destroyed parts of the Sierra foothills, including one town, officials say.

    The so-called Camp Fire, which started early on Thursday near Camp Creek, has been fuelled by strong winds and dry forest.

    Some residents in the town of Paradise, which was "devastated", were trapped by the flames, state fire officials said.

    Thousands in the region have evacuated, including from schools and hospitals.

    There are unconfirmed reports of casualties, which an official said could take days to confirm.

    "[Paradise] is devastated, everything is destroyed. There's nothing left standing," said Scott Maclean, the state's forestry and fire protection spokesman.

    Watch: The long battle against California wildfires
    Eight images that reveal scale of California devastation
    Watch: Why California wildfires are so deadly
    Are you in the area or have you been evacuated? If it's safe to share your experiences then please email haveyoursay@bbc.co.uk .
    The Camp Fire had burned through 20,000 acres as of Thursday afternoon, local time, according to California Fire officials.

    As winds approached 50mph (80km/h), causing the fire to grow rapidly in just a few hours, some residents were forced to abandon vehicles and escape on foot, local media reported.

    Further south in Ventura County near Los Angeles, strong winds are preventing efforts to tackle another massive blaze - a few miles from the scene of a mass shooting in Thousands Oaks that claimed 12 lives on Wednesday .

    The second wildfire is said to have scorched 10,000 acres, according to officials.

    Image copyright REUTERS A group of U.S. Forest Service firefighters monitor a back fire while battling to save homes at the Camp Fire in Paradise


    https://www.google.co.uk/amp/s/www.b...anada-46146354

  2. #2
    Thailand Expat
    aging one's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 10:19 PM
    Posts
    16,793
    Just east of where I went to university. Last year friends lost houses in the Sonoma Napa fire, this year more. Paradise is/was a beautiful little town about 1,000 meters up in the mountain foothills.

  3. #3
    fat cnut SKkin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    AYCE buffet
    Posts
    6,901

  4. #4
    CCBW
    JPPR2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Here
    Posts
    5,806
    Friends and my parents are sending me pics of the heavy smoke in Northern California. Really quite sad to hear its burning again. There has been little to no rain for a long time so the entire area is like a box of kindling.

  5. #5
    fat cnut SKkin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    AYCE buffet
    Posts
    6,901
    ^^ I wonder if thinks the hard hat will protect him from fire...

  6. #6
    Thailand Expat
    Klondyke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 10:53 PM
    Posts
    4,867
    Quote Originally Posted by Chittychangchang View Post
    Why California wildfires are so deadly
    One could ask why - when the wildfires are so deadly - when almost all the dwelling are made all of wood - and again will be built so?

  7. #7
    CCBW
    JPPR2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Here
    Posts
    5,806
    Most of the wildfires are in mountain regions where people have homes nestled in and amongst the trees. While beautiful and serene the risk is always present. I owned a cabin for years up in the Sierra's. A new ordinance came out shortly after I sold it that mandated that all trees, shrubs and grass had to be cleared 25 yards from ones home. Of course no one complied and it was never enforced. I sure hope a fire never breaks out up by Lake Almanor. I have numerous friends that have places up there and some have trees as part of their decks etc.

    To Klondyke's point, Yes they are all made of wood and most have old shake roofs (Wood Shingles) that are like matches. One ember and see ya

  8. #8
    Thailand Expat
    Klondyke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 10:53 PM
    Posts
    4,867
    ^Wondering whether there is still another developed country in the world (except Canada) where they build their houses like that? (even where the wildfires are not so common)

  9. #9
    Thailand Expat cyrille's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 10:36 PM
    Posts
    16,093
    Always looking for an anti-west angle, eh dyke?

  10. #10
    CCBW
    JPPR2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Here
    Posts
    5,806
    My Pop just pinged me...8 dead and over 100 homes and businesses torched. Smoke is moving in a southerly direction and my friends can see the haze in San Jose.

  11. #11
    Thailand Expat
    Klondyke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 10:53 PM
    Posts
    4,867
    Quote Originally Posted by cyrille View Post
    Always looking for an anti-west angle, eh dyke?
    What's your nonsense remark?

    Isn't it strange enough that in the richest country of the world where so many wildfires and hurricanes come every year the majority of private houses are constructed by studs 3"x1.5" covered by chipboards?

    Do you have a plausible explanation for keeping this construction style that costs every year bilions $ of damages and losses of lives and properties besides the permanent nightmares for the families?

  12. #12
    Thailand Expat jabir's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    8,476
    Quote Originally Posted by JPPR2 View Post
    Most of the wildfires are in mountain regions where people have homes nestled in and amongst the trees. While beautiful and serene the risk is always present. I owned a cabin for years up in the Sierra's. A new ordinance came out shortly after I sold it that mandated that all trees, shrubs and grass had to be cleared 25 yards from ones home. Of course no one complied and it was never enforced. I sure hope a fire never breaks out up by Lake Almanor. I have numerous friends that have places up there and some have trees as part of their decks etc.

    To Klondyke's point, Yes they are all made of wood and most have old shake roofs (Wood Shingles) that are like matches. One ember and see ya
    Just a lay opinion and probably wrong otherwise it would be routine for the urbanites, but surely if you have a cabin in the middle of dense forest it makes sense to clear the immediate area in case of fire, without really affecting the feelgood factor since what you want is still there but a few yards further afield. And a clearing should also provide better security.

