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  1. #1
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    Ukraine leader warns Russia after armed men seize government HQ in Crimea

    (Reuters) - Armed men seized the regional government headquarters and parliament on Ukraine's Crimea peninsula on Thursday and raised the Russian flag.

    A Reuters correspondent on the scene in the Crimean capital, Simferopol, said the door of the parliament was blockaded from inside by tables and chairs and no one was now able to enter.

    Interfax news agency quoted a witness as saying there were about 60 people inside and that they had many weapons. It said no one had been hurt when the buildings were seized in the early hours of Thursday.

    "I heard gunfire in the night, came down and saw lots of people going in. Some then left. I'm not sure how many are still in there," a 30-year-old man who gave his name only as Roman told Reuters.

    Crimea, the only Ukrainian region with an ethnic Russian majority, is the last big bastion of opposition to the new political leadership in Kiev following the ouster of President Viktor Yanukovich on Saturday.

    Ukraine's new leaders have been voicing alarm over signs of separatism there. The seizure of the building was confirmed by the country's acting interior minister, Ukrainian television said, but he gave few details.

    Russian President Vladimir Putin has ignored calls by some ethnic Russians in Crimea to reclaim the territory handed to then Soviet Ukraine by Soviet Communist leader Nikita Khrushchev in 1954.

    The United States says any Russian military action would be a grave mistake.

    Ethnic Tatars who support Ukraine's new leaders and pro-Russia separatists had confronted each other outside the regional parliament on Wednesday.

    A local Tatar leader, Refat Chubarov, said on Facebook: "I have been told that the buildings of parliament and the council of ministers have been occupied by armed men in uniforms that do not bear any recognizable insignia."

    "They have not yet made any demands," he said.

    About 100 police were gathered in front of the parliament building. Doors into the building appeared to have been blocked by wooden crates.

    The streets around the parliament were mostly empty apart from people going to work.

    Yanukovich was ousted after three months of unrest led by protesters in Kiev. He is now on the run being sought by the new authorities for murder in connection with the deaths of around 100 people during the conflict.

    With a part of Russia's Black Sea fleet based in the port of Sevastopol, Crimea it is the only region of Ukraine where ethnic Russians dominate in numbers, although many ethnic Ukrainians in other eastern areas speak Russian as their first language.

    The Tatars, a Turkic ethnic group, were victimized by Soviet dictator Josef Stalin in World War Two and deported en masse to Soviet Central Asia in 1944 on suspicion of collaborating with Nazi Germany.

    Tens of thousands of them returned to their homeland after Ukraine gained independence with the collapse of the Soviet Union at the end of 1991.

    Armed men seize government HQ in Ukraine's Crimea, raise Russian flag | Reuters

  2. #2
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    That's gonna go down well with the Ukrainians...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bettyboo View Post
    That's gonna go down well with the Ukrainians...
    They are Ukranians.

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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Bettyboo View Post
    That's gonna go down well with the Ukrainians...
    They are Ukranians.

    It seems they don't see it that way. Raising the russian flag and all.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Takeovers View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Bettyboo View Post
    That's gonna go down well with the Ukrainians...
    They are Ukranians.

    It seems they don't see it that way. Raising the russian flag and all.
    That's because they support Russia, no big surprise is it?

    But they're not looking at emigrating are they?

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    Long post here but worth a read, although it is from RT so there might be a bit of spin on it:



    Facts you need to know about Crimea and why it is in turmoil
    Published time: February 27, 2014 04:51
    Edited time: February 27, 2014 07:45 Get short URL


    With its multinational society and a long history of conquests, the Crimean peninsula has always been a crossroads of cultures – and a hotbed of conflicts. Amid Ukrainian turmoil, every ethnic group of Crimeans has its own vision of the region’s future.

