Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 29

Thread: Silk Road

  1. #1
    Mid
    Mid is offline
    Thailand Expat
    Mid's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    1,413

    Silk Road

    Teens visit hidden website for drugs
    Amy Corderoy
    March 20, 2013

    Teenagers as young as 16 are using the underground drug sales website Silk Road, the Fairfax Media Global Drug Survey reveals.

    The survey, which was the first to interview Australian users of Silk Road, found their ages varied from 16 to 89 and most were using it to buy more ''traditional'' drugs such as ecstasy and cannabis.

    About 6.5 per cent of users were age 16 and 17, which was the youngest age allowed to participate in the survey, said Monica Barratt, a research fellow at the National Drug Research Institute who analysed the results.

    Dr Barratt said she was surprised that the majority of people were avoiding the proliferation of new and untested drugs available.

    The most common drug people said they had bought was MDMA (ecstasy), followed by cannabis, LSD and cocaine.

    ''We are not seeing a lot of people who are choosing really weird drugs,'' Dr Barratt said.

    ''They are choosing the drugs they know.''

    Dr Barratt will present the findings at the Australasian Drug and Alcohol Strategy Conference in Sydney on Wednesday.

    She said the survey raised the question of whether people were choosing to buy so-called ''legal highs'' - newly invented drug compounds that are often sold in adult stores and tobacconists - because other drugs were illegal.

    ''Maybe we can see the Silk Road as a kind of microcosm of what might happen if we lived in a world where all drugs were regulated,'' she said.

    Of the more than 2500 people who said they usually bought their own drugs, more than half had heard of Silk Road, the majority learning about it from media reports. However, even though many had looked at the site, only 184 had bought drugs.

    Dr Barratt said Silk Road, which operates through the so-called ''dark internet'' and uses an alternative currency, may not be that easy for people to use.

    More than 6600 Australians responded to the Global Drug Survey, making it the largest, most up-to-date survey of current drug users conducted in Australia. Its results are not representative of the broader population, as participants were more likely to be male, older and well off.

    Nearly two-thirds of people who had heard of Silk Road but chose not to buy drugs there said they already had adequate access to illicit drugs and about half said that they were worried about police or customs.

    Dr Barratt said dealers tended to promise the drugs would not be detectable because they are vacuum packed and sealed in ''stealth packaging'' but, anecdotally, it appears Australians have more trouble importing drugs than people in Britain and Europe, where borders are more porous.

    About a quarter said they were concerned about being ripped off.

    smh.com.au

  2. #2
    Mid
    Mid is offline
    Thailand Expat
    Mid's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    1,413
    Police follow the Silk Road to online drug marketplace
    Asher Moses
    August 11, 2012

    A highly successful website that sells illegal drugs is challenging Australian police efforts to rein in its activities.


    Silk Road is the Amazon of the drug trade.


    POLICE and customs officials are turning their attention to the online marketplace of illegal drugs, Silk Road, which is achieving an estimated $22 million a year in sales.

    Silk Road - started by ''Dread Pirate Roberts'' in February last year - functions like a black market version of eBay, complete with vendor feedback, dispute resolution and sales promotions. Cocaine and ecstasy sell for a quarter of street prices in Australia while drugs such as cannabis and prescription medication are shipped worldwide.


    Those who buy from Silk Road run the risk of Customs intercepting their package but many are happy to take that chance.


    The Australian Federal Police recently arrested a Melbourne man for allegedly importing drugs into Australia via Silk Road, which operates in the so-called ''dark net'' or ''hidden web''. He was charged with 10 offences relating to the importation, trafficking and possession of narcotics and prohibited weapons, and is due to appear in Melbourne Magistrates Court on October 24.

    In May, the federal police and Customs seized 120 kilograms of illicit substances imported via the postal system. They arrested 37 people.

    The federal police are so concerned about the number of Australians using the site that they and Customs recently warned Silk Road users ''their identity will not always remain anonymous and when caught, they will be prosecuted''.

    In
    June this year Customs foiled an attempt to smuggle nine packages of drugs into Australia within DVD cases.


    But Nigel Phair, a former policeman turned computer security consultant who has just secured funding from the National Drug Law Enforcement Research Fund to look into the online drugs trade, says police need to make huge changes if they are to make a dent in the problem.

    The Carnegie Mellon University's computer security professor, Nicolas Christin, spent more than six months on daily analysis of Silk Road for a research paper. He found use of the site had been growing and total revenue for its more than 500 sellers was about $US1.9 million ($1.8 million) a month - and $US143,000 a month went to the site's operators as commission.

    Christin estimates Silk Road has up to 150,000 customers who bought 24,422 items from February 3 and July 24 this year. Cannabis is the most popular item.

    Despite the anonymity of the service and the lack of legal recourse if you get ripped off, Christin found that for 96.5 per cent of items buyers gave a 5 out of 5 feedback rating.

    The site seems to be increasingly popular with Australians, according to Monica Barratt, a research fellow at the National Drug Research Institute, who says it highlights the futility of law enforcement.

    ''Drug use and the demand for drug use isn't changing, so if for some reason Silk Road is suppressed or removed, there will just be another supply channel pop up,'' she says.

    Users can access the service only using TOR software, which purports masks the user's location and details. Payment is made using the encrypted but volatile digital currency Bitcoin.

    Phair says: ''There is a perception among many law enforcement and regulatory agencies that it is all too hard to conduct investigations involving TOR, so never start. There needs to be much more training of general investigators in conducting technical lines of inquiry, including the purchase of forensic discovery equipment if we are going to make a dent in this problem.''

    But because drugs are delivered by post, anyone who uses Silk Road runs the risk of their parcel being intercepted.

    It is not clear how many of the billions of parcels Australia Post handles are scanned and Christin found most sellers used techniques to make package inspection unlikely, such as vacuum sealing or ''professional looking'' envelopes with typed addresses.

    It is not an offence to access the Silk Road but the federal police say anyone who imports border-controlled drugs faces a maximum penalty of life imprisonment and/or a $825,000 fine.

    The acting manager in the customs cargo and maritime targeting branch, Alana Sullivan, says Customs monitors illicit e-commerce platforms including Silk Road and is aware that Australian sellers and buyers use it.

    It is understood authorities have difficulty identifying the websites linked to seizures because intercepted parcels often do not have identifying features. Police rely on finding documentary or forensic evidence to link a seizure to a site, or an admission by the offender. The federal police do not have jurisdiction to investigate websites based overseas. They can refer matters to overseas counterparts but cannot compel them to act.

    smh.com.au
    Last edited by Mid; 01-04-2013 at 11:04 AM. Reason: formatting

  3. #3
    Thailand Expat
    alwarner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Last Online
    21-09-2018 @ 03:15 PM
    Location
    Location: Location.
    Posts
    5,126
    That picture can't be real can it?

    1/2g of Cocaine for $5.44?

    10g of weed for about the same price?

    Fake photo's aside, I've read a bit about the Silk Road and it just confirms that a lot of people using it are a bit dim.

    A guy from Australia imported some ecstasy from Holland and got caught. You can imagine how much severe the charges were for importing rather than just buying locally. Kids in the USA buying things from different states making their charges federal etc...
    <Your advert for prostitutes here, reasonable rates>

  4. #4
    Mid
    Mid is offline
    Thailand Expat
    Mid's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    1,413
    not dollars bit coins ...................

  5. #5
    Thailand Expat
    alwarner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Last Online
    21-09-2018 @ 03:15 PM
    Location
    Location: Location.
    Posts
    5,126
    Ahh of course. That would make perfect sense. The B looked like a $ on my screen.

    As you were.


  6. #6
    Neo
    Neo is offline
    Dislocated Member
    Neo's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 02:42 AM
    Location
    Nebuchadnezzar
    Posts
    10,577

    Police crack down on Silk Road following first drug dealer conviction

    By Olivia Solon
    01 February 13



    An Australian drug dealer has become the first person to be convicted of a Silk Road-related crime, after using the black marketplace to buy a stash of MDMA, amphetamine, marijuana and cocaine.
    People can buy goods from Silk Road only by connecting with the anonymising Tor network and using Bitcoins.

    The marketplace has very few restrictions on what people can sell, but is largely used for trading drugs. An August 2012 study by security researchers at Carnegie Mellon University revealed that the Silk Road trades items worth 1.22 million every month.

    According to a report in The Age Paul Leslie Howard used Silk Road to buy and import the illicit drugs on 11 different occasions. Australian Customs and Border Protection Service officers in Melbourne and Sydney examined mail -- most of which came from the Netherlands and Germany -- destined for his home. They found 46.9 grammes of MDMA and 14.5 grammes of cocaine. The federal police then raided his house in July 2012 and found digital scales, ziplock bags, $2,300 (2,000) in cash, 35 stun guns disguised as mobile phones and a money counter. They also found two working mobile phones, and forensically analysed more than 20,000 text messages. In amongst them were incriminating texts such as "I got five grand worth if you want" and "promote the LSD I got more in. I sold 200 cubes last week".

    Howard has pleaded guilty to two charges of "importing a marketable quantity of a border-controlled drug", which carries a maximum jail term of 25 years. He also pleaded guilty to possessing controlled weapons.

    During the trial he said that he had been drawn to the site after reading an article by a journalist called Eileen Ormsby, who regularly covers the Silk Road in Australian newspapers. Since Howard's conviction, the Silk Road has warned its users via its Twitter account not to follow their feed nor the feed of Ormsby with their real names.

    Prosecutor Morgan Brown made it clear that the authorities had a lot of information about Howard from the Silk Road, including access to his profile, which he registered under the name Shadh1 in April 2012. He set up a vendor's account offering up cocaine and speed and saying that he is looking to "branch into more as I get more coin back in my pocket".

