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    Falklands referendum.

    Falkland Islands vote in referendum

    Falkland Islands residents have queued to vote in a referendum to show they want to remain British.



    POLLS have closed in the Falkland Islands on the first day of a two-day vote intended to show the world that the residents want to stay British amid increasingly bellicose claims by Argentina.

    Buenos Aires has dismissed the vote as meaningless, but witnesses reported up to 90 people waiting in the rain to vote at the single polling station in the capital Stanley an hour after it opened.

    "It's an extraordinary turnout," Barry Elsby, a member of the Falklands legislative assembly, told AFP by telephone as he queued up outside the town hall behind two islanders dressed head-to-toe in the British flag.

    In a move instigated by residents themselves, 1,672 eligible voters are being asked whether they want the Falklands to remain an internally self-governing British overseas territory.
    The result, due overnight on Monday, is not in doubt but the scale of the 'yes' vote will be closely watched as a sign of the Falklanders' strength of feeling.





    "No matter what Argentina says, the rest of the world will not ignore it," said Elsby, a 57-year-old Welsh doctor who moved to the Falklands on a two-year contract in 1990 and never left.
    "I'm very proud of what we're doing today."

    Bookmaker Ladbrokes called the result "the biggest certainty in political betting history" but Argentina said the vote had no legal standing and would not affect its claim to the South Atlantic archipelago, which it tried unsuccessfully to take over in a short but bloody war in 1982.
    Britain has held the barren islands since 1833 but Buenos Aires claims what it calls "Las Malvinas" are occupied Argentinian territory.

    Diplomatic tensions have risen in recent years, fuelled by the discovery of oil near the Falklands, with Argentine President Cristina Kirchner ramping up her demands for the islands' return.
    The ambassador to Britain, Alicia Castro, this weekend branded the referendum "utterly meaningless" from the perspective of international law.
    "Its predictable outcome neither ends the dispute nor affects Argentina's unquestionable rights," she said.

    However predictable the result, the "yes" campaign has been carried out with enthusiasm.
    Homes and shops are festooned with posters and flags, both the British Union Jack and the deep blue Falklands standard which includes the Union Jack and a crest with a sheep in the middle.

    Falklanders hope the referendum result will arm them with an unambiguous message to take to other capitals when pressing their case for acceptance on the international stage.

    Argentina, 400km away, has branded the referendum "illegal" because it claims the islanders are "implanted" and thus do not have the right to self-determination.
    The Argentinian foreign ministry said on Friday that the vote was "a British attempt to manipulate" the status of the archipelago.

    London, an even further 13,000km away, says it will not discuss sovereignty issues with Buenos Aires unless the islanders expressly wish it.

    On April 2, 1982, Argentina's then-ruling junta invaded the Falklands, sparking a 74-day war with Britain which cost the lives of 649 Argentine and 255 British troops.
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    Last edited by ENT; 11-03-2013 at 01:09 PM.
    “Is it not written in your Law, ‘I said, you are gods’? John 10:34.

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    Hmm, if the Argies go to war again do you think they will still play in the Rugby Championship?

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    The Falklands Standard

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    ^ No derogatory remarks required.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Necron99 View Post
    Hmm, if the Argies go to war again do you think they will still play in the Rugby Championship?
    Depends upon how well they get on with the other sheep lovers.

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    why can't the British return Las Malinas to the natives like they did with HK and Macau ?

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    The Falklands have messed up a little here. They should have gone for independence, become a tax haven, and shared the Oil wealth 50:50 with the Uk government. Then, when they are all multi millionaires they could sell the Island to Argentina and bugger off somewhere else.

    Oh, and there is no appetite in Argentina for a war - only that stupid bitch clinging onto power for dear life tryng to drum up some support. As long as the UK refuses to bite back, it will all drift away again.

    Quote Originally Posted by Butterfly
    can't the British return Las Malinas to the natives like they did with HK and Macau ?
    Feeling a little educationally challenged are you?