    What is Crimea?
    Now known as Autonomous Republic of Crimea, the picturesque peninsula shooting out into Black Sea from mainland Ukraine was for centuries colonized and conquered by historic empires and nomadic tribes. Greeks, Scythians, Byzantians and the Genoese have all left traces of their presence in Crimean archeological sites and placenames. Nomadic invasions, such as that of the Goths and the Huns, oftentimes redrew the ethnic picture of the region.

    The most long-lived, however, proved to be the conquest of the peninsula by Turko-Mongols, who settled in the region, mixing with indigenous and other Turkic people already living there and in 1441 formed the Crimean Khanate. The local Turkic-speaking population became known as the Crimean Tatars. While the Khanate proclaimed its independence from the Golden Horde, it soon became a Turkish protectorate.

    How does Russia come into the picture?
    The Crimean Khanate became notorious for its brutal and perpetual slave raids into East Slavic lands, in which tens of thousands of people were captured annually on Russian, Polish-Lithuanian and later Ukrainian territories. The Crimean-Nogai raids made up the Khanate’s economy through a massive slave trade with the Ottoman Empire and the Middle East. They also caused vast steppe territories, known as the Wild Fields, to be unpopulated for centuries.

    As the Tsardom of Russia grew stronger, one of the most vital issues for its rulers was to protect the southern borders against the raids. For this purpose, Moscow accepted the loyalty of Cossack-ruled Zaporizhian Sich, which also proved to be a defining moment in the formation of present-day Ukraine.

    The Russian Empire eventually did away with its historical rival in the 18th century as a result of several victorious Russo-Turkish wars. As part of the 1774 Kuchuk-Kainarji peace treaty the Crimean Khanate aligned itself with Russia, but Catherine the Great soon annexed its lands, giving them a historic Greek name of Taurida.

    During the Crimean War of 1853–1856, the peninsula again became a major theater of war. The Russian Empire lost the war to Ottoman Empire’s British and French allies following the bloody Siege of Sevastopol, but retained Crimea due to success on Turkish front. Despite the defeat and total devastation of the city, the heroic 11-month long defense of Sevastopol became known as an iconic event in Russian history, which has ever since been associated with the courage of the Russian military.

    Later on during World War II, Sevastopol’s heroic struggle against Nazi Germany earned it the title of Hero City, reinforcing its special historic status for the Russians. As the war ended, the city had to be completely rebuilt for the second time in its history.

    Ethnic controversy
    By the beginning of the 20th century, Russians and the Crimean Tatars were equally predominant ethnic groups in Crimea, followed by Ukrainian, Jewish and other minorities. Crimea was both a royal resort and an inspiration for some of the great Russian poets, writers and artists, some of whom lived or were born there.

    The turmoil of the Russian Civil War gravely affected the region, bringing both the notorious “Red Terror” and a severely weakened economy, which caused the Crimean population to be unable to cope with the great famine of 1921–1923. Of the famine’s 100,000 victims some 75,000 were Crimean Tatars, mainly because they relied on livestock breeding in mountainous areas with very limited lands and did not grow many crops.

    Still, even more disastrous for Crimean Tatars was the aftermath of the WWII, in which some 20,000 of them allied with the Nazi German occupants, but many others also fought the Germans within the Soviet Army. Citing the collaboration of Crimean Tatars with the Nazis, Joseph Stalin ordered the whole ethnic group to be deported from Crimea to several Central Asian Soviet republics. Officially, 183,155 people were deported from Crimea, followed by about 9,000 Crimean Tatar WWII veterans. That made up about 19 percent of the Crimean population on the eve of war, almost half of which was by then Russian.

    While the move was officially criticized by the communist leadership as early as in 1967, the Tatars were de-facto unable to return to Crimea until the late 1980s. The tragic events surrounding Stalin’s deportation obviously shaped the ethnic group’s detestation of the Soviet regime.

    Other Soviet citizens got to know Crimea as an “all-Union health resort,” with many of those born in the Soviet Union sharing nostalgic memories of children’s holiday camps and seaside.

    How was Crimea separated from Russia?
    Another controversial decision involving Crimea followed in 1954, when Nikita Khrushchev, himself an ethnic Ukrainian, transferred the peninsula to the Ukrainian SSR, extracting it from Russian territory.

    Following the breakup of the Soviet Union, Khrushchev’s “present” has been widely criticized by many Russians, including the majority of those living in the Autonomous Republic of Crimea.

    Adding to the confusion was also the status of Soviet-times Sevastopol, which not only remained the largest Crimean city, but also retained its special strategic and military profile. In 1948, Sevastopol was separated from the surrounding region and made directly subordinate to Moscow. Serving as an important Soviet naval base, it used to be a “closed city” for years.

    In the 1990s, the status of Sevastopol became the subject of endless debates between Russia and Ukraine. Following negotiations, the city with the surrounding territories was granted a special “state significance” status within the Ukrainian state, and some of the naval facilities were leased to Russia for its Black Sea Fleet until at least 2047. However, the city’s Russian majority and some outspoken Russian politicians still consider it to be a part of Russia.

    Referendums and hopes
    In 1991, the people of Crimea took part in several referendums. One proclaimed the region an Autonomous Republic within the Soviet Union, with 93.26 percent of the voters supporting the move. As the events unfolded fast, another one was already asking if the Crimeans supported the independence of Ukraine from the Soviet Union – a question that gathered 54 percent support. However, a referendum on Crimea’s independence from Ukraine was indefinitely banned from being held, leading critics to assert that their lawful rights were oppressed by Kiev authorities.

    Complicating the issue was the return of the Crimean Tatars, who not only started to resettle in tens of thousands, but also rivaled local authorities. The Mejlis of the Crimean Tatar People was formed to represent the rights and interests of the ethnic minority. Although it was never officially recognized as an official organization, the body has enjoyed undisputed authority over most of Crimean Tatars and has successfully pushed for some concessions for the ethnic group in local laws.

    While the Crimean Tatar re-settlers and the peninsula’s current Russian majority have learned to understand one another as neighbors, hardcore politicians from both ethnic groups also created grounds for a heated standoff. Calls for wider autonomy and aggressive lobbying for Crimean Tatar rights have prompted several pro-Russian Crimean political leaders to call the Mejlis an “organized criminal group” leading “unconstitutional” activities. The remarks sparked furious claims of “discrimination” from the Crimean Tatar community.

    Who lives there now?
    The majority of those living in Crimea today are ethnic Russians – almost 1,200,000 or around 58.3 percent of the populations, according to the latest national census conducted back in 2001. Some 24 percent are Ukrainians (around 500,000) and 12 percent are Crimean Tatars. However, in the Crimea’s largest city of Sevastopol, which is considered a separate region of Crimea, there are almost no Crimean Tatars and around 22 percent of Ukrainians, with over 70 percent of the population being Russians.

    An absolute majority of the Crimean population (97 percent) use Russian as their main language, according to Kyiv International Institute of Sociology poll. One of the first decisions of the interim Kiev government directly hit Crimea, as it revoked a law that allowed Russian and other minority languages to be recognized as official in multi-cultural regions.

    What's happening now?
    After the Ukrainian President was ousted and an interim government was established in Kiev, the Russian majority started protesting outside the regional parliament, urging local MPs not to support it. They want the Autonomous Region to return to the constitution of 1992, under which Crimea briefly had its own president and independent foreign policy.

    The parliament of the Crimea autonomous region was due to declare on Wednesday the region’s official position toward the new authorities in Kiev. The Tatar community has spoken out sharply against holding a parliamentary session on the issue, expressing their support for the new central authorities.

    Two separate rallies, consisting of several thousand protesters, faced each other in front of the parliament building in the Crimea capital Simferopol. Two people have died as a result of scuffles and stampede and about 30 were injured, before the head of the Mejlis of the Crimean Tatars, Refat Chubarov, called for the participants of the rally to go home peacefully.

