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  1. #1
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    King Juan Carlos of Spain abdicating



    Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy (r) announced King Juan Carlos' (l) decision


    King Juan Carlos of Spain is abdicating, Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy has announced.

    Juan Carlos, who is 76, has ruled since 1975, taking over after the death of dictator Francisco Franco.

    The king's son, Crown Prince Felipe, 45, will take over the throne.

    For much of his reign, Juan Carlos was seen as one of the world's most popular monarchs, but recently many Spaniards have lost confidence in him.

    His reputation has been tarnished by a long-running corruption investigation into his daughter and her husband.

    Support for the king fell further when it was discovered he had been on a lavish elephant hunting trip to Botswana in April 2012, in the middle of Spain's financial crisis.

    The king gave a rare interview in Jan 2013 on the eve of his 75th birthday


    "His Majesty King Juan Carlos has just informed me of his desire to renounce the throne and begin the process of succession," Mr Rajoy said in a short statement.

    He gave no reason for the decision, saying the monarch himself would explain, but Juan Carlos' health is failing and he has had a number of hip operations in recent years.

    Spain does not have a precise law regulating abdication and royal succession, and Mr Rajoy said ministers would hold a special meeting to discuss the process by which the prince would take over as Felipe VI.

    The prime minister said Juan Carlos had been a "tireless defender of our interests".

    "I'm convinced this is the best moment for change," he added.


    Pivotal role

    When Juan Carlos took over from General Franco, he became Spain's first crowned head of state for 44 years.



    Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy announced the abdication

    But he soon ignored Franco's supporters, who wanted an extension to autocratic rule, and ushered in a new system of parliamentary monarchy.

    As the years went on the king involved himself less in day-to-day politics, and became more of a figurehead.

    He has been credited as a stabilising force for independence-minded areas such as Catalonia and the Basque region, and he also helped defuse an attempted coup in 1981.

    Until a few years ago his popularity was high, but the hunting trip and corruption allegations involving his youngest daughter, Cristina, and her husband Inaki Urdangarin, led to calls for him to step aside.

    The king's son and successor, Felipe, appears to have been untarnished by the scandal.

    Felipe and his wife - former television presenter Princess Letizia - have recently taken on more important roles in ceremonial events


    BBC News - King Juan Carlos of Spain abdicating

  2. #2
    Thailand Expat KEVIN2008's Avatar
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    This could mean war. All of Europe will be ablaze!

    We must raise an army and fortify our coastline!



  3. #3
    Thailand Expat KEVIN2008's Avatar
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    Here’s how the Irish Daily Mirror reported it:


  4. #4
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    Another Juan bites the dust.

  5. #5
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    This event is an interesting precedent for another country. I mean UK, of course.

  6. #6
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    Its been announced the Aussies are conducting another refereremdum, the sydney morning herald stated today the fed govt are once again throwing money to the wind.

    This morning British flags were being Hung around the govt house in canberra, with signs saying GOD save Lizzie are Gracious Queen.

    Armed Troops loyal to the Monarch were seen surrounding King st Sydney in case ocker protesters should decide to counter, general Ned Kelly announced to all shoppers, if you don't ferk off the streets all will be robbed and shot and days gone by would return

    The troops were seen handing out Tinnies and Meat pies.

    High st stores informed the media sales of British flags had ran out and were asking the Kiwis and other commonwealth countries if they had any to supply the aussies with the kiwi govt are reported to of informed the canberra govt, only if you allow all the Maoris enter the commonwealth country.
    Last edited by Yasojack; 04-06-2014 at 08:07 AM.

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  • #8
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    Largarse Juan

  • #9
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    Support for the king fell further when it was discovered he had been on a lavish elephant hunting trip to Botswana in April 2012, in the middle of Spain's financial crisis.
    RickThai being his trusty manservant and guide?

    Doubt he would have been sticking spears in it, Toreador-style. Cnut.

  • #10
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    Patrick Smyth Welcome to the club of reigning royals - World News | Latest International News Headlines | The Irish Times - Sun, Jun 15, 2014


    When crown prince Felipe is enthroned next Thursday in Madrid to succeed his father King Juan Carlos, he will join the ranks of a perhaps surprisingly long-lasting and vigorous, however anachronistic and undemocratic, international club of reigning monarchs.
    Most, like himself, have little power but some significant political influence and act as largely ceremonial heads of state, many playing what their supporters see as important roles unifying their peoples, perhaps most significantly in countries under serious political strain, like Thailand and Jordan.

    In Juan Carlos’s case, he is credited with easing the transition to democracy from the era of fascism and Franco. By one not uncontroversial reading of history, that is.
    Most monarchs are enormously wealthy – according to the Business Spectator, the king of Thailand and the sultan of Brunei have a combined fortune of €37 billion. Queen Elizabeth has a personal net worth of a mere €370 million as of April 2012, according to the Sunday Times Rich List, while the wealth of the Spanish royal family is treated like a state secret.

