Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Chiang Mai
    Posts
    29,507

    Puerto Rico's New Government Seeks Statehood to Help End Crisis



    SAN JUAN, PUERTO RICO —
    Puerto Rico's new governor was sworn in Monday as the U.S. territory prepares for what many believe will be new austerity measures and a renewed push for statehood to haul the island out of a deep economic crisis.

    Gov. Ricardo Rossello, 37, proposed several measures aimed at alleviating the crisis shortly after he was sworn in at midnight. Among them is a proposal to hold a referendum that would ask voters whether they prefer statehood or independence. Many have argued that Puerto Rico's political status has contributed to its decade-long crisis that has prompted more than 200,000 people to flee to the U.S. mainland in recent years.

    Rossello also aims to boost public-private partnerships and use that revenue to save a retirement system that faces a $40 billion deficit and is expected to collapse in less than a year. Rossello also has pledged to work closely with a federal control board that U.S. Congress created last year to oversee Puerto Rico's finances, and he has said he supports negotiations with creditors to help restructure a nearly $70 billion public debt.

    Thousands of supporters awaited Rossello's arrival for the post-swearing-in inauguration ceremony at the island's seaside Capitol building, clutching umbrellas to protect themselves from a searing sun.

    "This is a historic moment for Puerto Rico,'' said 50-year-old Jose Davila as he waved a large flag from Rossello's pro-statehood party. "He's the hope of our island, he's the hope for statehood, he's the hope for a people that have suffered.''

    Puerto Ricans have been hit with dozens of new taxes in the past four years and increases in utility bills as former Gov. Alejandro Garcia Padilla aimed to generate more revenue for a government he said was running out of money. Despite those and other measures, the island's government has defaulted on millions of dollars' worth of bond payments and declared a state of emergency at several agencies.

    The federal control board has requested a revised fiscal plan that has to be approved by end of January, saying that the one Garcia submitted last year was in part unrealistic and relied too heavily on federal funds. Garcia had refused to submit a revised plan to include austerity measures. Rossello has said he would request an extension of that deadline as well as an extension of a moratorium that expires in February and currently protects Puerto Rico from lawsuits filed by angered creditors.

    The new governor also seeks to privatize services such as the generation of energy, establish an office to oversee and distribute federal funds to cut down on corruption, and to create financial incentives for doctors to boost the number of dwindling specialists.

    As supporters kept streaming toward the Capitol building, one yelled out, "Today, a new Puerto Rico begins!'' to the cheers of others, including those holding U.S. flags.

    Puerto Rico's New Government Seeks Statehood to Help End Crisis

  2. #2
    Thailand Expat
    Cold Pizza's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Alliance HQ
    Posts
    4,533
    I've been hearing this for years. It's almost always around some election.

    Now, it's about financial issues. After the USSR imploded and Cuba was cut-off, the US reduced aid significantly (as Cuba and PR) were cousins before the Cuban split (note the similarity in the flags).

    Here is the "legalise:"


    Legal requirements[edit]


    Under Article IV, Section Three of the United States Constitution, which outlines the relationship among the states, Congress has the power to admit new states to the union. The states are required to give "full faith and credit" to the acts of each other's legislatures and courts, which is generally held to include the recognition of legal contracts, marriages, and criminal judgments. The states are guaranteed military and civil defense by the federal government, which is also obliged by Article IV, Section Four, to "guarantee to every state in this union a republican form of government".

    Congress is a highly politicized body, and discussions about the admission of new states, which typically take years before approval, are invariably informed by the political concerns of Congress at the time the proposal is presented. These concerns include or included maintaining a balance between free and slave states, and which faction in Congress (Democrats or Republicans, conservatives or liberals, rural or urban blocks) would benefit, and which lose, if the proposed state were admitted.

    Puerto Rico has elections on the United States presidential primary or caucus of the Democratic Party and the Republican Party to select delegates to the respective parties' national conventions although presidential electors are not granted on the Electoral College. As American citizens, Puerto Ricans can vote in U.S. presidential elections, provided they reside in one of the 50 states or the District of Columbia and not in Puerto Rico itself.

    Residents of Puerto Rico pay U.S. federal taxes: import/export taxes, federal commodity taxes, social security taxes, therefore contributing to the American Government. Most Puerto Rico residents do not pay federal income tax but do pay federal payroll taxes (Social Security and Medicare). However, federal employees, those who do business with the federal government, Puerto Rico–based corporations that intend to send funds to the U.S. and others do pay federal income taxes. Puerto Ricans may enlist in the U.S. military. Puerto Ricans have participated in all American wars since 1898; 52 Puerto Ricans had been killed in the Iraq War and War in Afghanistan by November 2012.[4]

    Puerto Rico has been under U.S. sovereignty for over a century when it was ceded to the U.S. by Spain following the end of the Spanish–American War, and Puerto Ricans have been U.S. citizens since 1917. The island's ultimate status has not been determined as of 2012, its residents do not have voting representation in their federal government. Puerto Rico has limited representation in the U.S. Congress in the form of a Resident Commissioner, a delegate with limited no voting rights.[3] Like the states, Puerto Rico has self-rule, a republican form of government organized pursuant to a constitution adopted by its people, and a bill of rights.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/51st_state

  3. #3
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Chiang Mai
    Posts
    29,507
    Puerto Rico’s Resident Commissioner: Desire for statehood is clear

    Puerto Rico’s Resident Commissioner Jenniffer González-Colón touted Sunday’s vote for statehood, saying, “It is clear that the majority of Puerto Ricans want statehood.”

    Puerto Rico voted overwhelmingly in favor of statehood, 97 percent according to reports, but low turnout has some worried that opponents will be able to use that against statehood advocates.

    According to the Wall Street Journal, 97 percent voted for statehood, though turnout was only about 23 percent.

    González-Colón appeared to nod at the turnout concerns in her statement.
    “Elections are determined by those who vote, not those who don't. It is clear that the majority of Puerto Ricans want statehood. That is why leaders of certain factions urged people not to vote, as they knew that the current territorial status and nationhood were going to lose badly.”

    Puerto Rico previously voted in favor of becoming a state in 2012, but statehood opponents said the voter turnout was not high enough to accurately reflect will of the Puerto Rican people. Some fear that they will make the same case this time around.

    “I will not only lean on my colleagues and the leadership to hear the voices of these Americans, but more importantly, to respect the intent of the will of the voters. The time for Puerto Rico's equality has come", González-Colón added.

    Puerto Rico will now put its "Tennessee plan" into action, meaning its governor will choose two senators and five representatives to go to Washington, D.C., to request statehood.

    President Trump signaled during his presidential campaign that he is open to Puerto Rico officially becoming a state.

    Puerto Rico?s Resident Commissioner: Desire for statehood is clear | TheHill

  4. #4
    Thailand Expat tomcat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    10,509
    Quote Originally Posted by misskit
    Desire for statehood is clear
    Of course the desire for statehood is strong: access to federal money to cover inept island management. Puerto Ricans should, imo, seek independence, begin to wean themselves from reliance on US government handouts and finally learn how to govern responsibly and not follow the usual Caribbean model of corruption, nepotism, narrow-mindedness and near-complete disregard for the local population. It's time for Yellow Bird to fly away with the Yankee Dollah.
    Last edited by tomcat; 12-06-2017 at 09:13 AM.
    Majestically enthroned amid the vulgar herd

  5. #5
    Thailand Expat
    Cold Pizza's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Alliance HQ
    Posts
    4,533
    Quote Originally Posted by tomcat View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by misskit
    Desire for statehood is clear
    Of course the desire for statehood is strong: access to federal money to cover inept island management. Puerto Ricans should, imo, seek independence, begin to wean themselves from reliance on US government handouts and finally learn how to govern responsibly and not follow the usual Caribbean model of corruption, nepotism, narrow-mindedness and near-complete disregard for the local population. It's time for Yellow Bird to fly away with the Yankee Dollah.
    I was surprised by the amount of US welfare PR is currently getting.

    $6.5 billion per year.

    Federal aid[edit]
    Puerto Rico received more than $6.5 billion annually in federal aid from the United States.[1] A substantial portion of this amount is earmarked for public welfare, including funding educational programs (such as Head Start), subsidized housing programs (such as (Section 8 and public housing projects), and a food stamp system called the Nutrition Assistance for Puerto Rico program.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Welfare_in_Puerto_Rico

  6. #6
    Thailand Expat tomcat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    10,509
    Puerto Rico tends to export to the US its talented and wealthy...thus defeating its ability to fully utilize its potential...add short-sighted local leadership and the usual Caribbean mess is the result...

  7. #7
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Chiang Mai
    Posts
    29,507
    Compared to other Caribbean islands, Puerto Rico seems much more wealthy. Even San Juan's La Perla slum is beautiful.

  8. #8
    Thailand Expat tomcat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    10,509
    Quote Originally Posted by misskit
    Compared to other Caribbean islands, Puerto Rico seems much more wealthy
    Other Caribbean islands don't have access to the US Treasury...

  9. #9
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Chiang Mai
    Posts
    29,507
    Dats right.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •