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  1. #1
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    US Senate fast-tracks bill legalizing hemp as agriculture product

    Legislation that would legalize hemp as an agricultural product is getting fast-tracked through the Senate.


    The bill, introduced last week by Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), was placed on the Senate calendar on Monday.


    The procedural move, known as "Rule 14," allows it to skip over the committee process, paving the way for the legislation to be brought up on the Senate floor. The move doesn't automatically guarantee that the bill will get a vote.


    A spokesman for McConnell noted on Monday that they didn't have guidance or an announcement about if, or when, the bill would come up.


    The bill, known as the Hemp Farming Act of 2018, would legalize hemp, removing it from the federal list of controlled substances and allowing it to be sold as an agricultural commodity.


    "By legalizing hemp and empowering states to conduct their own oversight plans, we can give the hemp industry the tools necessary to create jobs and new opportunities for farmers and manufacturers around the county," McConnell said in a statement last week introducing the bill.


    In addition to McConnell, Sens. Rand Paul (R-Ky.), Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) and Jeff Merkley (D-Ore.) are supporting the legislation.


    The bill would allow states to regulate hemp, as well as allow hemp researchers to apply for Department of Agriculture grants and make help farmers eligible for crop insurance, according to McConnell's office.


    McConnell indicated late last month that he planned to introduce the bill.


    WDRB noted that Kentucky is currently conducting a pilot program through the Department of Agriculture to grow hemp, while a team at the University of Louisville is harvesting the crop to study its use as a biofuel and energy source.


    http://thehill.com/blogs/floor-actio...ulture-product

  2. #2
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    bsnub's Avatar
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    This is great news!

  3. #3
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    Yes, it is. Took me by surprise.

  4. #4
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    what is that ? marijuana ?

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dragonfly View Post
    what is that ? marijuana ?
    It will be an enormously valuable industrial crop.

    https://www.leafly.com/news/cannabis...-is-it-illegal

  6. #6
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    About time as it was the stupid fu88wits that banned it in the first place.

