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  1. #1
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    Supreme Court to decide if US has right to data on world’s servers

    The Supreme Court on Monday agreed to decide whether law enforcement authorities, armed with a valid search warrant from a federal judge, can demand that the US tech sector hand over data that is stored on overseas servers. In this case, which is now one of the biggest privacy cases on the high court's docket, the justices will review a lower court's ruling that US warrants don't apply to data housed on foreign servers, in this instance, a Microsoft server in Ireland.


    The US government appealed, contending it has the legal right, with a valid court warrant, to reach into the world's servers with the assistance of the tech sector, no matter where the data is stored.


    The case has huge foreign policy ramifications as well. Federal authorities sometimes demand that the US tech sector comply with court orders that conflict with laws of countries where the data is housed.


    The dispute the Supreme Court chose to consider centers on the US government having obtained a valid warrant for e-mail messages as part of a drug investigation. Microsoft challenged the warrant and convinced a federal appeals court that US law does not apply to foreign data.


    In agreeing to hear the case, the justices did not comment on their reasoning.


    All the while, Congress is mulling legislation to enable the federal government to negotiate reciprocity agreements with like-minded foreign nations to give each side a right to data on foreign servers—with a valid warrant.


    In its appeal to the high court, meanwhile, the US government said that the US tech sector should turn over any information requested with a valid court warrant. It doesn't matter where the data is hosted, the government argues. What matters, the authorities maintain, is whether the data can be accessed from within the United States.


    Brad Smith, Microsoft's chief legal officer, said in a Monday blog post following the high court's announcement: "If U.S. law enforcement can obtain the emails of foreigners stored outside the United States, what's to stop the government of another country from getting your emails even though they are located in the United States?"


    No oral argument date was immediately set.


    https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/...orlds-servers/

  2. #2
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    interesting, that would actually be in direct confrontation with EU directives on Data that was voted a few years ago

  3. #3
    disconnected SKkin's Avatar
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  4. #4
    ความรู้ลึกลับ HuangLao's Avatar
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    A right ​to.....?

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by HuangLao View Post
    A right ​to.....?
    Yeah, a right to, apparently.
    Just as the US has a right to impose democracy anywhere in the world, as it sees fit.

  6. #6
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    It could leave companies like Microsoft between a rock and a hard place.

    If they keep it they could be breaking the law in the US, if they share it they could be breaking the law in Europe.

  7. #7
    Days Work Done! Norton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    Supreme Court to decide if US has right to data on world’s servers
    Figures. The same bunch who found it perfectly legal to shit all over the 4th Amendment by declaring the Patriot Act and it's new and ironically named the USA Freedom Act. Big brother goes international.

    Supreme count can decide what they like but the rest of the world and the big internet players need to tell them to insert their decision in a place the sun don't shine.

    Rant not over. More to come.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maanaam View Post
    Yeah, a right to, apparently.
    Just as the US has a right to impose democracy anywhere in the world, as it sees fit.


    Fucking ridiculous innit.

    The US decides itself whether it has the right to access the WORLD'S servers.

    How about the rest of the world makes the fvcking decision?

    Fucking wankers.

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