    At the time of Howard's arrest, the Australian Federal Police and the Customs and Border Protection Service issued a warning to any would-be drug traders using supposedly anonymous marketplaces such as the Silk Road saying they could be identified by police techniques.

    AFP manager of crime operations Peter Sykora said in a statement: "Criminals are attempting to exploit the international mail system through online networks, but the recent arrest demonstrates that we are one step ahead of them. The AFP will continue to identify, investigate and prosecute individuals or groups importing narcotics into Australia, including via illicit ecommerce platforms such as Silk Road."

    Australian police aren't the only ones to crack down on the Silk Road. The DEA in the United States is also on the warpath, targeting similar sites such as the Farmer's Market. In July 2012 the organisation told a US news station KXAN that it was investigating the Silk Road and in November 2012, DEA spokesperson Rusty Payne told The Verge when quizzed on the Silk Road: "Typically we're not really giving out investigative updates about what we're doing, but it's safe to say we are heavily involved in looking into that." In the UK, the Serious Organised Crime Agency and the Metropolitan Police E-Crime unit have also been digging into the marketplace.

    However, despite all of these investigations, the conviction rate isn't looking all that promising for law enforcement.


    Police crack down on Silk Road following first drug dealer conviction (Wired UK)
    Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside in a cloud of smoke, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming "Wow! What a Ride!"

  7. #7
    Thailand Expat
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    60,017
    Never heard of it, have now.

    However, nor will I use it. But I bet millions that hadn't heard of it have now, well done Herald Sun. And even better work by describing how you need to use TOR to access it.

  8. #8
    Lord of Swine
    Necron99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Nahkon Sawon
    Posts
    13,025

    Silk Road But Causes Bitcoin Plunge

    The eBay of the black market has met its demise. The US Justice Department has shuttered Silk Road and indicted its alleged founder.

    An online marketplace founded in 2011, Silk Road facilitated commerce in illegal goods and services, including drugs, counterfeit currency and hacking services, with payments processed in the digital currency Bitcoin. Perhaps not coincidentally, the price of Bitcoin fell to about $US119 on Thursday, down from $US145 at the end of September.

    About 600,000 Bitcoins worth about $US1.2 billion have been exchanged on Silk Road, which prosecutors called "the most sophisticated and extensive criminal marketplace on the internet." The FBI seized 26,000 Bitcoins worth about $US3.6 million from the Silk Road in what prosecutors called the largest Bitcoin haul in history.

    Advertisement
    Ross William Ulbricht, 29, known on Silk Road as "Dread Pirate Roberts", was arrested in San Francisco and charged with narcotics-trafficking conspiracy, computer-hacking conspiracy and money-laundering conspiracy. Ulbricht calls himself an "investment adviser and entrepreneur" on his Linkedin profile, but prosecutors said his activities included making a death threat against a Silk Road user who had threatened to reveal information about the site.

    While the FBI celebrated, Silk Road travellers took to Reddit where they are freaking out about lost money, unconsummated drug deals and the declining value of Bitcoin.

    What will Silk Road's end mean for the popular crypto-currency? Before Bitcoin was sufficiently mainstream to constitute non-profit donations or warrant its own exchange-traded fund, it was best known for its utility (and ubiquity) on Silk Road. Bitcoin's association with illicit trade was once central to its identity and is still an impetus to government scrutiny.

    But Bitcoin no longer needs Silk Road. For one thing, there are other online marketplaces where Bitcoin could be used illegally. Perhaps more importantly, in the three months ending in June, Bitcoin start-ups raised almost $US12 million from venture capital investors. Bitcoin may still be high-risk, but a customer base of legitimate start-ups and fewer drug lords probably bodes well.



    Read more: Will Silk Road bust kill Bitcoin?

  9. #9
    Lord of Swine
    Necron99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Nahkon Sawon
    Posts
    13,025
    ^ Silk Road Bust if Mod could edit.

  10. #10
    disturbance in the Turnip baldrick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Last Online
    Today @ 06:35 PM
    Location
    Heidleberg
    Posts
    21,606
    running silk road while living in the USA was a rather stupid maneuver.

  11. #11
    Lord of Swine
    Necron99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Nahkon Sawon
    Posts
    13,025
    Not a criminal mastermind was he?
    He got caught because he used his real name on stackoverflow and gave someone advice as to how to use "His website" SilkRoad.

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Last Online
    25-09-2014 @ 01:00 PM
    Posts
    97
    Quote :
    Bitcoin may still be high-risk, but a customer base of legitimate start-ups and fewer drug lords probably bodes well.

    Sorry no 'still' about it, it is high risk period

  13. #13
    Mid
    Mid is offline
    Thailand Expat
    Mid's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    1,413
    Silk Road: How FBI closed in on suspect Ross Ulbricht
    Dave Lee
    2 October 2013


    A lengthy investigation into internet communications led the FBI to their suspect


    US authorities believe that 29-year-old Ross William Ulbricht, arrested on Wednesday, is Dread Pirate Roberts (DPR) - the administrator of the notorious Silk Road online marketplace.