    Abdullah bin Abdulaziz Al Saud, king of Saudi Arabia, is worth a reputed €13 billion. One of the 45 sons of the first monarch of that state, he owes his fortune to his country’s ownership of 18 per cent of the world’s oil trade.
    ‘We’re a firm’
    In the The King’s Speech, George VI observes sarcastically to his father: “We’re not a family, we’re a firm.” The House of Windsor is not alone.
    Felipe’s accession is also part of a relatively new modern trend of succeeding to abdicating monarchs, and follows similar moves last year in both the Netherlands and Belgium, And, of course, the groundbreaking succession in the Holy See of its new “monarch”, Pope Francis, to a still-living predecessor.
    A tally by John Rees, professor of politics in the University of Notre Dame in Australia, shows there are 28 sovereigns across 43 countries in the world (including the 16 sovereign domains of the British monarch). That’s over one-fifth of the UN’s 193 member states. And that does not include local and religious royalty like the influential Zulu king, the patriarchs of the Orthodox churches, or the Aga Khan, Prince Shah Karim Al Husseini, spiritual leader of the worldwide community of Ismaili Shia Muslims, all important international political figures.
    Twelve monarchies still survive in Europe, though this includes curiosities such as Andorra – uniquely it is ruled by two sovereigns, the French president, the only monarch in the world to be elected by common citizens(though not those of Andorra) and the bishop of Urgell. Then there’s the Holy See, the tiny principalities of Monaco and Liechtenstein, and Belgium, Britain, Denmark, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain and Sweden.

    Liberal democracies
    For the most part they are among Europe’s most liberal democracies, unlike the authoritarian, and often very brutal, monarchies of the Middle East, not least Saudi, or the likes of Brunei, whose Sultan Haji Hassanal Bolkiah Mu’izzaddin Waddaulah ibni Al-Marhum Sultan Haji Omar Ali Saifuddien Sa’adul Khairi Waddien – “Sultan” to his friends – has recently provoked international protests by supporters of gay rights after his imposition of a harsh form of Sharia law.
    In Thailand, whose democracy is regularly punctuated by military coups, aged King Bhumibol Adulyadej, after almost seven decades on the throne, has a semi-divine status, protected from any public criticism by tough and enforced lèse majesté laws. His involvement in politics is supposedly marginal, but his endorsement of the latest coup will guarantee its stability and is a clear sign he favours the opposition.
    In the royal democracies the institution remains reasonably popular. Republicanism thrives, particularly at times of succession debates, but is largely a minority viewpoint, probably at its strongest in Australia. In Spain 20,000 people demonstrated after the Juan Carlos abdication demanding the abolition of the monarchy. An El Pais poll shows some 62 per cent favour a referendum on the issue, but a clear majority would vote to retain the institution.
    In the Scottish referendum the issue has acquired some salience, with Alex Salmond dragging his largely republican SNP into an Arthur Griffith-like promise that an independent Scotland would share a double-crowned monarch with the UK. Other republican Yes campaigners suggest a referendum would be the first business of a new Scottish parliament.
    What is remarkable, however, is the extent to which this quaint institution, the hereditary monarchy, a symbol of privilege in a largely egalitarian world, a redundant, profoundly undemocratic relic of medieval times, still thrives in so many modern societies and in many cases is so important in different ways to their political life.

  • #11
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    Interesting article.

  • #12
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    He probably just wants to shoot a few more elephants without all the fuss.

  • #13
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    A form of governance perhaps well past its prime.

    People want more freedom to govern their own lives, in many parts of the world. Even Africa have been getting its act together.

  • #14
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    The sheer ungratefulness of the Spaniards towards their majesty the king is sobering, yet a logical consequence of liberalism and the degradation of values coming with it. They should learn a lesson from Thailand whose people gifted the world's largest diamond to his majesty the king in gratitude for his tireless service for his great nation and its people.

    Boon Mee: 'Israel is the 51st State. De facto - but none the less, essentially part & parcel of the USA.'

  • #15
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    Had to smile and like this....

    Quote Originally Posted by Yasojack View Post
    Its been announced the Aussies are conducting another refereremdum, the sydney morning herald stated today the fed govt are once again throwing money to the wind.

    This morning British flags were being Hung around the govt house in canberra, with signs saying GOD save Lizzie are Gracious Queen.

    Armed Troops loyal to the Monarch were seen surrounding King st Sydney in case ocker protesters should decide to counter, general Ned Kelly announced to all shoppers, if you don't ferk off the streets all will be robbed and shot and days gone by would return

    The troops were seen handing out Tinnies and Meat pies.

    High st stores informed the media sales of British flags had ran out and were asking the Kiwis and other commonwealth countries if they had any to supply the aussies with the kiwi govt are reported to of informed the canberra govt, only if you allow all the Maoris enter the commonwealth country.

  • #16
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    Los ultimos dias... Sad, Spain being one of the nicer places in euroland.

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