    Following the example of Kiev, vigilante groups are being formed, with about 3,500 people already patrolling the streets of Crimea along with police to prevent any provocations.

    After the central government in Kiev disbanded the Berkut special police task force, new authorities in Sevastopol have refused to comply and welcomed all Berkut officers who feel intimidated to come to live in Crimea with their families. Sevastopol earlier elected a new mayor after the popular gathering ousted the Yanukovich local government, which tried to cling to power by pledging allegiance to Kiev’s new rulers.

    What happens next?
    The ultimate goal of the ethnic Russian population protesting in Crimea is to hold a referendum on whether the region should retain its current status as an autonomous region in Ukraine, to become independent, or become part of Russia again. In the meantime they claim to have a right to disobey orders of the “illegal” central government.

    The Tatar minority meanwhile feels that ethnic Russians are trying to “tear Crimea away from Ukraine” excluding them from deciding the land’s fate.

    Right-wing radicals from Western Ukraine earlier threatened to send the so-called “trains of friendship” full of armed fighters in order to crush any signs of resistance to the revolution they were fighting so hard for.

    The Kiev authorities busy with appointing roles in the revolutionary government in the meantime embraced a soft approach towards Crimea. The interim interior minister even did not undertake any “drastic measures” to arrest fugitive ousted president Yanukovich, fearing that may spark unrest.

    Russia repeatedly confirmed it does not doubt Crimea is a part of Ukraine, even though it understands the emotions of the residents of the region. This week Russian MPs initiated a bill that will allow Russian citizenship within six month if the applicant successfully proves his or her Russian ethnicity. It is prepared especially to save Russian speaking Ukrainians from possible infringement of their rights.

    http://rt.com/news/crimea-facts-protests-politics-945/

  7. #7
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    Russia and Nato to face off over Ukraine
    Russia has ordered units in its western borderlands to begin a snap combat drills in reaction to the fall of former Ukrainian president Viktor Yanukovych


    Tensions on the Crimean peninsular soared have after Vladimir Putin put the Russian army on high alert and Nato officials warned they would back the “inviolability of [Ukraine’s] frontiers”.
    The flurry of sabre rattling over the future of post-revolutionary Ukraine brought tensions between Russia and the West to a height not seen since the 2008 war between Russian and Georgia.
    It came as there were unconfirmed reports that Viktor Yanukovych, the former president ousted from power by protesters last weekend who is now wanted by Ukraine’s authorities for mass murder, had taken refuge at a luxury sanatorium just outside Moscow.
    Russia’s defence minister, Sergei Shoigu, ordered units in Russia’s Western military district - which borders Ukraine - to begin a series of snap combat readiness drills, beginning on Wednesday afternoon.
    The drill would “check the troops’ readiness for action in crisis situations that threaten the nation’s military security”, he said in a statement. It would involve around 150,000 army, air force and navy personnel.



    Moscow also said it was “carefully watching what is happening in Crimea”, taking measures to ensure the security of the facilities and arsenals of its Black Sea naval fleet, based in the city of Sebastopol.
    John Kerry, the US secretary of state, quickly responded by warning Russia “to be very careful in the judgements that it makes”, adding: “We are not looking for confrontation. But we are making it clear that every country should respect the territorial integrity here, the sovereignty of Ukraine.
    “Russia has said it would do that and we think it’s important that Russia keeps its word.”
    Later he added it would be a “grave mistake” for Russia to intervene militarily in Ukraine.
    “For a country that has spoken out so frequently ... against foreign intervention in Libya, in Syria, and elsewhere, it would be important for them to heed those warnings as they think about options in the sovereign nation of Ukraine,” he said.
    “I don’t think there should be any doubt whatsoever that any kind of military intervention that would violate the sovereign territorial integrity of Ukraine would be a huge - a grave mistake,” he added.
    “If there were any kind of decision like that, I do not think that’s a cheap decision. I think it’s a very expensive decision.”
    Mr Kerry also held out the possibility of providing $1 billion in US loan guarantees for Ukraine, as well as US budget support for the former Soviet republic but said no decisions had been made.
    Meanwhile Nato defence ministers warned that they considered Ukraine’s future to be “key to Euro-Atlantic security” and assured the new government in Kiev that the alliance would back its “sovereignty, independence [and] territorial integrity.”
    “A sovereign, independent and stable Ukraine, firmly committed to democracy and the rule of law, is key to Euro-Atlantic security,” they said in a statement.



    more about what led to WW3........................