  13. #13
    Thailand Expat jabir's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    8,476
    Quote Originally Posted by Klondyke View Post
    What's your nonsense remark?

    Isn't it strange enough that in the richest country of the world where so many wildfires and hurricanes come every year the majority of private houses are constructed by studs 3"x1.5" covered by chipboards?

    Do you have a plausible explanation for keeping this construction style that costs every year bilions $ of damages and losses of lives and properties besides the permanent nightmares for the families?
    No dafter than building an airbase or one of the world's most populated cities within spitting distance of a dormant volcano, or a major city on a fault line that everyone knows will one day result in bigtime grief, or dozens of cities and highly populated zones around the world that Nature will one day reclaim. Ever wondered what's under Yellowstone?

  14. #14
    CCBW
    JPPR2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Here
    Posts
    5,806
    Quote Originally Posted by Klondyke View Post
    Isn't it strange enough that in the richest country of the world where so many wildfires and hurricanes come every year the majority of private houses are constructed by studs 3"x1.5" covered by chipboards?
    It is really bad nowadays. Up to about 1950 or so many houses (Pacific West coast) used redwood studs that were a true 2"x 4" with true 1" thick flooring. Now it is junk pine studs that are 1.5" x 3" and particle board/press board everywhere. Its all about economics. Wood shingles and wood siding should be banned in high risk fire regions IMHO

  15. #15
    CCBW
    JPPR2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Here
    Posts
    5,806
    Quote Originally Posted by jabir View Post
    Just a lay opinion and probably wrong otherwise it would be routine for the urbanites, but surely if you have a cabin in the middle of dense forest it makes sense to clear the immediate area in case of fire, without really affecting the feelgood factor since what you want is still there but a few yards further afield. And a clearing should also provide better security.
    Mine place was on about an acre and a half. What I really liked about it, was it had three 70 year old plus California Oak trees on the lot and two were 10 to 15 yards away from the house. The deck had a view of the valley. I kept my property free of shrubs and leaves but no way I would ever cut those trees down. We had 3 or 4 big grey squirrel families living in a few of them and they would walk right up to you on the deck and hang out and my daughters would feed them. Also had at least 6 Acorn woodpeckers that I would watch pound their head against the tree for hours while I sipped a cocktail BBQing.

  16. #16
    Thailand Expat
    aging one's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 10:19 PM
    Posts
    16,793
    Just got the sad news my friends in Paradise did lose their home of 27 years. Raised two kids in that mountain home on 2 acres. Everything save one car is gone. Nothing left. The fire department reported even their safe melted. Second friend wiped out by fire in the last two years.. Literally beyond belief..

  17. #17
    Thailand Expat jabir's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    8,476
    Quote Originally Posted by JPPR2 View Post
    Mine place was on about an acre and a half. What I really liked about it, was it had three 70 year old plus California Oak trees on the lot and two were 10 to 15 yards away from the house. The deck had a view of the valley. I kept my property free of shrubs and leaves but no way I would ever cut those trees down. We had 3 or 4 big grey squirrel families living in a few of them and they would walk right up to you on the deck and hang out and my daughters would feed them. Also had at least 6 Acorn woodpeckers that I would watch pound their head against the tree for hours while I sipped a cocktail BBQing.
    Must be a great life once you get used to it, and I guess most people living in the wilderness were either weaned on it or had enough of concrete and fumes. I lived in trees for a year in the hippy days, couldn't hack it for life but still envy those that do.

  18. #18
    CCBW
    JPPR2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Here
    Posts
    5,806
    Quote Originally Posted by jabir View Post
    Must be a great life once you get used to it, and I guess most people living in the wilderness were either weaned on it or had enough of concrete and fumes. I lived in trees for a year in the hippy days, couldn't hack it for life but still envy those that do.
    I grew up in the Santa Cruz mountains. AWESOME area for a kid growing up. Our house was on 3 acres but backed up against 1,000 acres or more of BLM land. Used to go ride dirt bikes, Hunt, Hike, mess around. It was endless what one could do. Were also close to a river that had Steelhead run up it every year. Used to catch some real beauties. Later of course I left it for city life and work. I bought the cabin as a retreat to keep me close to living in the mountains. Probably why I really like northern Thailand so much. My BIL, SIL and Niece are here from BKK for 4 days. BIL and I just went on a blaze around the area on the Honda Waves. He just kept saying how nice it is up here as we chatted over coffee. No cops, no hassles, nice air, couple of beautiful lakes, very quiet, endless places to ride motos, fly my drone, etc etc. Glad I got to grow up in the mountains and now retire in them.

  19. #19
    CCBW
    JPPR2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Here
    Posts
    5,806
    Quote Originally Posted by aging one View Post
    Just got the sad news my friends in Paradise did lose their home of 27 years. Raised two kids in that mountain home on 2 acres. Everything save one car is gone. Nothing left. The fire department reported even their safe melted. Second friend wiped out by fire in the last two years.. Literally beyond belief..
    Sad indeed. Rebuild time.

    You know I used to always ask myself if that happened to me, would it be time to leave the memories behind and find a different location. I had a few friends that lived along the American River and it seemed like every 7 to 10 years a brutal winter would come and wash all those homes away. They would rebuild with what they thought was better management for a flood only to lose it all again. I would have just left.

  20. #20
    Thailand Expat
    bobo746's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Last Online
    24-01-2019 @ 09:21 AM
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    14,326





Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •