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  1. #1
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    99pc of NSA leaks not published

    Last updated 07:05 04/12/2013

    The editor of the Guardian said today that his newspaper has published just 1 per cent of the material it received from former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden, and denied that the paper had placed lives or national security at risk.

    Alan Rusbridger was questioned by Parliament's home affairs committee as part of a session on counterterrorism.

    The Guardian has published a series of stories based on leaks from Snowden disclosing the scale of telephone and Internet surveillance by spy agencies in the United States and Britain.

    Rusbridger said the leak amounted to about 58,000 files and the newspaper had published "about 1 percent" of the total.

    "I would not expect us to be publishing a huge amount more," he said.

    Government and intelligence officials have said the leaks compromised British security and aided terrorists. Britain's top three spy chiefs said last month that al Qaeda and other terror groups were "rubbing their hands in glee" in the wake of Snowden's leaks.

    Several lawmakers have said the Guardian should be prosecuted for breaching terrorism laws.

    Rusbridger defended the newspaper's role, saying stories published by the Guardian and others had prompted debate about the extent of intelligence activities and exposed the limits of regulatory laws drawn up in the pre-Internet era.

    "There is no doubt in my mind ... that newspapers have done something that oversight has failed to do," he said.


    Rusbridger denied placing intelligence agents at risk,
    saying the Guardian had "made very selective judgments" about what to publish and not revealed any names.

    "We have published no names and we have lost control of no names," he said.

    British police launched a criminal investigation into the leaks after detaining the partner of then-Guardian journalist Glenn Greenwald at Heathrow Airport in August under terrorism legislation.

    Police have refused to disclose who is under investigation and for what alleged offences. Rusbridger said he did not know whether the Guardian was being investigated.

    He said the Guardian had come under pressure from the authorities in a way that would be "inconceivable" in the United States, where journalists can rely on First Amendment protections of freedom of speech.

    Rusbridger cited visits to the newspaper from Britain's top civil servant, who demanded an end to the stories, and politicians' calls for the newspaper to be prosecuted.

    "I feel that some of this activity has been designed to intimidate the Guardian," Rusbridger said.

    That sentiment was echoed in a letter to the parliamentary panel from the US-based Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press, which said that "to the rest of the world, it appears that press freedom itself is under attack in Britain."

    The letter was signed by US media organisations including The New York Times, The Washington Post and The Associated Press. It said it was "unwise and counterproductive to react to the reporting on disclosures from Edward Snowden by reflexively invoking security concerns to silence the press or to accuse a news organisation of aiding terrorists simply by providing citizens with information they need to know."
    Edward Snowden | 99 Per Cent Of NSA Leaks Not Published... | Stuff.co.nz

  2. #2
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    Alan Rusbridger said that The Guardian "will not be intimidated". He spoke the truth, I suppose. It already has been.

  3. #3
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    I suspect all of his staff made some comment about wanting to pass through airports freely when they go on their Xmas holidays.


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    Thailand Expat raycarey's Avatar
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    i would guess that somewhere near 99% of what the NSA has intercepted isn't salacious enough for the average citizen to warrant publication

    btw, there's been a lot of recent hand wringing out this story.

    what did people assume the NSA was doing?

    i'm not saying that i approve of it, because i don't....but for christ's sake, this is what NSA does...and it's not like they just started doing it yesterday.

    if you want to abolish the NSA, i'm all for it....but you can't fund and staff a super secret spy agency and then get your panties in a twist because they're spying.

  5. #5
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    Yes, but they're supposed to be spying on the enemy, not their own people. Unless of course....

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda
    Yes, but they're supposed to be spying on the enemy, not their own people. Unless of course....
    ...we are the enemy?

  7. #7
    Thailand Expat raycarey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda
    Yes, but they're supposed to be spying on the enemy, not their own people.
    i have no idea what's in the NSA's charter (i would guess that not many people do) but whatever is in there, i'm sure it's ambiguous enough to allow spying on US citizens.

  8. #8
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    The NSA is an American government agency dealing in security matters, and as such falls within the auspices of the CiC who is at liberty point it at his perceived enemy.

    You never know, Obama might get it in his head that NASA, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, is better suited to Muslim outreach.

    <gulp> I must be a racist!

  9. #9
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    According to MI5 whistleblower Annie Machon, The Brits are not allowed to spy on Brits and the Yanks aren't supposed to spy on their own. So they knowingly spy on each other and swap info thereby using a loophole.

  10. #10
    Thailand Expat raycarey's Avatar
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    my understanding is that the CIA isn't permitted to do domestic surveillance, but i don't know if the NSA has the same constraints

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    This whole Snowden thing is just a smoke screen for the really scary shit the NSA is up to.

    The people are mad but not so mad that they vote to shut the NSA down.

    The NSA got exactly what it wanted by letting this one low level nutjob walk out of the supposedly tightest security agency in the world with some lame ass power point presentations that a 5th grader could slap together in 5 minutes.

    Why can't people see a false flag operation when it's right in their faces? Everybody knew they were doing this for years now.

    Just imagine what they are really hiding!
    I'm not saying it was Aliens, but it was Aliens!

  12. #12
    ENT
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    Spot on.......

  13. #13
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    Years ago the NSA was my first step at obtaining a Security clearance. 2nd step was an FBI check. Third step was a CIA background check.

    I was cleared by all three according to my employment in a special project for the government at that time.

    I must have filled out history data on my life from birth to the present day of application. List of relatives, friends and addresses of previous residences, schools, military career, police reports and general questions regarding my feelings/opinions on political subjects. Numerous interviews of friends and associates as well as family members followed.

    I can only imagine what NSA picks up from casual telephone conversations or e-mails?

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