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  1. #1
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    Saudi Arabia launches air strikes in Yemen

    Looks like the Iranians are being brought into the fold now

    Saudi Arabia has launched air strikes in Yemen against Shia Houthi rebels, the Saudi ambassador in the US has said.
    Adel al-Jubeir said Saudi Arabia acted to "defend the legitimate government" of President Abdrabbuh Mansour Hadi.
    Supporters of President Hadi say that they recaptured Aden airport on Thursday after heavy fighting with forces allied to Houthi fighters.
    The Iran-backed rebels have made rapid gains in recent months.
    They have forced Mr Hadi to flee the capital Sanaa.

    Damage caused by Saudi air strikes in Sanaa was clear to see on Thursday morning
    News footage of the strikes broadcast by Saudi-owned Al-Hadath TV showed flashing lights and apparent machine gun fire.
    Meanwhile Mohammed al-Bukhaiti, a senior Houthi rebel, warned that the Saudi operation amounted to an aggression against Yemen and could set off a "wide war" in the region, according to Reuters news agency.
    Saudi Arabia is supplying 100 warplanes and 150,000 soldiers for the operation, Saudi-owned al-Arabiya television reported on Thursday.
    Jordanian officials say that its air force jets are taking part in the operation.
    In addition the Saudi Press Agency (SPA) said that the operation had the support of Sudan, Morocco, Egypt and Pakistan which were willing if necessary to take part.
    Earlier Mr Hadi appealed to members of the Gulf Co-operation Council (GCC) to intervene.
    SPA said GCC members Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Kuwait, Qatar and the United Arab Emirates agreed to answer President Hadi's call for help.
    Security compromised
    In the US, White House spokeswoman Bernadette Meehan said President Barack Obama had authorised logistical and intelligence support for the operation.
    But she stressed that "US forces are not taking direct military action in Yemen".
    Recent developments have also raised fears that Iran - Saudi Arabia's regional rival - could be drawn into the conflict.
    In a separate development, reports said the Houthi rebels had seized secret US intelligence files describing US operations in Yemen.
    The files reportedly contained informants' identities as well as counter-terrorism operation plans, the Los Angeles Times reported.
    Quoting two unnamed US officials, the paper says that the identities of local agents are considered to be compromised after Houthi leaders in Sanaa took over the offices of the National Security Bureau, which had worked closely with the CIA and other intelligence agencies.
    "For American intelligence networks in Yemen, the damage has been severe," the LA Times says.
    'Ransom for president'
    Speaking in Washington on Wednesday, Mr Jubeir said the Saudi operation began at 23:00
    Mr Jubeir stressed that the Saudis "will do anything necessary'' to protect the people of the neighbouring Yemen and "the legitimate government of Yemen".
    This come despite sources in Saudi Arabia telling Reuters earlier on Wednesday that there were no plans for military intervention in the crisis, and that the reported build-up of military forces on its border with Yemen was "purely defensive".
    Mr Jubeir also said Gulf states supported the Saudi operation.
    Armed Yemeni militiamen loyal to President Hadi, also known as the Popular Resistance Committees, stand guard outside the international airport in Aden (19 March 2015)
    Militiamen loyal to President Hadi say that they have retaken the international airport in Aden
    The embattled Yemeni president also asked the UN Security Council to back military action by "willing countries" against the Houthi rebels.
    Also on Wednesday, reports said Mr Hadi fled his palace in Aden as the rebels advanced towards the southern port city.
    But Yemeni government officials denied suggestions that the president has fled the country, and said he remained in Aden.
    Meanwhile, Yemen's state television, which is controlled by the rebels, announced a ransom for anyone who captures the "fugitive" president.
    line
    Yemen - who is fighting whom?
    Tribal fighters loyal to President Abdrabbuh Mansour Hadi stand on a tank in Lahj, Yemen (23 March 2015)
    The Houthis: Zaidi Shia-led rebels from the north, who seized control of Sanaa last year and have since been expanding their control
    President Hadi: Backed by military and police loyalists, and by militia known as Popular Resistance Committees, he is trying to fight back against the rebels from his stronghold in the south
    Al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula: Seen by the US as the most dangerous offshoot of al-Qaeda, AQAP opposes both the Houthis and President Hadi.
    Islamic State: A Yemeni affiliate of IS has recently emerged, which seeks to eclipse AQAP.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-32061632
    Last edited by Horatio Hornblower; 26-03-2015 at 05:49 PM.

