Results 1 to 15 of 15
  1. #1
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Chiang Mai
    Posts
    22,291

    Mystery Surrounding Ancient Easter Island People Deepens



    The massive brooding stone figures peering from Easter Island's hillsides are emblematic of the enigmatic people who once thrived on the dot of land in the middle of the Pacific. New genetic research only deepens the mystery around these people.


    Scientists said on Thursday an analysis of DNA from ancient skeletal remains ruled out the likelihood that Easter Island's inhabitants intermixed with South Americans before the arrival of Europeans on the island in 1722.


    A 2014 genetic study had indicated interbreeding between the people of Easter Island, or Rapa Nui, and native people in South America occurred roughly between 1300 and 1500. The new research, studying the DNA of three Rapa Nui people from the 1400s and 1500s and two from the 1800s, found no evidence of such mingling.


    The research underscored the isolation of these people, who lived on an outpost some 2,300 miles (3,700 km) west of South America and 1,100 miles (1,770 km) from the nearest island.


    "Our study shows that there is no simple scenario of population exchange and migration between Rapa Nui and the Americas as suggested by many archaeologists, historians, population geneticists and even adventurers," said archaeologist Cat Jarman of the University of Bristol in Britain.


    Jarman said the study, published in the journal Current Biology, confirmed a growing body of evidence that Easter Island was settled by Polynesians who crossed the open ocean.


    "We were surprised that we didn't find any Native American admixture in our ancient Rapa Nui individuals," Jarman added.


    The Rapa Nui people formed a unique culture best known for the 900 monumental head-and-torso stone statues known as moai erected around Easter Island. The culture flourished starting around 1200.


    The study did not rule out some type of cultural contact between Easter Island and South America. "However, if it did take place, the new evidence suggests that it was infrequent or, at least, that it did not leave a discernible genetic trace," Jarman said.


    University of California-Santa Cruz anthropologist Lars Fehren-Schmitz said evidence like the presence of sweet potatoes, a South American staple, in Polynesia indicates some cultural exchange occurred between the Americas and Polynesia before the impact of European colonization.


    "Many researchers suggest Rapa Nui as kind of the best point of contact because it is closest to South America, but an exchange could have also been initiated on other islands, if it happened," Fehren-Schmitz added.


    http://www.voanews.com/a/mystery-sur...s/4067600.html
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Chiang Mai
    Posts
    22,291
    Attached Images Attached Images

  3. #3
    Thailand Expat

    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    6,371
    Quote Originally Posted by misskit View Post
    "We were surprised that we didn't find any Native American admixture in our ancient Rapa Nui individuals," Jarman added.
    Thor Heyerdahl's Kontiki expedition to prove Western migration from South America into the Pacific has long been disproved.
    Eater Islands language is definitely Polynesian. If the theories of South American Indian migration are based on kumara (sweet potato), and considering Heyerdahl's theory which was based on currents and prevailing winds, is it not possible that sweet potato stock drifted there on a natural raft, say a big clump of flood driven earth and debris washed to sea from a river? Feasible. More feasible, I'd say, than human migration from the East.

  4. #4
    Member HuangLao's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Siam
    Posts
    721
    What should always be baffling is the refusal, among the scholarly circles, to believe/understand that ancient people [worldwide] were quite apt at long-distant ocean travel.
    These factual theories tens to be dismissed.

  5. #5
    Days Work Done! Norton's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Roiet
    Posts
    25,952
    Quote Originally Posted by misskit View Post
    Rapa Nui
    Lot to be learned from these folks. A dead civilization wiped out by it's own obsession with building those stone faces. The quest to produce them at the fastest pace possible resulted in destruction of lush forests and farmlands.

    Ignore and misuse resources available with unfettered production and earthlings wiil go the way of the Rapa Nui.

    Obvious as the nose on a moai.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.

  6. #6
    Thailand Expat klong toey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Last Online
    Today @ 03:20 AM
    Posts
    5,552
    Some interesting carvings and human bones in the caves on the island as well really amazing cave explored there in this weeks episode of Expedition Unknown .
    Its on the Travel Channel i watched it using Kodi yesterday.

  7. #7
    R.I.P.
    DrB0b's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    ALL GLORY TO THE HYPNOTOAD
    Posts
    15,553
    Quote Originally Posted by HuangLao View Post
    What should always be baffling is the refusal, among the scholarly circles, to believe/understand that ancient people [worldwide] were quite apt at long-distant ocean travel.
    Nonsense, there is no doubt at all about the astonishing journeys taken by the Polynesian peoples. Where do you get this gibberish from? Certainly not from any scholarly works of the last 50 years.

  8. #8
    Thailand Expat

    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    6,371
    Ummm, Bob, I think you are agreeing with him. The Polynesians did indeed travel far and wide across the Pacific. Both eastwards and westwards.
    He said "apt" when he meant, I'm sure, "adept".

  9. #9
    Pedantic bastard
    nidhogg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    13,040
    Quote Originally Posted by Maanaam View Post
    Ummm, Bob, I think you are agreeing with him.
    Pretty sure he is not. Only in Jeffs imagination do academic circles dispute Polynesian exploration.

  10. #10
    Thailand Expat
    Klondyke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Last Online
    Today @ 12:39 PM
    Posts
    1,281
    Certified by UNESCO?

  11. #11
    Member HuangLao's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Siam
    Posts
    721
    Misinterpreted.
    Not excluding well known Polynesian exploration and maritime skills, but other ancient civilsations the world over.

    My point misunderstood.
    Imagine that.


    From critical and alternative thinkers [not], nonetheless.

  12. #12
    Pedantic bastard
    nidhogg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    13,040
    Quote Originally Posted by HuangLao View Post
    Misinterpreted.
    Not excluding well known Polynesian exploration and maritime skills, but other ancient civilsations the world over.

    My point misunderstood.
    Imagine that.


    From critical and alternative thinkers [not], nonetheless.
    Maligned but interpersonal euphemisms often engender alienation from societal environs.












    Or in this case, FOJ.

  13. #13
    R.I.P.
    DrB0b's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    ALL GLORY TO THE HYPNOTOAD
    Posts
    15,553
    Quote Originally Posted by Maanaam View Post
    Ummm, Bob, I think you are agreeing with him. The Polynesians did indeed travel far and wide across the Pacific. Both eastwards and westwards.
    Which is what I said


    He said academics disputed that the Polynesians were great travellers and navigators. I said that there was no dispute at all over the fact that they were great travellers and navigators.

  14. #14
    Thailand Expat

    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    6,371
    Quote Originally Posted by DrB0b View Post
    Which is what I said


    He said academics disputed that the Polynesians were great travellers and navigators. I said that there was no dispute at all over the fact that they were great travellers and navigators.
    Ahh...ok, I see now. Sorry.
    But he did agree that the Polies were great sea travelers.
    He's got a weird way of writing.

  15. #15
    Days Work Done! Norton's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Roiet
    Posts
    25,952

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •