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  1. #1
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    WikiLeaks publishes 'entire hacking capacity of the CIA'

    WikiLeaks has published what it claims is the largest ever batch of confidential documents on the CIA, revealing the breadth of the agency’s ability to hack smartphones and popular social media messaging apps such as WhatsApp.

    A total of 8,761 documents have been published as part of ‘Year Zero’, the first part in a series of leaks on the agency that the whistleblower organization has dubbed ‘Vault 7.’

    In a statement WikiLeaks said ‘Year Zero’ revealed details of the CIA’s “global covert hacking program,” including “weaponized exploits” used against company products including “Apple's iPhone, Google's Android and Microsoft's Windows and even Samsung TVs, which are turned into covert microphones.”

    According to the cache of documents released, the CIA's Mobile Devices Branch (MDB) has developed multiple tools and systems to hack popular smart phones and remotely order them to send both location data as well as audio and text communications.

    The phones’ cameras and microphones can also be remotely activated at will.

    Such tools and techniques allow the CIA to hack social media platforms such as WhatsApp, Signal, Telegram, Wiebo, Confide and Cloackman before encryption can be applied, WikiLeaks claims in the statement on their website.

    The time period covered in the latest leak is 2013 to 2016, according to the CIA timestamps on the documents themselves.

    The source of the information told WikiLeaks in a statement that they wish to initiate a public debate about the “security, creation, use, proliferation and democratic control of cyberweapons.”

    Policy questions that should be debated in public include “whether the CIA's hacking capabilities exceed its mandated powers and the problem of public oversight of the agency,” WikiLeaks claims the source said.

    Commenting on the leak, WikiLeaks co-editor Julian Assange said the cache showed the “extreme proliferation risk in the development of cyber 'weapons.”

    “The significance of ‘Year Zero’ goes well beyond the choice between cyberwar and cyberpeace. The disclosure is also exceptional from a political, legal and forensic perspective," he said.

    The FAQ section of the release yields some key details which highlight the true extent of the leak: firstly, the information was “obtained recently and covers through 2016”.

    Secondly, WikiLeaks has asserted that it has not mined the entire leak and has only verified it, asking that journalists and activists do the leg work.

    In WikiLeaks’ analysis of ‘Year Zero’ it detailed ‘Weeping Angel’, a surveillance technique which infiltrates smart TV’s, transforming them into microphones.

    An attack against Samsung TV’s used ‘Weeping Angel’ in cooperation with MI5, placing them into a ‘Fake-Off’ mode, recording conversations even when the device appears to be off.

    In the released batch “Things you might do” with ‘Weeping Angel’ is detailed in a document. “Investigate any listening ports & their respective services” is listed, along with “extract browser credentials or history.”

    The release came after a planned press conference suffered a cyberattack, according to the whistleblowing organization. WikiLeaks has since rescheduled its press conference.
    https://www.rt.com/news/379724-wikil...e-cia-hacking/

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    Vault 7: CIA Hacking Tools Revealed *WIKILEAKS RELEASE*

    Press Release

    Today, Tuesday 7 March 2017, WikiLeaks begins its new series of leaks on the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency. Code-named "Vault 7" by WikiLeaks, it is the largest ever publication of confidential documents on the agency.

    The first full part of the series, "Year Zero", comprises 8,761 documents and files from an isolated, high-security network situated inside the CIA's Center for Cyber Intelligence in Langley, Virgina. It follows an introductory disclosure last month of CIA targeting French political parties and candidates in the lead up to the 2012 presidential election.

    Recently, the CIA lost control of the majority of its hacking arsenal including malware, viruses, trojans, weaponized "zero day" exploits, malware remote control systems and associated documentation. This extraordinary collection, which amounts to more than several hundred million lines of code, gives its possessor the entire hacking capacity of the CIA. The archive appears to have been circulated among former U.S. government hackers and contractors in an unauthorized manner, one of whom has provided WikiLeaks with portions of the archive.

    "Year Zero" introduces the scope and direction of the CIA's global covert hacking program, its malware arsenal and dozens of "zero day" weaponized exploits against a wide range of U.S. and European company products, include Apple's iPhone, Google's Android and Microsoft's Windows and even Samsung TVs, which are turned into covert microphones.