  2. #2
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    SAUDI AIRSTRIKES TARGET REBEL BASES IN YEMEN
    BY AHMED AL-HAJ
    ASSOCIATED PRESS





    LATEST NEWS
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    SANAA, Yemen (AP) -- Saudi Arabia bombed key military installations in Yemen on Thursday after announcing a broad regional coalition to oust Shiite rebels that forced the country's embattled president to flee. Some of the strikes hit positions in the country's capital, Sanaa, and flattened a number of homes near the international airport.

    The airstrikes, which had the support of nine other countries, drew a strong reaction from Iran which called the operation an "invasion" and a "dangerous step" that will worsen the crisis in the country.

    Iran "condemns the airstrikes against Yemen this morning that left some innocent Yemenis wounded and dead and considers this action a dangerous step," Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Marzieh Afkham said in a statement. She said military action would complicate and worsen the crisis in Yemen.

    "This invasion will bear no result but expansion of terrorism and extremism throughout the whole region," she said.

    The Saudi airstrikes came hours after President Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi, a close U.S. ally, fled Yemen by sea after rebels pushed their way toward the southern port city of Aden where he had taken refuge.

    The back-and-forth between the regional heavyweights was threatening to turn impoverished Yemen into a proxy battle between the Middle East's Sunni powers and Shiite-led Iran.

    Saudi-owned Al-Arabiya News reported that the kingdom had deployed 100 fighter jets, 150,000 soldiers and other navy units in "Operation Decisive Storm."

    The Shiite rebels, known as Houthis, were calling on their supporters to protest in the streets of Sanaa on Thursday afternoon, Yemen's Houthi-controlled state news agency SABA reported. TV stations affiliated with the rebels and their ally, former President Ali Abdullah Saleh, showed the aftermath of the strikes Thursday morning in what appeared to be a residential area.

    Al-Masirah TV, affiliated with the Houthis, quoted the ministry of health as saying that 18 civilians were killed and 24 were injured.

    Yemen Today, a TV station affiliated with Saleh, showed hundreds of residents congregating around a number of flattened houses, some chanting "Death to Al-Saud", in reference to the kingdom's royal family. The civilians were sifting through the rubble, pulling out mattresses, bricks and shrapnel.

    An Associated Press reporter on the scene in the Sanaa neighborhood near the international airport saw people searching for loved ones in the debris of flattened homes. Residents said at least three bodies were pulled from the rubble. There were traces of blood between the bricks.

    Ahmed al-Sumaini said an entire alley close to the airport was wiped out in the strikes overnight. He said people ran out from their homes in the middle of the night. "This was a surprise. I was asleep and I was jolted out of my bed," he said, waving a piece of shrapnel.

    In addition to the airport, targets included the camp of U.S.-trained Yemeni special forces, which is controlled by generals loyal to Saleh. Yemeni security officials said the targets also included a missile base in Sanaa that was controlled by the Houthis earlier this year. One of the security officials said the strikes also targeted the fuel depot at the base.

    The Houthis said in a statement that Saudi jets hit the military base, known as al-Duleimi, and that they responded with anti-aircraft missiles.

    The strikes also hit the al-Annad air base in the southern Lahj province. About 100 U.S. military advisers withdrew over the weekend from base, where they had been leading a drone campaign against al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula, or AQAP.

    The crumbling of Hadi's government is a blow to Washington's counterterrorism strategy against al-Qaida's branch in Yemen, considered to be the most powerful in the terrorist network.

    The security officials spoke on condition of anonymity, because they were not authorized to brief journalists.

    Riad Yassin, Yemen's foreign minister, told Saudi's Al-Hadath TV that the airstrikes were welcomed.

    "I hope the Houthis listen to the sound of reason. With what is happening, they forced us into this," he said.

    Saudi ambassador to the United States Adel al-Jubeir announced the military operation in a news conference in Washington. He said his government had consulted closely with the U.S. and other allies but that the U.S. military was not involved in the operations.

    The White House said in a statement late Wednesday that the U.S. was coordinating military and intelligence support with the Saudis but not taking part directly in the strikes.

    Other regional players were involved in the Saudi operation: The United Arab Emirates, Kuwait, Qatar and Bahrain joined Saudi Arabia in a statement published by the Saudi Press Agency, saying they would answer a request from Hadi "to protect Yemen and his dear people from the aggression of the Houthi militias which were and are still a tool in the hands of foreign powers that don't stop meddling with the security and stability of brotherly Yemen." Oman, the sixth member of the Gulf Cooperation Council, didn't sign onto the statement.