  8. #8
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    it's going to end in tears and the plan is to save Putin face by abandoning Ukraine plan to be more open to EU

    it's already in the work,

    except the Americans are putting their nose into it and try to derail all this into a civil war

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    Ousted Ukrainian Leader Asks Russia to Protect Him

    MOSCOW — Viktor F. Yanukovych, the ousted president of Ukraine, declared on Thursday that he remained the lawful president of the country and appealed to Russia to “secure my personal safety from the actions of extremists.” Russian news agencies reported that he had already arrived in Russia, but officials did not immediately confirm that.

    Mr. Yanukovych’s remarks were his first since he appeared a video on Saturday night after fleeing Ukraine’s capital, Kiev, for eastern Ukraine. His defiance of the country’s new interim leaders only deepened the political turmoil in the country and threatened to draw Russia more deeply into the conflict.

    Mr. Yanukovych, in a written letter published by news agencies here, went on to suggest that largely Russian regions of Ukraine – including the east and Crimea – did not accept “the anarchy and outright lawlessness” that had gripped the country and said that orders by the new authorities to use the armed forces to impose order were unlawful. He clearly meant the response to pro-Russia demonstrations in Crimea, which took an ugly turn on Thursday morning when armed gunmen seized control of the regional Parliament in Simferopol.

    “I, as the actual president, have not allowed the armed forces of Ukraine to interfere in the ongoing internal political events,” he said, contradicting early reports that he had ordered the military to intervene in Kiev, only to have his order rebuffed. “I continue to order this. In the case that anyone begins to give a similar order to the armed forces and power structures, those orders will be unlawful and criminal.”

    Rumors that Mr. Yanukovych had arrived in Russia first surfaced on Wednesday night, with unnamed sources variously putting him at a hotel in Moscow — which denied it on Thursday — or in a government sanatorium outside the city. The Kremlin spokesman, Dmitri S. Peskov, said in a brief telephone interview that he was not able to speak on the matter now. On Wednesday night, he said he did not know if Mr. Yanukovych had arrived, but a senior member of the upper house of Parliament said he knew for a fact that it was not true.

    Russia has denounced the political upheaval in Kiev and refused to recognize the interim government. At the same time, officials have expressed deep frustration with and at times ridicule of Mr. Yanukovych’s handling of the crisis. Russia’s foreign minister, Sergey V. Lavrov, has repeatedly insisted that Ukraine’s leaders were bound by an agreement mediated by three European foreign ministers remained in force. That agreement, signed last Friday, called for an interim national unity government and new elections, but not until December.

    More about the origins of WW3...........

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    The Ukraine has a very decent army.


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    The head of the center-left Fair Russia party says a bill allowing any Ukrainian citizen Russian citizenship will be submitted to the Lower House in the near future.

    “A few days back the LDPR party submitted a bill allowing for a simplified citizenship procedure for Ukrainian citizens of Russian descent. We are lodging an initiative that would allow any Ukrainian who wishes to receive Russian citizenship to do so under a simplified procedure,” the RIA Novosti news agency quoted Sergey Mironov as saying at a party conference in Moscow.

    The politician also suggested that Russian law enforcement consider giving jobs to former members of Ukrainian Berkut police unit, with possible further citizenship for them. “If any of them find it attractive to work in Russia we should give him a place in our police and other law enforcement structures in accordance with his rank and qualifications,” Mironov stated.