    1) Macau was not British.
    2) HK was returned to China, but held for a few years as a Semi Autonomous Region.
    Originally Posted by bsnub "No wonder I drive a tesla"

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    Quote Originally Posted by Butterfly View Post
    why can't the British return Las Malinas to the natives like they did with HK and Macau ?
    Which natives?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Butterfly View Post
    why can't the British return Las Malinas to the natives like they did with HK and Macau ?
    What natives?

    OOps, a bit late!!

    Yeh, what natives?

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    I assume the Argentinians since they are making a legal claim to the place,

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    Quote Originally Posted by Butterfly View Post
    I assume the Argentinians since they are making a legal claim to the place,
    because they have no legal claim.

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    well, we don't know that for sure

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    Quote Originally Posted by Butterfly
    why can't the British return Las Malinas to the natives like they did with HK and Macau ?
    They don't want to because there is a slim chance that the uk can embarrass France on the world stage again by catching them trying to sell missiles to the Argies.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Spin
    trying to sell missiles to the Argies.
    They didn't try and sell them, they did sell them. Then to add insult to injury, they advertised them as "battle proven" at the Farnborough Air Show late that year!!!

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    By the way the Argies call the islands Las Malvinas not Las Malinas so the are welcome to the latter but not the former :-D

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    There were never any Argentinans in the Falklands before the British arrived there. Patagonian indians, possibly visited in the past, but there's no evidence that they settled there.
    The islands were unoccupied when the first British landed there.
    Origins of European Settlement

    Like much to do with the Falklands, the origins of European settlement begin with a controversy involving the English. England’s John Davis was probably the first European to see the islands, in 1592, when his ship was blown to them in a storm, but his report was not widely published in England due to politics. Claims that Magellan discovered the islands earlier have been convincingly rejected. A further Englishman, Richard Hawkins, claimed to have found the islands in 1594. The first incontrovertible sighting was by Holland’s Sebald de Weerdt in 1600. It took a further ninety years before the first known European landings, when another Englishman, John Strong, arrived in 1690, naming the ‘sound’ between the larger islands after a fellow Britain, Viscount Falkland. The name has since spread to the whole collection of islands.

    Over the next fifty years people used the island for fresh water and scurvy negating plants; French sailors started to call them islands Malouines, which eventually evolved into Malvinas. England planned to explore the islands in 1749, but suspended their expedition, not because they ceded to Spanish claims to the islands as later suggested by Spain, but in order to temporarily avoid a dispute and secure more favourable trade agreements. In the end, European settlers arrived on January 31st 1764, when Frenchmen Louis-Antoine de Bougainville started a colony on East Falkland of ex French-Canadians.


    British settlers landed on West Falkland on January 12 1765, unaware that France had already settled a different location. Spain purchased the French settlement in 1766 (formally accepted in 1767), and in the first recorded skirmish on the islands Spain forced the British off West Falkland in 1770. This situation lasted for a year, when control of the British settlement was handed back to Britain after both the threat of outright war between the two nations and a large discussion about who had sovereignty of the islands. Thanks to vague language, the deciding agreement allowed both to claim it. However, the British settlement was withdrawn in 1774 for purely economic reasons, and the East Falkland settlement lasted until 1811. Crucially, although Britain withdrew their citizens, they did not withdraw their claim of sovereignty.

    South America enters the Frame

    With no European colonies on the Falklands, just sealers who found the islands useful, the newly independent government in Buenos Aires claimed its own sovereignty over the islands, as heirs of the Spanish empire from which they had just become independent. A businessman called Vernet formed a private settlement in 1826 on the second attempt, having gained permission from both the Buenos Aires government and a British official. When Buenos Aires appointed a governor in 1829 Britain complained that they had no right. In 1831 a US ship, acting to avenge the arrest of US seal hunters in the area, who claimed a right to the islands as heirs of Britain, destroyed the settlement.

    Thus, when Britain, worried about South America and US sealers, renewed their interest in 1833 and reactivated their dormant claim, there were only a few remaining settlers. Some left without violence, others decided to stay under the new government. The British renewed settlement, installing a civilian governor. By 1885 the settlement, based around the capital of Port Stanley, was nearing two thousand people with the main economic venture being sheep farming. However, little was invested into the island’s potential strategic importance or economic growth.
    Europe and the Falkland Islands - Malvinas - The Falkland Islands

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    Quote Originally Posted by Butterfly View Post
    I assume the Argentinians since they are making a legal claim to the place,
    That makes no logical sense even by your own twisted standards.

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    so the Brits invaded another place they didn't own legally and call it their own ?

    so it could be French or Spanish for all we know, right ?

    apparently the Argentinians are making the claim, and we all know when the Brits are involved in an invasion, it's always dodgy or done illegaly

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    So true these days, as there always backing up the septics

    Quote Originally Posted by Butterfly View Post
    so the Brits invaded another place they didn't own legally and call it their own ?

    so it could be French or Spanish for all we know, right ?

    apparently the Argentinians are making the claim, and we all know when the Brits are involved in an invasion, it's always dodgy or done illegaly

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    Quote Originally Posted by ENT
    British settlers landed on West Falkland on January 12 1765, unaware that France had already settled a different location. Spain purchased the French settlement in 1766 (formally accepted in 1767), and in the first recorded skirmish on the islands Spain forced the British off West Falkland in 1770.
    so basically, France or Spain could make the claim that it's their place too

    maybe the best option would be for everyone to fuck off from that place, since nobody agree on the legality of it

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    Quote Originally Posted by Butterfly View Post
    so the Brits invaded another place they didn't own legally and call it their own ?

    so it could be French or Spanish for all we know, right ?

    apparently the Argentinians are making the claim, and we all know when the Brits are involved in an invasion, it's always dodgy or done illegaly
    It's a bit of a distortion of language to 'invade' an uninhabited island

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    Quote Originally Posted by Butterfly View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by ENT
    British settlers landed on West Falkland on January 12 1765, unaware that France had already settled a different location. Spain purchased the French settlement in 1766 (formally accepted in 1767), and in the first recorded skirmish on the islands Spain forced the British off West Falkland in 1770.
    so basically, France or Spain could make the claim that it's their place too

    maybe the best option would be for everyone to fuck off from that place, since nobody agree on the legality of it
    Another great piece of butters logic, evacuate people from their homes and business'
    Don’t argue with idiots because they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience.

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    Quote Originally Posted by draco888
    It's a bit of a distortion of language to 'invade' an uninhabited island
    when the rats invade your empty basement, do you prefer to use the words settlement instead ? how sweet of you,

    it's funny how British Zionists also started the "settlement" of empty lands in Palestine,

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    Quote Originally Posted by Butterfly View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by ENT
    British settlers landed on West Falkland on January 12 1765, unaware that France had already settled a different location. Spain purchased the French settlement in 1766 (formally accepted in 1767), and in the first recorded skirmish on the islands Spain forced the British off West Falkland in 1770.
    so basically, France or Spain could make the claim that it's their place too

    maybe the best option would be for everyone to fuck off from that place, since nobody agree on the legality of it
    Hardly. Spain could possibly lay claim to Argentina given they are all descended from dagos from there except the odd indigenous native and Welsh folk who laid most of their railways. But no one except the British maintained a significant presence in the Falklands in the past million years so, really, I think sovereignty is pretty well established even to silly continentals, dagos and daft septics.
    France has little claim to anything except a need for self indulgence and an unlimited supply of suppositories.

    About time the frogs gave up Guadeloupe though.

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    Quote Originally Posted by thegent
    About time the frogs gave up Guadeloupe though.
    as soon as you leave the Malvinas

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