    Since 2001 the CIA has gained political and budgetary preeminence over the U.S. National Security Agency (NSA). The CIA found itself building not just its now infamous drone fleet, but a very different type of covert, globe-spanning force — its own substantial fleet of hackers. The agency's hacking division freed it from having to disclose its often controversial operations to the NSA (its primary bureaucratic rival) in order to draw on the NSA's hacking capacities.

    By the end of 2016, the CIA's hacking division, which formally falls under the agency's Center for Cyber Intelligence (CCI), had over 5000 registered users and had produced more than a thousand hacking systems, trojans, viruses, and other "weaponized" malware. Such is the scale of the CIA's undertaking that by 2016, its hackers had utilized more code than that used to run Facebook. The CIA had created, in effect, its "own NSA" with even less accountability and without publicly answering the question as to whether such a massive budgetary spend on duplicating the capacities of a rival agency could be justified.

    In a statement to WikiLeaks the source details policy questions that they say urgently need to be debated in public, including whether the CIA's hacking capabilities exceed its mandated powers and the problem of public oversight of the agency. The source wishes to initiate a public debate about the security, creation, use, proliferation and democratic control of cyberweapons.

    Once a single cyber 'weapon' is 'loose' it can spread around the world in seconds, to be used by rival states, cyber mafia and teenage hackers alike.

    Julian Assange, WikiLeaks editor stated that "There is an extreme proliferation risk in the development of cyber 'weapons'. Comparisons can be drawn between the uncontrolled proliferation of such 'weapons', which results from the inability to contain them combined with their high market value, and the global arms trade. But the significance of "Year Zero" goes well beyond the choice between cyberwar and cyberpeace. The disclosure is also exceptional from a political, legal and forensic perspective."

    Wikileaks has carefully reviewed the "Year Zero" disclosure and published substantive CIA documentation while avoiding the distribution of 'armed' cyberweapons until a consensus emerges on the technical and political nature of the CIA's program and how such 'weapons' should analyzed, disarmed and published.

    Wikileaks has also decided to redact and anonymise some identifying information in "Year Zero" for in depth analysis. These redactions include ten of thousands of CIA targets and attack machines throughout Latin America, Europe and the United States. While we are aware of the imperfect results of any approach chosen, we remain committed to our publishing model and note that the quantity of published pages in "Vault 7" part one (“Year Zero”) already eclipses the total number of pages published over the first three years of the Edward Snowden NSA leaks.
    More, Details, at length from Wikileaks:

    https://wikileaks.org/ciav7p1/#PRESS

  3. #3
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    Have CNN commented on this as I'm interested in the libtard take on it or they just screaming fake news?

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    WikiLeaks publishes 'biggest ever leak of secret CIA documents'

    The US intelligence agencies are facing fresh embarrassment after WikiLeaks published what it described as the biggest ever leak of confidential documents from the CIA detailing the tools it uses to break into phones, communication apps and other electronic devices.

    The thousands of leaked documents focus mainly on techniques for hacking and reveal how the CIA cooperated with British intelligence to engineer a way to compromise smart televisions and turn them into improvised surveillance devices.

    The leak, named “Vault 7” by WikiLeaks, will once again raise questions about the inability of US spy agencies to protect secret documents in the digital age. It follows disclosures about Afghanistan and Iraq by army intelligence analyst Chelsea Manning in 2010 and about the National Security Agency and Britain’s GCHQ by Edward Snowden in 2013.

    The new documents appear to be from the CIA’s 200-strong Center for Cyber Intelligence and show in detail how the agency’s digital specialists engage in hacking. Monday’s leak of about 9,000 secret files, which WikiLeaks said was only the first tranche of documents it had obtained, were all relatively recent, running from 2013 to 2016.

    The revelations in the documents include:

    CIA hackers targeted smartphones and computers.

    The Center for Cyber Intelligence, based at the CIA headquarters in Langley, Virginia, has a second covert base in the US consulate in Frankfurt which covers Europe, the Middle East and Africa.

    A programme called Weeping Angel describes how to attack a Samsung F8000 TV set so that it appears to be off but can still be used for monitoring.

    The CIA declined to comment on the leak beyond the agency’s now-stock refusal to verify the content. “We do not comment on the authenticity or content of purported intelligence documents,” wrote CIA spokesperson Heather Fritz Horniak. But it is understood the documents are genuine and a hunt is under way for the leakers or hackers responsible for the leak.

    WikiLeaks, in a statement, was vague about its source. “The archive appears to have been circulated among former US government hackers and contractors in an unauthorised manner, one of whom has provided WikiLeaks with portions of the archive,” the organisation said.

    The leak feeds into the present feverish controversy in Washington over alleged links between Donald Trump’s team and Russia. US officials have claimed WikiLeaks acts as a conduit for Russian intelligence and Trump sided with the website during the White House election campaign, praising the organisation for publishing leaked Hillary Clinton emails.

    Asked about the claims regarding vulnerabilities in consumer products, Sean Spicer, the White House press secretary, said: “I’m not going to comment on that. Obviously that’s something that’s not been fully evaluated.”

    Asked about Trump’s praise for WikiLeaks during last year’s election, when it published emails hacked from Clinton’s campaign chairman, Spicer told the Guardian: “The president said there’s a difference between Gmail accounts and classified information. The president made that distinction a couple of weeks ago.”

    Julian Assange, the WikiLeaks editor-in-chief, said the disclosures were “exceptional from a political, legal and forensic perspective”. WikiLeaks has been criticised in the past for dumping documents on the internet unredacted and this time the names of officials and other information have been blacked out.

    WikiLeaks shared the information in advance with Der Spiegel in Germany and La Repubblica in Italy.

    Edward Snowden, who is in exile in Russia, said in a series of tweets the documents seemed genuine and that only an insider could know this kind of detail. He tweeted:


    Edward Snowden
    (@Snowden)
    If you're writing about the CIA/@Wikileaks story, here's the big deal: first public evidence USG secretly paying to keep US software unsafe. pic.twitter.com/kYi0NC2mOp

    March 7, 2017
    Edward Snowden
    (@Snowden)
    The CIA reports show the USG developing vulnerabilities in US products, then intentionally keeping the holes open. Reckless beyond words.

    March 7, 2017
    The document dealing with Samsung televisions carries the CIA logo and is described as secret. It adds “USA/UK”. It says: “Accomplishments during joint workshop with MI5/BTSS (British Security Service) (week of June 16, 2014).”

    It details how to fake it so that the television appears to be off but in reality can be used to monitor targets. It describes the television as being in “Fake Off” mode. Referring to UK involvement, it says: “Received sanitized source code from UK with comms and encryption removed.”

    WikiLeaks, in a press release heralding the leak, said: “The attack against Samsung smart TVs was developed in cooperation with the United Kingdom’s MI5/BTSS. After infestation, Weeping Angel places the target TV in a ‘Fake Off’ mode, so that the owner falsely believes the TV is off when it is on. In ‘Fake Off’ mode the TV operates as a bug, recording conversations in the room and sending them over the internet to a covert CIA server.”

    The role of MI5, the domestic intelligence service, is mainly to track terrorists and foreign intelligence agencies and monitoring along the lines revealed in the CIA documents would require a warrant.

    The Snowden revelations created tension between the intelligence agencies and the major IT companies upset that the extent of their cooperation with the NSA had been exposed. But the companies were primarily angered over the revelation the agencies were privately working on ways to hack into their products. The CIA revelations risk renewing the friction with the private sector.

    The initial reaction of members of the intelligence community was to question whether the latest revelations were in the public interest.

    A source familiar with the CIA’s information security capabilities took issue with WikiLeaks’s comment that the leaker wanted “to initiate a public debate about cyberweapons”. But the source said this was akin to claiming to be worried about nuclear proliferation and then offering up the launch codes for just one country’s nuclear weapons at the moment when a war seemed most likely to begin.

    Monday’s leaks also reveal that CIA hackers operating out of the Frankfurt consulate are given diplomatic (“black”) passports and US State Department cover. The documents include instructions for incoming CIA hackers that make Germany’s counter-intelligence efforts appear inconsequential.

    The document reads:

    “Breeze through German customs because you have your cover-for-action story down pat, and all they did was stamp your passport.

    Your cover story (for this trip):

    Q: Why are you here?

    A: Supporting technical consultations at the consulate.”

    The leaks also reveal a number of the CIA’s electronic attack methods are designed for physical proximity. These attack methods are able to penetrate high-security networks that are disconnected from the internet, such as police record databases. In these cases, a CIA officer, agent or allied intelligence officer acting under instructions, physically infiltrates the targeted workplace. The attacker is provided with a USB stick containing malware developed for the CIA for this purpose, which is inserted into the targeted computer. The attacker then infects and extracts data.

    A CIA attack system called Fine Dining provides 24 decoy applications for CIA spies to use. To witnesses, the spy appears to be running a programme showing videos, presenting slides, playing a computer game, or even running a fake virus scanner. But while the decoy application is on the screen, the system is automatically infected and ransacked.

    The documents also provide travel advice for hackers heading to Frankfurt: “Flying Lufthansa: Booze is free so enjoy (within reason).”

    The rights group Privacy International, in a statement, said it had long warned about government hacking powers. “Insufficient security protections in the growing amount of devices connected to the internet or so-called ‘smart’ devices, such as Samsung smart TVs, only compound the problem, giving governments easier access to our private lives,” the group said.
    https://www.theguardian.com/media/20...g-surveillance

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by buriramboy
    Have CNN commented on this as I'm interested in the libtard take on it or they just screaming fake news?
    CIA hacks TVs, phones all over the world, Wikileaks claims - Mar. 7, 2017

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    Last edited by Slick; 08-03-2017 at 04:47 AM.

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    WikiLeaks CIA documents are most recent weapon in US-Russia battle

    The latest WikiLeaks document dump about the CIA’s computer hacking tools is being viewed in Washington as just the most recent skirmish in a struggle between US and Russian intelligence services – a fight in which WikiLeaks is widely seen as sitting firmly in Moscow’s corner.

    The latest leaks also land amid an ongoing and very public feud between the US president and the country’s intelligence agencies over Kremlin efforts to influence the election in Donald Trump’s favour.

    In recent months, the president has repeatedly denigrated US intelligence agencies – going as far as comparing them to the Nazi regime – while openly cheering on WikiLeaks activities.

    Perceptions of the group in the west have changed markedly since it first became widely known in 2010 with the release of huge numbers of classified US documents from the Afghanistan and Iraq wars, as well as US embassies around the world. WikiLeaks was widely embraced by opponents of those wars and supporters of greater government transparency.

    But since its high-profile role in the 2016 presidential election, it is now viewed with far greater scepticism. Its leaks focused exclusively on Hillary Clinton’s camp, and were released at critical moments in the campaign. (Following the dump of nearly 2,000 emails hacked from the Hillary Clinton campaign, Trump told voters “I love WikiLeaks!”)

    In early January, the CIA, NSA and FBI assessed with “high confidence” that Russian military intelligence was behind anonymous hackers Guccifer 2.0 and DCLeaks.com, which stole data from prominent Democrats and passed it on to WikiLeaks.

    “Moscow most likely chose WikiLeaks because of its self-proclaimed reputation for authenticity. Disclosures through WikiLeaks did not contain any evident forgeries,” the agencies found.

    WikiLeaks’ founder, Julian Assange, has insisted that the documents did not come from Russian sources, although the organisation also says that in most cases it does not know the sources of the data passed on to it.

    In a press release announcing the latest document dump, WikiLeaks suggested that the original source was a former US government hacker or contractor.

    Assange has been living in the Ecuadorian embassy in London for more than four years, since Sweden sought his extradition for questioning on an accusation of sexual assault. In that time, he has appeared frequently on Moscow-run Russia Today (RT) television.

    WikiLeaks has published little or no material that could be seen as damaging to Russia, although Assange has argued that is because the leaks the organisation receives are overwhelmingly in English, while Russian-language material finds its way to other outlets.