    American Historical Notes
    In 1619, America’s first marijuana law was enacted at Jamestown Colony, Virginia, “ordering” all farmers to “make tryal of “(grow) Indian hempseed. More mandatory (must-grow) hemp cultivation laws were enacted in Massachusetts in 1631, in Connecticut in 1632 and in the Chesapeake Colonies into the mid-1700s.
    Even in England, the much-sought-after prize of full British citizenship was bestowed by a decree of the crown on foreigners who would grow cannabis, and fines were often levied against those who refused.
    Cannabis hemp was legal tender (money) in most of the Americas from 1631 until the early 1800s. Why? To encourage American farmers to grow more.1
    You could pay your taxes with cannabis hemp throughout America for over 200 years.2
    You could even be jailed in America for not growing cannabis during several periods of shortage, e.g., in Virginia between 1763 and 1767.
    (Herndon, G.M., Hemp in Colonial Virginia, 1963; The Chesapeake Colonies, 1954; L.A. Times, August 12, 1981; et al.)
    George Washington and Thomas Jefferson grew cannabis on their plantations. Jefferson,3 while envoy to France, went to great expense, and even considerable risk to himself and his secret agents, to procure particularly good hempseeds smuggled illegally into Turkey from China. The Chinese Mandarins (political rulers) so valued their hemp seed that they made its exportation a capital offense.
    The Chinese character “Ma” was the earliest name for hemp. By the 10th century, A.D., Ma had become the generic term for fibers of all kinds, including jute and ramie. By then, the word for hemp had become “Ta-ma” or “Da-ma” meaning “great hemp.”
    The United States Census of 1850 counted 8,327 hemp “plantations”* (minimum 2,000-acre farms) growing cannabis hemp for cloth, canvas and even the cordage used for baling cotton. Most of these plantations were located in the South or in the Border States, primarily because of the cheap slave labor available prior to 1865 for the labor-intensive hemp industry.
    (U.S. Census, 1850; Allen, James Lane, The Reign of Law, A Tale of the Kentucky Hemp Fields, MacMillan Co., NY, 1900; Roffman, Roger. Ph.D., Marijuana as Medicine, Mendrone Books, WA, 1982.)
    *This figure does not include the tens of thousands of smaller farms growing cannabis, nor the hundreds of thousands if not millions of family hemp patches in America; nor does it take into account that well into this century 80% of America’s hemp consumption for 200 years still had to be imported from Russia, Hungary, Czechoslovakia and Poland, etc..
    Benjamin Franklin started one of America’s first paper mills with cannabis. This allowed America to have a free colonial press without having to beg or justify the need for paper and books from England.
    In addition, various marijuana and hashish extracts were the first, second or third most-prescribed medicines in the United States from 1842 until the 1890s. Its medicinal use continued legally through the 1930s for humans and figured even more prominently in American and world veterinary medicines during this time.
    Cannabis extract medicines were produced by Eli Lilly, Parke-Davis, Tildens, Brothers Smith (Smith Brothers), Squibb and many other American and European companies and apothecaries. During all this time there was not one reported death from cannabis extract medicines, and virtually no abuse or mental disorders reported, except for first-time or novice-users occasionally becoming disoriented or overly introverted.
    (Mikuriya, Tod, M.D., Marijuana Medical Papers, Medi-Comp Press, CA, 1973; Cohen, Sidney & Stillman, Richard, Therapeutic Potential of Marijuana, Plenum Press, NY, 1976.)
    World Historical Notes
    “The earliest known woven fabric was apparently of hemp, which began to be worked in the eighth millennium (8,000-7,000 B.C.).” (The Columbia History of the World, 1981, page 54.)
    The body of literature (i.e., archaeology, anthropology, philology, economy, history) pertaining to hemp is in general agreement that, at the very least:
    From more than 1,000 years before the time of Christ until 1883 A.D., cannabis hemp, indeed, marijuana was our planet’s largest agricultural crop and most important industry, involving thousands of products and enterprises; producing the overall majority of Earth’s fiber, fabric, lighting oil, paper, incense and medicines. In addition, it was a primary source of essential food oil and protein for humans and animals.
    According to virtually every anthropologist and university in the world, marijuana was also used in most of our religions and cults as one of the seven or so most widely used mood-, mind-or pain-altering drugs when taken as psychotropic, psychedelic (mind-manifesting or -expanding) sacraments.
    Almost without exception, these sacred (drug) experiences inspired our superstitions, amulets, talismans, religions, prayers, and language codes. (See Chapter10 on “Religions and Magic.”)
    (Wasson, R. Gordon, Soma, Divine Mushroom of Immortality; Allegro, J.M., Sacred Mushroom & the Cross, Doubleday, NY, 1969; Pliny; Josephus; Herodotus; Dead Sea Scrolls; Gnostic Gospels; the Bible; Ginsberg Legends Kaballah, c. 1860; Paracelsus; British Museum; Budge; Ency. Britannica, Pharmacological Cults; Schultes & Wasson, Plants of the Gods; Research of: R.E. Schultes, Harvard Botanical Dept.; Wm. EmBoden, Cal State U., Northridge; et al.)
    Great Wars were Fought to Ensure the Availability of Hemp
    For example, the primary reason for the War of 1812 (fought by America against Great Britain) was access to Russian cannabis hemp. Russian hemp was also the principal reason that Napoleon (our 1812 ally) and his “Continental Systems” allies invaded Russia in 1812. (See Chapter 11, “The (Hemp) War of 1812 and Napoleon Invades Russia.”)
    In 1942, after the Japanese invasion of the Philippines cut off the supply of Manila (Abaca) hemp, the U.S. government distributed 400,000 pounds of cannabis seeds to American farmers from Wisconsin to Kentucky, who produced 42,000 tons of hemp fiber annually until 1946 when the war ended.
    Why Has Cannabis Hemp Been so Important in History?
    Because cannabis hemp is, overall, the strongest, most-durable, longest-lasting natural soft-fiber on the planet. Its leaves and flower tops (marijuana) were, depending on the culture, the first, second or third most-important and most-used medicines for two-thirds of the world’s people for at least 3,000 years, until the turn of the 20th century.
    Botanically, hemp is a member of the most advanced plant family on Earth. It is a dioecious (having male, female and sometimes hermaphroditic, male and female on same plant), woody, herbaceous annual that uses the sun more efficiently than virtually any other plant on our planet, reaching a robust 12 to 20 feet or more in one short growing season. It can be grown in virtually any climate or soil condition on Earth, even marginal ones.
    Hemp is, by far, Earth’s premier, renewable natural resource. This is why hemp is so very important.
    Footnotes:
    1. Clark, V.S., History of Manufacture in the United States, McGraw Hill, NY 1929, Pg. 34.
    2. Ibid.
    3. Diaries of George Washington; Writings of George Washington, Letter to Dr. James Anderson, May 26, 1794, vol. 33, p. 433, (U.S. govt. pub., 1931); Letters to his caretaker, William Pearce, 1795 & 1796; Thomas Jefferson, Jefferson’s Farm Books; Abel, Ernest, Marijuana: The First 12,000 Years, Plenum Press, NY, 1980; Dr. Michael Aldrich, et al.

  7. #7
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    I'll be interested to see how Trump spins this one if it passes.

  8. #8
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    Some GOP's figured a way to score some big $$ from the hemp industry

  9. #9
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    SO they finally twigged that there are no "coal jobs".

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by uncle junior View Post
    Some GOP's figured a way to score some big $$ from the hemp industry
    We have a winner! It is going to be a huge industry almost overnight and will be a real benefit to farmers as well.

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