    It was an underground website where people from all over the world were able to buy drugs.

    In the months leading up to Mr Ulbricht's arrest, investigators undertook a painstaking process of piecing together the suspect's digital footprint, going back years into his history of communicating with others online.

    The detail of how the FBI has built its case was outlined in a court complaint document published on Wednesday.

    The search started with work from Agent-1, the codename given to the expert cited in the court documents, who undertook an "extensive search of the internet" that sifted through pages dating back to January 2011.

    The trail began with a post made on a web forum where users discussed the use of magic mushrooms.

    In a post titled "Anonymous market online?", a user nicknamed Altoid started publicising the site.
    What was the Silk Road?

    Silk Road took its name from the historic trade routes spanning Europe, Asia and parts of Africa.

    News reports and other internet chatter helped it become notorious. However, most users would not have been able to stumble upon the site as the service could only be accessed through a service called Tor - a facility that routes traffic through many separate encrypted layers of the net to hide data identifiers.

    Tor was invented by the US Naval Research Laboratory and has subsequently been used by journalists and free speech campaigners, among others, to safeguard people's anonymity.

    But it has also been used as a means to hide illegal activities, leading it to be dubbed "the dark web".

    Payments for goods on Silk Road were made with the virtual currency Bitcoin, which can be hard to monitor.

    Court documents from the FBI said the site had just under a million registered users, but investigators said they did not know how many were active.

    Earlier this year Carnegie Mellon University estimated that over $1.22m (786,000) worth of trading took place on the Silk Road every month.
    "I came across this website called Silk Road," Altoid wrote. "Let me know what you think."

    The post contained a link to a site hosted by the popular blogging platform Wordpress. This provided another link to the Silk Road's location on the so-called "dark web".

    Records obtained by Agent-1 from Wordpress discovered, unsurprisingly, that the blog had been set up by an anonymous user who had hidden their location.

    But then Altoid appeared in another place: a discussion site about virtual currency, bitcointalk.org.

    Altoid - who the FBI claimed is Mr Ulbricht - was using "common online marketing" tactics. In other words, he was trying to make Silk Road go viral.

    Months later, in October, Altoid appeared again - but made a slip-up, granting investigators a major lead.

    In a post asking seeking to find an IT expert with knowledge of Bitcoin, he asked people to contact him via rossulbricht@gmail.com.

    With a Gmail address to hand, Agent-1 linked this address to accounts on the Google+ social network and YouTube video site. There he discovered some of Mr Ulbricht's interests.

    Among them, according to the viewing history, was economics. In particular, Mr Ulbricht's account had "favourited" several clips from the Ludwig von Mises Institute, a renowned Austrian school of economics.

    Years later, on the Silk Road discussion forums, Dread Pirate Roberts would make several references to the Mises Institute and its work.

    Covering tracks

    According to the court complaint document, it was the discovery of the rossulbricht@gmail.com email address that gave investigators a major boost in their search.

    Through records "obtained from Google", details of IP addresses - and therefore locations - used to log into Mr Ulbricht's account focused the search on San Francisco, specifically an internet cafe on Laguna Street.

    Furthermore, detailed analysis of Silk Road's source code highlighted a function that restricted who was able to log in to control the site, locking it down to just one IP address.

    As would be expected, Dread Pirate Roberts was using a VPN - virtual private network - to generate a "false" IP address, designed to cover his tracks.


    Mr Ulbricht said to have been running Silk Road from Hickory Street in San Francisco

    However, the provider of the VPN was subpoenaed by the FBI.

    While efforts had been made by DPR to delete data, the VPN server's records showed a user logged in from an internet cafe just 500 yards from an address on Hickory Street, known to be the home of a close friend of Mr Ulbricht's, and a location that had also been used to log in to the Gmail account.

    At this point in the investigation, these clues, investigators concluded, were enough to suggest that Mr Ulbricht and DPR - if not the same person - were at the very least in the same location at the same time.

    Fake IDs


    The court complaint went into detail about further leads that followed.
    In July of this year, by coincidence, a routine border check of a package from Canada discovered forged documents for several fake identities all containing photographs of the same person.
    How bitcoins work

    Bitcoin is often referred to as a new kind of currency.

    But it may be better to think of its units as being virtual tokens that have value because enough people believe they do and there is a finite number of them.

    Each of the 11 million Bitcoins currently in existence is represented by a unique online registration number.

    These numbers are created through a process called "mining", which involves a computer solving a difficult mathematical problem.

    Each time a problem is solved the computer's owner is rewarded with 25 Bitcoins.

    To receive a Bitcoin, a user must also have a Bitcoin address - a randomly generated string of 27 to 34 letters and numbers - which acts as a kind of virtual postbox to and from which the Bitcoins are sent.

    Since there is no registry of these addresses, people can use them to protect their anonymity when making a transaction.