    “We should not forget for a single minute that there are 7 million Russians in Ukraine according to the official census. I am sure the Russian Federation must not forget that we are responsible for our compatriots, we cannot allow anyone to sneer at our holy sites and threaten the lives of Russian citizens and ethnic Russians who live in Ukraine,” the politician said.

    The LDPR bill Mironov referred to was submitted on Monday by MP Ilya Drozdov. The draft prepared by nationalists allows Russian citizenship within six month for applicants who successfully prove their Russian ethnicity (which is determined as having at least one direct ancestor who had Russian citizenship by birth).

    When Drozdov presented the motion he emphasized that it came about because of the current political situation in Ukraine.

    Last Sunday the Ukrainian parliament voted to repeal the 2012 law “On State Language Policy” and returned Ukrainian as the only official language in the country. Previously, Ukrainian regions could introduce additional official languages spoken by large groups of the population and the Russian speaking East chose Russian. In addition, one of the leaders of the "Maidan" movement, the head of the Freedom Party Oleg Tyagnibok said in the parliament that the use of the Russian language should be criminalized, and all ethnic Russians should be stripped of citizenship and live under the non-citizen status.

    The news caused a surge of outrage in East Ukrainian cities and direct calls for succession in the Autonomous Republic of Crimea with eventual clashes between ethnic Russians and supporters of the "Maidan" movement near the office of the regional legislature. Mironov paid a brief visit to Sevastopol in Crimea this week, and there he also promised that his party would try to fast track citizenship for ethnic Russians.

    However, one of Russia’s top politicians – the chair of the Federation Council Valentina Matvienko said in a television interview on Tuesday that Russia did not doubt that Crimea was part of Ukraine and that the authorities did not support any provocative actions. At the same time she said that “certain moods” on the peninsula had emerged after no one asked its residents’ opinion about the decisions being taken in Kiev. http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/28/wo...aine.html?_r=0

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    Quote Originally Posted by Necron99
    Russia and US to face off over Ukraine
    Fixed that for you mate.
    Quote Originally Posted by Butterfly
    the Americans are putting their nose into it and try to derail all this into a civil war
    That would be really out of character of them

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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Takeovers View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Bettyboo View Post
    That's gonna go down well with the Ukrainians...
    They are Ukranians.

    It seems they don't see it that way. Raising the russian flag and all.
    That's because they support Russia, no big surprise is it?

    But they're not looking at emigrating are they?
    Likely they want to emigrate. It's just that they want to take Crimea with them.
    "don't attribute to malice what can be adequately explained by incompetence"

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    Hey a bit of Cyprus-style annexation, just what we need.

    Or perhaps the creation of yet another state and a bit of forced relocation, Kosovo style.

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    Maybe the Crimea should go to Russia, and the rest of the Ukraine go it's own way.

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    I hope Great Britain does not get involved again in another Crimea war, we don't need a second Florence Nightingale,the Lady with the lamp.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bettyboo
    The Ukraine has a very decent army.
    The guy on the ground with the camera...What's he shooting at?...

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    Marching with high heels.

    Ukraine girls really knock me out,,, they leave the west behind .....

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    Quote Originally Posted by BaitongBoy View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Bettyboo
    The Ukraine has a very decent army.
    The guy on the ground with the camera...What's he shooting at?...
    I think he's looking for a bit of sneaky upskirt but he's not very subtle.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BaitongBoy
    What's he shooting at?...
    The fine aroma of fresh lobster Nuremburg.

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    The News is reporting about an agreement in a treaty that the U.K would support Ukraine in the event of war,signed in 1990's.
    Thats just what we need, these treaties that Britain must honor,same as the treaty they had with Poland before WW2

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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Bettyboo View Post
    That's gonna go down well with the Ukrainians...
    They are Ukranians.
    They could be Russians.

    Stalin (I believe it was Stalin) transplanted Russians to the Crimea in an ethnic shift to get more Russians on the peninsula.