    Egypt also announced political and military support, saying it is ready to send ground troops if necessary. Jordan confirmed it was participating in the operation. Pakistan, Morocco and Sudan were also taking part, the Saudi Press Agency reported Thursday.

    Saudi Arabia and its Gulf allies believe the Houthis are tools for Iran to seize control of Yemen and say they intend to stop the takeover. The Houthis deny they are backed by Iran.

    Yemen now faces fragmentation, with Houthis controlling much of the north, including the capital of Sanaa, and several southern provinces. In recent days, they took the third-largest city, Taiz, as well as much of the province of Lahj, both just to the north of Aden.

    The Houthis are backed by Saleh, the autocrat who ruled Yemen for three decades until he was removed amid a 2011 Arab Spring uprising. Some of the best-equipped and trained military and security units remained loyal to Saleh and they have helped the Houthis in their rapid advance.

    Hadi left Sanaa for Aden earlier this month after escaping house arrest under the Houthis, who overran the capital six months ago. In Aden, he had sought to make a last stand, claiming it as the temporary seat of what remained of his government, backed by allied militias and loyal army units.

    With Houthis and Saleh forces closing in on multiple fronts, Hadi and his aides left Aden Wednesday on two boats in the Gulf of Aden, security and port officials told AP. The officials would not specify his destination.

    Arab leaders are meeting in Egypt this weekend for a pre-planned summit. It is unclear if Hadi will join them.

    News from The Associated Press

  3. #3
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    Yemen conflict: Saudis warn border civilians to leave

    Saudi-led coalition aircraft have dropped leaflets warning residents in a Yemeni border district to leave, as air strikes against Houthi rebels continue.

    Leaflets were dropped in Old Saada in Saada province, the rebels' stronghold.

    Houthi rebels have fired shells from Saada into Saudi Arabia in recent days, killing 10 people.

    But the NGO Medecins sans Frontieres, which has a team in Saada, warned people would not be able to leave the city quickly because of fuel shortages.

    Saudi Arabia says the offensive aims to restore Yemen's exiled president.

    The spokesman for the Saudi-led coalition, Brig Gen Ahmad Assiri, said Yemenis were being advised to stay away from Houthi strongholds for their own safety.

    Mr Assiri said the overnight air strikes in Saada province were aimed at those behind the attacks on Saudi territory.

    "Our work now is reaching those [Houthis] who planned these attacks and who are hiding in Saada, and the places where the militias are," Gen Assiri told Saudi TV.



    The latest strikes hit Houthi command-and-control centres, said the Saudi state news agency SPA. Residents said the tomb of the Houthi movement's founder, Hussein al-Houthi, was also hit.

    Earlier, Gen Assiri warned of "harsh" retaliation for a cross-border shelling attack by the rebels on the Saudi city of Najran on Wednesday.

    But MSF said it had five staff working in a hospital in Saada, and urged Saudi Arabia not to attack the city.

    Llanos Ortiz, an emergency co-ordinator with the NGO in the neighbouring Hajjah province, said: "It is impossible for the entire population of Saada province to leave within hours.

    "Many people have no transport or fuel due to the coalition's blockade. Many others have no access to information as the province's phone networks are barely operational.

    "If the coalition goes ahead with the threat of massively bombing the province, many people will die under the bombs."

    Aid ceasefire
    At a meeting in Paris on Friday, Saudi Foreign Minister Adel al-Jubeir said a five-day humanitarian ceasefire would start at 23:00 local time (20:00 GMT) on 12 May.

    A letter signed by 22 charities on Thursday called instead for a permanent end to the fighting.

    A senior Houthi official, Mohamed al-Bukhaiti, told BBC Arabic on Friday that the ceasefire had not been formally proposed and the Houthis would not respond until a plan was properly laid out.

    Air strikes have killed at least 1,200 people, more than half civilians, the UN says.

    The crisis began when Shia Houthi rebels from the north, backed by forces loyal to Yemen's former president, took over the capital Sanaa late last year, and have since expanded their control.

    Sunni Muslim Saudi Arabia has accused Shia rival Iran of arming the Houthis, a charge Iran and the Houthis deny.

    The Saudis have been sheltering the internationally recognised Yemeni President Mansour Abdrabbuh Hadi, who fled there in March.

    Yemen conflict: Saudis warn border civilians to leave - BBC News
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    Yemen conflict: UN criticises Saudi civilian bombings

    The United Nations representative in Yemen has said that the Saudi-led coalition is bombing "effectively, trapped civilians".