    These addresses are in turn stored in Bitcoin wallets, which are used to manage savings. They operate like privately run bank accounts - with the proviso that if the data is lost, so are the Bitcoins contained.
    It was headed to San Francisco's 15th Street. Homeland security visited the address, and found the man in the photographs - Mr Ulbricht.

    He told officers that the people he lived with knew him simply as Josh - one housemate described him as being "always home in his room on the computer".

    Around the same time, investigators working on the Silk Road case later discovered, DPR had been communicating with users privately to ask for advice on obtaining fake IDs - needed in order to purchase more servers.

    Further activity attributed to Mr Ulbricht took place on Stack Overflow - a question-and-answer website for programmers - where a user named Frosty asked questions about intricate coding that later became part of the source code of Silk Road.

    In another apparent slip-up, one of Frosty's messages initially identified itself as being written by Ross Ulbricht - before being quickly corrected.

    "I believe that Ulbricht changed his username to 'frosty' in order to conceal his association with the message he had posted one minute before," lead prosecutor Christopher Tarbell wrote in court documents.

    "The posting was accessible to anyone on the internet and implicated him in operating a Tor hidden service."

    bbc.co.uk

  14. #14
    I am in Jail
    Butterfly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Last Online
    01-02-2019 @ 03:12 PM
    Posts
    39,832
    strange, there was an anonymous interview of the guy a few weeks ago by a journalist

    I suspect the journalist got made by the NSA,

    the guy is said to have been paranoid and super cautious, probably another conspiracy theory happening to be true at the end

  15. #15
    Mid
    Mid is offline
    Thailand Expat
    Mid's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    1,413

  16. #16
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Last Online
    11-09-2018 @ 12:58 AM
    Posts
    592
    From USA... 555...

  17. #17
    Thailand Expat
    Albert Shagnastier's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Last Online
    22-03-2015 @ 09:09 PM
    Location
    City of Angels
    Posts
    7,164
    Sounds like a great site.

    Obviously going too head to head with the CIA with their high margins and all

  18. #18
    Mid
    Mid is offline
    Thailand Expat
    Mid's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    1,413
    3 Alleged Silk Road Moderators Arrested in Global Sting
    Fran Berkman
    Dec. 20



    The U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York confirmed the arrest of three alleged moderators of the online black market Silk Road. A representative told Mashable Friday that law enforcement agencies have apprehended Andrew Michael Jones in Virginia, Gary Davis in Ireland and Peter Phillip Nash in Australia.

    U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara unsealed an indictment Friday listing conspiracy charges against the three men related to narcotics trafficking, computer hacking and money laundering. The indictment refers to the three suspects by their actual names and their supposed Silk Road aliases — Jones is thought to have been "Inigo," Davis is thought to have been "Libertas" and Nash is thought to have multiple online aliases, including "Samesamebutdifferent," "Batman 73," Symmetry" and "Anonymousasshit."

    The indictment covers the timeframe from January 2011 until Oct. 2, 2013, which means the crimes only relate to the original Silk Road, which the FBI seized on Oct. 1. A new site made to resemble the original Silk Road launched in November, and several of its moderators went by the same aliases found in the indictment against Jones, Davis and Nash.

    The FBI confirmed on Friday it has made a new arrest related to the recently relaunched online drug marketplace Silk Road, known as Silk Road 2.0. The development comes after a night of intense speculation among the site's community that two of its moderators were apprehended and that law enforcement possibly has deep access to the site.

    A spokesperson for the FBI office in Richmond, Va., told Mashable that agents had executed a search warrant Andrew Michael Jones, who is thought to be a Silk Road moderator with the alias "Inigo." Separately, a spokesperson for the New York FBI office told Mashable that the agency made an arrest related to Silk Road, but would not to provide a name.

    See also: As Major Silk Road Competitor Shutters, $100M Vanishes With It

    Both FBI representatives declined to provide any further information in what is an ongoing investigation.

    Concurrently, TechCrunch confirmed with law enforcement in Ireland that another Silk Road top moderators who goes by "Libertas" was also arrested.

    Speculation about the arrests erupted early Friday morning, after a poster on Reddit claimed her boyfriend, a moderator for Silk Road, was arrested.

    You can read the full post here.


    The original post on Reddit included images of what appears to be a search warrant. The images have since been deleted, but not before DeepDotWeb downloaded them.

    The apparent search warrant was signed by U.S. Magistrate Judge M. Hannah Lauck of the Eastern District of Virginia federal court. The warrant calls for the seizure of "evidence relevant to corroborating the identification of Jones as the Silk Road administrator 'Inigo.'"

    The Redditor also uploaded a scanned business card from FBI agent Christopher Tarbell, who is responsible for the arrest Ross William Ulbricht, the alleged owner and operator of the original Silk Road.