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    Ukraine accuses Russia of ‘armed invasion’ of Crimea, Viktor Yanukovych emerges from

    US President Barack Obama says he is deeply concerned about reports of Russian military activity in Ukraine and warns there would be costs to any infringement of its sovereignty.

    “The United States will stand with the international community in affirming that there will be costs for any military intervention in Ukraine,’’ Mr Obama told reporters at the White House.

    ”We are now deeply concerned by reports of military movements taken by the Russian Federation inside of Ukraine.’’

    Obama recognised that Russia had interests and cultural and economic ties with Ukraine, after the exit of the pro-Moscow government in Kiev, and also had a military facility in Crimea.

    But he said any violation of Ukraine’s sovereignty and territorial integrity would be “deeply destabilising’’.

    The president did not say whether the United States had intelligence as to whether reports quoting a Ukrainian official that 2000 Russian troops had landed in the Crimea were correct.

    But he warned a Russian military intervention in the post-Soviet state would “represent a profound interference in matters that must be determined by the Ukrainian people’’.
    Ukrainian authorities say they have regained control of two Crimean airports seized during an “armed invasion” by Russian forces that prompted the country’s new pro-EU leaders to appeal for protection from the West.

    The spiralling tensions in a nation torn between the West and Russia took another dramatic turn on Friday, when ousted president Viktor Yanukovych emerged from hiding to insist he had not been overthrown and would continue to fight for the future of Ukraine.

    Mr Yanukovych told reporters in the southern Russian city of Rostov-on-Don in his first public appearance for almost a week that he had been “compelled to leave” Ukraine after he received threats to his security.

    “I have not been overthrown by anyone, I was compelled to leave Ukraine due to an immediate threat to my life and the life of those close to me,” he said, sitting at a desk alongside a senior editor from the ITAR-TASS news agency in front of three Ukrainian flags.

    “I intend to continue the fight for the future of Ukraine against those who try to saddle it with fear and terror.”

    Mr Yanukovych, who fled after being impeached by parliament on Saturday, savaged the anti-Kremlin and pro-EU forces who have now taken power.

    “Power in Ukraine has been taken by nationalist, pro-fascist young people who represent the absolute minority of people in Ukraine.”

    “This is anarchy, terror and chaos,” he added.

    His comments came as Swiss authorities ordered a freeze on his assets and those of his multi-millionaire son and launched a criminal probe into alleged money-laundering by the pair.

    Mr Yanukovych and his coal magnate son Oleksandr are on a list of 20 Ukrainian officials including former ministers being targeted by the authorities in Switzerland.

    Liechtenstein followed suit on Friday and also froze the bank accounts of the same officials.

    Austria announced it also had moved against 18 Ukrainian officials suspected of violating human rights and involvement in corruption.

    Austrian media reported the group included former ministers but said it was not known if Mr Yanukovych or his family had any funds in the country.

    Meanwhile, the head of Ukraine’s security and defence council said Russian soldiers and local pro-Kremlin militia were responsible for the dawn raids on Crimea’s main airport and another base on the southwest of the peninsula where pro-Moscow sentiment runs high.

    A spokesman for Russia’s Crimea-based Black Sea Fleet denied any involvement in the airport occupations. But Ukraine’s parliament immediately appealed to the US and Britain to uphold a 1994 pact with Russia that guaranteed the country’s sovereignty in return for it giving up its Soviet nuclear arms.

    Both MPs and UN Security Council chair Lithuania said they would also ask the world body to address the Crimea crisis at its next session — a request that would need to gain support from veto-wielding members such as Russia.


    more....

  24. #24
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    First they take control of the airports and now reports of Russian planes flying in a few thousand troops.

    Not sounding good.

  25. #25
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    Butterfly's Avatar
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    Go Putin, go

    EU really fucked up on that one, and will have to come to the rescue of Putin to calm down Kiev and their unrealistic plan to join the EU and NATO

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