    Civilians in the northern city of Saada are struggling to flee Saudi-led coalition air strikes targeting Houthi rebels, reports and aid workers say.

    The UN also warned that the indiscriminate bombing of populated areas is against international law.

    Air strikes have killed at least 1,400, more than half civilians, the UN says.

    On Sunday morning air strikes in Sanaa targeted the home of former Yemeni President Al Abdullah Saleh, according the Yemeni news agency Khabar. The report adds that the former president and his family are unharmed.

    Mr Saleh is allied with the Houthi rebels and has been accused by the coalition of destabilising the country.

    The UN's humanitarian coordinator for Yemen, Johannes Van Der Klauuw, said he was "deeply concerned" by the impact of the latest air strikes on northern Yemen.

    "Many civilians are effectively trapped in Saada as they are unable to access transport because of the fuel shortage," he added.

    The medical charity MSF, say that shortages mean many people can only flee on foot.

    The Saudi-led coalition says it consider all of Saada a "military zone". On Friday it dropped leaflets warning residents to leave.

    Mr Van Der Klauuw said that the decision to target the entire province "will put countless civilians at risk".

    In a statement he added that many of Saada's residents were effectively trapped due to a lack of transport and that the leaflet warnings did not absolve the coalition of its responsibility not to target civilians.

    Yemen conflict: UN criticises Saudi civilian bombings - BBC News

  5. #5
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    Can you imagine the kerfuffle if Iran chose to bomb the enemy?


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    ^ It would be a walloping. The Iranians do not have the balls.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bsnub View Post
    ^ It would be a walloping. The Iranians do not have the balls.
    A walloping by Saudi?

    You're having a laugh.


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    Quote Originally Posted by bsnub View Post
    ^ It would be a walloping. The Iranians do not have the balls.
    ...or, they're on the watch list and an official boogieman.

    Can't blame 'em for not wanting to push the envelope - even if they have the ability to do so.
    Last edited by thaimeme; 10-05-2015 at 06:51 PM.

  9. #9
    I am in Jail

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    what he really means is a USA backed Saudi.then again would they dare.?


    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by bsnub View Post
    ^ It would be a walloping. The Iranians do not have the balls.
    A walloping by Saudi?

    You're having a laugh.


  10. #10
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    Give me a break on this PC SHIT, when are the SO CALLED good MUSLIMS going to do ANYTHING to really stop this SHIT? When are THEY going to KILL IS?


    NEVER, because it increases profits for the BIG COMPAIES.

    We are nothing but pawns like sand on the beach to them.
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  11. #11
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    Saudi arms 'investigation' needed, says Philip Hammond

    Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond has called for "proper investigations" into Saudi airstrikes in Yemen.

    He said UK weapons are being used and Saudi assurances of compliance with humanitarian law are "not enough".

    UK sales to the Kingdom would halt if they are found to have breached international law.

    "We need to work with the Saudis to establish that international humanitarian law has been complied with - and we have an export licensing system that responds if we find that it has not. We will then find that we cannot license additional shipments of weapons."

    Josephine Hutton, Middle East programme manager at Oxfam, welcomed what she called a "change of heart from the government".

    She said: "The humanitarian crisis in Yemen is worsening by the day. Civilians are in the firing line, not only by weapons but also by the ever-tightening blockade which is strangling the country's essential services and its economy. Britain needs to put all its diplomatic weight behind the push for peace."

    The war in Yemen escalated in March, when a coalition led by Saudi Arabia entered the conflict on the side of the internationally recognised government to try to oust Houthi rebels from the capital Sana'a and other areas. All sides have been accused of targeting civilians.

    Oxfam, Amnesty International and other organisations have called on the UK and the US to suspend the sale of weapons to Saudi Arabia while "damning evidence of war crimes" is investigated.

    Saudi Arabia is Britain's biggest market for defence exports, worth $1.7bn (1.1bn) last year, according to IHS's Global Defence Trade Report.

    Mr Hammond said the UK operated "one of the strictest export licensing regimes in the world".

    "We only export weapons systems where all the criteria of our export licensing system are met," he told Newsnight.

    David Cameron's government has championed the UN Arms Trade Treaty, which came into force in December and which prohibits states from exporting weapons that would be used for war crimes.

    In a letter to the Daily Telegraph last month, Saudi Arabia's ambassador to the UK noted an "alarming change" in Britain's attitude towards his country, which he warned could lead to "serious consequences".

    Saudi arms 'investigation' needed, says Philip Hammond - BBC News

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