    Concern over the arrests bubbled up even further following a post on another black market website called Tormarket. An individual claiming to have access to a private Silk Road vendor forum posted the following:
    Guys I was arrested yesterday and out on bond now. But something is fucked! I know I'm risking more warning you guys and my attorney doesn't even want me on the internet but you guys need to know this. When I was in the interview room they showed me all sorts of shit that they should not know or have access to including conversations I've had with buyers and even DPR. I don't fucking understand.. and when I was in there I was at a loss for words. Something is definitely wrong and they have the ability to see things on here only mods or admins should like btc transfers and a dispute I had. WHAT THE FUCK?
    If the above post is indeed legitimate, more arrests could be imminent. At publishing time, the Silk Road market was still operational.

    Silk Road's owner, who is known by the alias Dread Pirate Roberts or DPR, posted the following comment on his site's forums Friday morning in an attempt to quell growing concern by the site's users: "Silk Road has not been compromised even if the allegations are true. Neither had access to sensitive material. I will make an announcement later to address the concerns this has raised."

    This is the only announcement from Dread Pirate Roberts so far; he has not replied to Mashable's multiple inquiries sent via Twitter and Silk Road's forums. We will continue to update this story as we receive more information.

    Read the entire indictment below.
    Indictment of three alleged Silk Road moderators

    mashable.com
    Last edited by Mid; 21-12-2013 at 03:29 PM.

  19. #19
    Member
    harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    Today @ 07:45 PM
    Posts
    60,424
    They obviously didn't know that Tor has been compromised.

  20. #20
    Member
    Bettyboo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Last Online
    Today @ 08:09 PM
    Location
    Bangkok
    Posts
    30,085
    There is (or at least there was...) a really nice restaurant in UB called Silk Road. Just sayin like...

  21. #21
    Thailand Expat
    Latindancer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Last Online
    Today @ 06:23 PM
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    11,797
    Silk Road mastermind jailed for life

    The American convicted of masterminding the criminal website Silk Road was sentenced in court Friday to life in prison over the online enterprise that sold $200 million in drugs to customers worldwide.

    It was the maximum possible punishment for Ross Ulbricht, who was convicted in February by a jury on seven counts of narcotics trafficking, criminal enterprise, computer hacking and money laundering.
    The 31-year-old Texan with a graduate degree displayed no emotion as he stood in dark prison scrubs to hear his fate read by Federal Judge Katherine Forrest, as his devoted parents sat in the packed gallery.
    Ulbricht, who ran Silk Road under the alias "Dread Pirate Roberts" and was accused of commissioning five murders at a cost of $650,000, was sentenced to two life sentences for narcotics distribution and criminal enterprise.
    He also received the maximum sentence of five, 15 and 20 years for hacking, trafficking in false documents and money laundering convictions.

    In the gallery, his mother put her head in her hand.
    It was a stunning fall from privilege for Ulbricht, who the government said amassed $13 million in commissions by making the purchase of heroin, cocaine and crystal meth as easy as shopping online at eBay or Amazon.
    Prosecutors said the narcotics-trafficking enterprise resulted in at least six drug-related deaths.

    - Crimes were 'unprecedented' -
    "You should serve your life in prison," Forrest told Ulbricht, saying there was no parole in the federal system.
    "What you did was unprecedented," she said. "You have to pay the consequences of this."
    Forrest said the court also sought the forfeiture of more than $183.9 million in Silk Road drug profits.
    The parents of a 25-year-old Boston man and a 16-year-old Australian schoolboy, who both died after ingesting drugs obtained from Silk Road, spoke of their devastating loss.
    "I strongly believe my son would be here today if Ross Ulbricht had never created Silk Road," said one of the parents, identified only as Richard.

    But Ulbricht made little mention of their anguish, sniffing and sobbing his way through a self-pitying statement before the court.
    He told Forrest that he wanted to "tell you about myself from my perspective," and denied that he was greedy and vain.
    He also promised that he now respected the law and would never break it again if released.
    "I'm not a self-centered, sociopathic person... I just made some very serious mistakes."
    His four-week trial had been considered a landmark case in the murky world of online crime and government surveillance.
    Given the significant public interest in the case, Forrest said his sentence had to serve as a deterrent to anyone looking to step into his shoes, and must reflect the severity of his crimes and protect society.

    - Right to appeal -
    The defense had requested the mandatory minimum sentence of 20 years and Ulbricht has the right to appeal.
    The sentence was the maximum possible under federal law on each count -- tougher even than the lengthy sentence sought by government prosecutors.
    Forrest read from chilling online messages and journal entries that she said showed Ulbricht had displayed "arrogance," knew exactly what he was doing and had an escape plan to flee the country.
    "I'm running a goddamn multi-million-dollar criminal enterprise," she read out.
    His own writings proved that he was "callous as to the consequences and the harm and suffering it may cause others," she said.
    The government said Silk Road conducted 50,000 sales of heroin, 80,000 sales of cocaine and 30,000 of methamphetamine -- highly addictive and dangerous drugs.
    Forrest said Ulbricht was no better than a common drug dealer and blind to the collateral damage to society caused by expanding the drugs market.