    “There is a lot of circumstantial evidence of the links between Assange and Russia,” said Susan Hennessey, a former NSA lawyer now at the Brookings Institution. “It’s certainly not a coincidence that Russian military intelligence selected WikiLeaks as a distribution platform for its Democrats hack.”

    “WikiLeaks’ involvement creates a reason for suspicion. It has committed itself to putting out material that is harmful to western interests, but has assiduously avoided releasing material that could be perceived as damaging to Russian interests.”

    WikiLeaks has also published material damaging to the establishment parties in the run-up to elections in France and Germany, to the advantage of pro-Moscow parties.

    In December, it published a cache of documents from a parliamentary inquiry into collaboration between the NSA and German foreign intelligence, the BND, a potential embarrassment for Chancellor Angela Merkel.

    Last month the organisation used Twitter to promote more than 3,000 documents from its archives on the centre-right French presidential candidate, François Fillon, raising French fears that WikiLeaks could become a channel to influence the vote in favour of the Front National’s leader, Marine Le Pen, whose campaign has been part-financed by Moscow-based banks.
    https://www.theguardian.com/media/20...ussia-conflict

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    Excellent stuff. I consider Wikileaks a valuable public service- which no doubt explains why it's founder and most prominent public figure, Julian Assange, is effectively being held prisoner in the Ecuadorian embassy, London on false rape charges, since August 2012. Then, of course there is Ed Snowden- a US citizen who has sought, and obtained, political asylum in Russia for several years now. How the world turns. Not to mention pathetic Çhelsea' Manning- held in solitary confinement for over five years, his sentence recently transmuted by Pres. Obama (not pardoned). At least he/she will be free soon, in a manner of speaking.

    Those of us who believe in transparency, principles of democracy, liberty, personal privacy and the rule of law might ponder the direction in which our 'democratic' society is, and has been moving. Cynics might respond that it has basically been the same all along- just the technology, and hence tools, have changed- and quote the McCarthy era witch huts and CIA Contra scandals as examples. Or the Tonkin incident.

    Quote Originally Posted by Slick
    Recently, the CIA lost control of the majority of its hacking arsenal including malware, viruses, trojans, weaponized "zero day" exploits, malware remote control systems and associated documentation. This extraordinary collection, which amounts to more than several hundred million lines of code, gives its possessor the entire hacking capacity of the CIA. The archive appears to have been circulated among former U.S. government hackers and contractors in an unauthorized manner, one of whom has provided WikiLeaks with portions of the archive.
    So the CIA has lost control of this information, and it is now out there in the big wide world, being sought after by many an interested party. Good, or Bad? Seeing it is no longer a CIA monopoly, and will inevitably be disseminated further- is it in the public interest that this vast archive of data be made publicly available?
    Quote Originally Posted by Slick
    Such is the scale of the CIA's undertaking that by 2016, its hackers had utilized more code than that used to run Facebook. The CIA had created, in effect, its "own NSA" with even less accountability and without publicly answering the question as to whether such a massive budgetary spend on duplicating the capacities of a rival agency could be justified.
    US taxpayers, take note. I have said it before, and will say it again- the CIA is redundant, and dangerous. There is nothing it can do that another security agency- such as NSA, MI or FBI- cannot do, more accountably and legally. Then there are the times it has worked at cross purposes to other security agencies such as the DEA, and official, publicly stated government policy. A situation that continues to this day.

    It should be disbanded, in the public interest.
    probes Aliens

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    Quote Originally Posted by Slick
    The latest WikiLeaks document dump about the CIA’s computer hacking tools is being viewed in Washington as just the most recent skirmish in a struggle between US and Russian intelligence services – a fight in which WikiLeaks is widely seen as sitting firmly in Moscow’s corner.
    Yes, go ahead- politicise it. How predictable- and bring up the Cold war bogeyman of the big bad Russian bear. What's old is new again.

    I would remind you that neither Ed Snowden or Chelsea Manning acted for personal gain, rather through conscience- and have paid, and continue to pay, a high price for their actions. As does Assange, who's position is more opaque- but he and his organisation Wijileaks are certainly critical facilitators of this sort of information reaching the public. Meanwhile, the mainstream 'Free press' attempts to subvert it, minimise it's impact, politicise it, demonise it's sources, etc. Even the respected Grauniad these days increasingly resembles Pravda- at least, when éstablishment' interests are at stake. How the world turns.

    One thing is for sure- this latest leak is bigger than Snowden & Manning combined. Much bigger. I wonder who the deep throat is? Considerably more sinister people, and forces, than myself are wondering too- so do watch your back.

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    P.S:- Time to rethink "the Patriot Act"?

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    Quote Originally Posted by sabang
    US taxpayers, take note. I have said it before, and will say it again- the CIA is redundant, and dangerous
    I'm sure the US taxpayer was eagerly waiting for your opinion again.

    If the US can do this, so can Russia, China, Israel, GB and many others.....

    Yawn.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sabang
    Time to rethink "the Patriot Act"?
    Too late. Intel agencies have been given unfettered power to do what they want any time they want. Anyone attempting to rein them in will be labeled "unpatriotic" and accused of harming the safety of the nation. Pandora's box cannot be closed. Personal privacy is now a quaint historical remnant.

    Folks will accept anything when driven by FEAR even though irrational paranoidl fear.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Humbert
    If the US can do this
    And do this. And do this again. And duplicate this, over several different agencies. All paid for by the long suffering US stooge, sorry taxpayer. Yes, real smart.

    Again, there is nothing, no role or function, that the CIA performs that cannot be replicated (and often is) by another existing US intelligence agency- and vice versa (do you really need two NSA's? Since when was this part of the CIA's mandate?). And when we look at the CIA's distinctly unenviable record- in terms of effectiveness, accountability, transparency to the government of the day, and downright legality- what is their remaining raison détre?

    Oh I dunno. I just pay for it. But it must be right, because they said it is.
    Last edited by sabang; 08-03-2017 at 09:15 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sabang
    Considerably more sinister people, and forces, than myself
    Surely not in Thailand, Singapore possibly.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Slick
    a surveillance technique which infiltrates smart TV’s, transforming them into microphones.
    You can do all you like with software, but without the hardware, nothing is going to happen.
    How do you convert a device that has no microphone into a listening device?
    Laptops and smartphones have microphones, but I don't think TVs do. It requires physical change of wiring (or circuitry) to convert a speaker into a microphone, and if the TV has integral amplifier (which it probably does), then the reverse process doesn't work anyway.
    If so (that they don't), then the "leak" is BS.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Maanaam
    How do you convert a device that has no microphone into a listening device?
    Some smart tv's have a micophone and camera.

    https://www.cnet.com/how-to/samsung-smart-tv-spying/

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    smart tvs being used as spying devices is old news

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    some smart tvs have hand gesture control too, im jackin off behind a cushion from now on

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    Quote Originally Posted by buriramboy View Post
    Have CNN commented on this as I'm interested in the libtard take on it or they just screaming fake news?
    The libtards will have an answer. It will Be fake and be conjured up by their master; which of course the cucks will believe!

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    guess spying in Hotel rooms is getting more convenient, with those Smart TVs

    oh wait, golden shower, it wasn't the KGB, it was the CIA

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    Quote Originally Posted by Maanaam
    Laptops and smartphones have microphones, but I don't think TVs do. It requires physical change of wiring (or circuitry) to convert a speaker into a microphone, and if the TV has integral amplifier (which it probably does), then the reverse process doesn't work anyway.
    If so (that they don't), then the "leak" is BS.
    The leak is to maintain paranoia among the masses. While everyone's attention is diverted to their suspicious-looking smart tvs, their desk fans are in silent surveillance mode, continuously scanning rooms from side to side for intel.

    Crafty buggers ain't they.

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    No-one should use a "Smart TV".

    The fuckers can even get trashed with ransomware these days.

    Turn everything off an get an nVidia Shield.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jesus Jones
    It will Be fake and be conjured up by their master
    Who is claiming its fake? Who is this master? The lizard man that your master king dipshit Alex believes in?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jesus Jones
    which of course the cucks will believe!
    You people really are a special kind of stupid aren't you?

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    Yet, still lost is who the real enemy and bad guys are....

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    ^ is it Panasonic?

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