    "I don't know you feel a lot of remorse for the people you hurt. I don't know you know you hurt a lot of people."
    She said she found "profoundly moving" the nearly 100 letters written from family and friends testifying to a kind, intelligent and loved friend, saying that he was a "very complex" person.
    Ulbricht created the Silk Road in January 2011, and owned and operated the underground site until it was shut down by the FBI in October 2013, when he was arrested in a San Francisco library.

    The government called it "the most sophisticated and extensive criminal marketplace on the Internet" used by vendors in more than 10 countries in North America and Europe.
    https://au.news.yahoo.com/technology...mind-for-life/

  22. #22
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Last Online
    30-10-2015 @ 06:54 PM
    Posts
    127
    Fuxx these retarded judges, I hope ISIS take care of their head soon <3

  23. #23
    Member

    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Last Online
    29-06-2019 @ 04:05 PM
    Posts
    833

    Jailed

    Silk Road website founder jailed for life in New York
    Ross Ulbricht, 31, sentenced to life in jail by judge who cited six deaths from drugs bought on his 'dark web' site.

    30 May 2015 05:47 GMT | US & Canada, United States, Drugs, Online, Silk Road

    A San Francisco man who created the underground drug-selling website Silk Road has been sentenced to life in prison by a judge who cited six deaths from drugs bought on his site and five people he tried to have killed.

    Passing sentence in New York, US District Judge Katherine Forrest told 31-year-old Ross Ulbricht he was a criminal even though he did not fit the typical profile - he has two collegiate degrees - and she brushed aside his efforts to characterise the business as merely a big mistake.

    "It was a carefully planned life's work. It was your opus," she said. "You are no better a person than any other drug dealer."

    Ulbricht stood silently as Forrest announced the sentence, which also included an order to forfeit $184m.

    The Silk Road was only accessible on the dark web, a part of the internet that requires the specialist software, originally created by the US government, in order to access it.

    Ulbricht's 2013 arrest shut down what prosecutors described as an unprecedented one-stop online shopping centre where the supply of drugs was virtually limitless.

    Prosecutors said it enabled nearly 4,000 drug dealers to expand their markets from the pavement to cyberspace, selling drugs on a never-before-seen scale to more than 100,000 buyers in markets stretching from Argentina to Australia, from the US to Ukraine.

    The government said in court papers that Ulbricht left a blueprint that others have followed by establishing new "dark markets" in sophisticated spaces of the internet that are hard to trace, where an even broader range of illicit goods are sold than were available on Silk Road.

    Forrest said the sentence could show copycats there are "very serious consequences".

    Prosecutors had not asked for a life sentence, saying they only wanted substantially more than the 20-year mandatory minimum.

    'Captain of the ship'

    Ulbricht was convicted in February after being found guilty of charges including distributing drugs through the internet and conspiring to commit computer hacking and money laundering.

    Prosecutors, who said Ulbricht operated the site for nearly three years from 2011 until 2013, said he collected $18m in bitcoins through commissions on a website containing thousands of listings under categories like "Cannabis", ''Psychedelics", and "Stimulants."

    They said he brokered more than one million drug deals worth over $183m while he operated on the site under the alias Dread Pirate Roberts - a reference to the swashbuckling character in "The Princess Bride" film.

    The judge said Ulbricht's efforts to arrange the murders of five people he deemed as threats to his business was proof that Silk Road had not become the "world without restrictions, of ultimate freedom" that he claimed he sought.

    Ulbricht is also charged in Baltimore federal court in an attempted murder-for-hire scheme.

    "You were captain of the ship, Dread Pirate Roberts," Forrest said. "It was a world with laws you created. ... It was a place with a lot of rules. If you broke the rules, you'd have all kinds of things done to you."

    Prosecutors cited at least five deaths traced to overdoses from drugs bought on Silk Road, and two parents who lost sons spoke in court.

    Before the sentence was announced, a sniffling and apologetic Ulbricht told Forrest he was a changed man who is not greedy or vain by nature.

    "I've essentially ruined my life and broken the hearts of every member of my family and my closest friends," he said.

    "I'm not a self-centred sociopathic person that was trying to express some inner badness. I do love freedom. It's been devastating to lose it."

    His lawyer, Joshua Dratel, promised an appeal, calling the sentence "unreasonable, unjust and unfair".

    Outside court, Ulbricht's mother, Lyn, called the war on drugs a failure and said two of the victims in the case died during the four months that authorities investigated but did not shut down the website.

    As he left the courtroom, Ulbricht carried with him photographs of those who died as a result of drugs purchased on Silk Road.

    Source: Al Jazeera and agencies


    Silk Road website founder jailed for life in New York - Al Jazeera English

  24. #24
    Thailand Expat
    bsnub's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    18,686
    Quote Originally Posted by thefactoryoutlet
    Fuxx these retarded judges, I hope ISIS take care of their head soon
    Oh really? This sentence is absurd no doubt but ISIS can suck a dick and make sure they soon will be taking it in the ass.

  25. #25
    Neo
    Neo is offline
    Dislocated Member
    Neo's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 02:42 AM
    Location
    Nebuchadnezzar
    Posts
    10,577


    The Silk Road is an Evil We Have to Live With if We Want a Free Society

    By James O Malley on 01 Jun 2015 at 7:00PM

    Last week Ross Ulbricht - also known as pseudonym Dread Pirate Roberts - was sentenced to spend the rest of his life in jail because he founded the “Silk Road”, a website on the so-called “dark web”. That was basically eBay for all of the illegal stuff you might ever want or need.

    The way it worked was rather clever. The whole site was anonymised, requiring the use of the secretive Tor network, and payments were made in Bitcoin rather than Paypal. And the historian within me can’t help but be a little impressed with the name, calling back to the ancient east-west trade route that crossed Asia.

    The response to the jailing has been mixed - with some commentators arguing that the punishment is unfairly harsh for just the guy who set up the website. After all, he wasn’t providing the drugs and guns, just merely providing a platform on which other people could buy and sell them. Of course, on the other hand - it isn’t like he thought the secretive website was trading Beanie Babies.

    As you might imagine, when Ulbricht was arrested, the site was taken down - but just as The Pirate Bay is the whack-a-mole that won’t die, several newer iterations of The Silk Road reappeared quickly. Apparently like The Pirate Bay, the Silk Road 2.0’s new owner (also going by the Dread Pirate Roberts moniker) set it up so that the site distributes copies of its source code, so that when taken down, it can easily be revived by someone else.

    Ammunition for the Snooper's Charter


    This story comes at an interesting time for privacy campaigners. And by “interesting”, I mean “potentially terrible”, as it comes just as there is renewed interest in government surveillance: This week the American congress has voted to (temporarily) suspend blanket wiretapping - and the new Tory government in Britain looks set to once again attempt to pass the so-called “Snooper’s Charter”, which would legitimate government mass surveillance.

    The reason this could be terrible is clear: Even though (as is my view) the facts and the principles may be on the side of the privacy campaigners, it makes it much tougher to argue. After all - like it or not, unlike a figure like Edward Snowden, Ulbricht wasn’t doing something quite so responsible.



    Even if you disagree with Snowden leaking what he did, you can at least appreciate that he did it through the closest approximation to the ‘correct channels’ that whistleblowers have: He went to a journalist, who worked with a respectable newspaper to process, check and release information in a careful and considered way. Ulbricht, on the other hand, was helping shifty characters buy guns.

    What better poster-figure could there be for a kindly government protecting its citizens than a drugs kingpin like Ulbricht?
    On the face of it, you might think this is a fairly compelling argument too: why should bad guys be able to easily do bad stuff on the dark web? Shouldn’t we more closely control the places where terrorists can go to plan atrocities? And so on. David Cameron seems convinced too - earlier this year he suggested legislating to allow government access to encrypted data, which would be a terrible idea.

    But here’s the thing that nobody - especially politicians - like to admit: It probably isn’t possible to do anything about the Silk Road.

    The Trade Off


    The unfortunately reality for both sides in this perennial debate is that at its heart is the old trade off between security and liberty.

    That is to say, if you want to ensure that terrorists and drug dealers don’t succeed, then the most effective option is to tightly control circumstances so they can’t act without the state knowing - but it comes at the cost of our liberty and privacy more broadly. Conversely, you can have all of the privacy you like - but there’s an increased risk that the bad guys will exploit this. The trade off is that society must choose where to draw the line between these two mutually desirable, but fundamentally incompatible outcomes.

    And whether we realise or not, these choices are implicit in how society works. The reason we don’t get patted down whenever we board a train is because we implicitly accept a slightly increased risk of terrorist attack - and the reason we do get x-rayed when catching a plane is because at airports we’ve chosen to be slightly more cautious.

    A good trade-off analogous to this could be the debate over state-backed regulation of the press following the Leveson Report. We all watched in horror a few years ago as we learned about the phone hacking revelations, and there was a very definite sense that something must be done - but when it comes to figuring out what to do, the proposed solution is completely unworkable. Sure, we can impose draconian regulation on published content - but given how wide the definition of “published” would have to be cast, it would be the de-facto introduction of regulation of all internet speech, with anything less not actually solving the problem the law would be created to solve. Whilst doing something about the phone hackers sounds like a good thing to do - in practice, our society’s hands are tied.

    The Silk Road is much the same - we can either outlaw encryption and blanket monitor all internet traffic, meaning we have no privacy and no security - or we can opt to live in a free society, but with the Silk Road causing problems in the background.

    No Solution


    The Silk Road is essentially a new problem for society. Never before in history have we had an anonymised, encrypted trading network that would link up illegal arms dealers across the world. And when a new problem arises, our gut assumption is that something must be done.

    Unfortunately though, what we might need to admit, but what politicians can’t, is that some new problems don’t have feasible solutions. The Silk Road might be horrible, but it could be a necessary evil we have to live with, if we don’t want to fundamentally change how we live.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •