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Bangkok Temple Photos

Explore the Temples of Bangkok through photos, just click on the links to take you to the thread the photos are on, or check out our 100 Best Asia Photos, 30 Best Indonesia Photos, 30 Best Pattaya Photos, 30 Best Chiang Mai Photos or 30 Best Bangkok Photos.

If you have any questions on Bangkok why not post them on our Bangkok Forum.

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Wat Arun

Make sure you set aside one late afternoon to see and photograph this imposing sight at sunset with the Chao Phraya River in the foreground. These photographs will bring back beautiful memories of Bangkok.

The temple was built during the Ayutthaya period and was originally called Wat Makok after the name of the local village Tambol Bangmakok. It means "Village of Olives". Wat Arun gets its name from Aruna, the Indian god of the dawn, hence its common name The Temple of Dawn.

The location of the temple is in the area that used to be occupied by the palace of King Taksin who re-established the Siamese Kingdom after the fall of Ayuttaya more than two hundred years ago.

The main Buddha image is believed to have been designed by King Rama II.

Wat Arun, often called The Temple of Dawn, is one of the most remarkable visual identities of Bangkok. The imposing Khmer-style prang or tower is 67 metres tall and decorated with bits of porcelain that was used as ballast by boats coming from China. It is surrounded by four smaller prangs. Construction of the prangs were started by King Rama II and completed by King Rama II.

The central balcony is an ideal spot for looking across the river to The Grand Palace and The Temple of The Emerald Buddha.

Each year at the end of the three-month lent period for Buddhist monks, H. M. The King or his appointed representative travels down river in a Royal Barge Procession to present new robes to the monks. This ceremony is called Royal Tod Kathin.

How to get there : Bus routes 19, 57, 83
Open daily : 7.30 am. to 5.30 pm.
Admission fee : Baht 20
Contact : Tel : 0 2465 5640
Website : www.watarun.org
Nearby Places/Attractions: Wat Pho, National Museum ,Museum Siam

Wat Pho

This is possibly the most interesting temple in Thailand as it combines history, medical science and is a center for meditation and traditional massage training. Its official name is Wat Phrachetuphon Vimon Mangkararam Ratchaworamahawihan, although it is commonly called Wat Po.

Founded during the 16th century, Wat Pho is most famous for the golden reclining Buddha that measures 46 metres and has feet inlaid with mother-of pearl. This is the main attraction that draws visitors to the temple.

In more modern times, Wat Pho has gained international recognition as a meditation centre and for the traditional Thai massage that is both practiced and taught here.

Traditionally, temples were the schools as there was no formal education system, with monks providing basic lesson in both spiritual and secular subjects.

King Rama III turned Wat Pho into a major centre for learning in botany, geography and history.

Bas reliefs around one of the main buildings depict the story of the Ramakian which is the Thai adaption of the Indian Ramayana. For those interested in traditional Thai medicine, there is a pavilion that serves to both impart knowledge and provide treatment.

The walls have marble tablets describing basic anatomy and treatments. In the late afternoon, traditional medicine practitioners are there to dispense herbal mixtures.

Nearby, there is a cloister where you can have a traditional Thai massage for a very small payment.

** In 2008, the historic marble inscriptions in Wat Pho have been registered with UNESCO’s Memory of the World (MOW) as MOW documentary heritage for Asia and Pacific Region

How to get there : Bus routes 1, 3, 12, 25,44, 47, 53, 60, 82, 91, 501, 508
Open daily : 8.30 a.m. - 6.00 p.m.
Admission : 50 baht
Tel : 0 2222 1969 ; Thai Massage School : 0 2221 3686 . 0 2622 3550-3
Website:www.watpho.com
Nearby Places/Attractions: Grand Palace,Wat Arun, National Museum, Museum Siam

Another visit to Wat Pho.

Wat Ratchapradit Sathitmahasimaram

Situated to the north of Saran Rom Park, the temple is relatively small and covers a total area of approximately 2 rai.

It was built in the reign of King Rama IV who intended it to be a temple in the Dhammayutika Sect as well as to be one of the 3 major temples as required by an old tradition to be situated within the capital.

The place was originally a royal coffee plantation in the reign of King Rama III. With his personal donation, King Rama IV bought the plantation and had a small temple constructed there, naming it Wat Ratchapradit Sathitthammayutikaram. Later, he had the name changed to Wat Ratchapradit Sathitmahasimaram.

A place of interest in this temple is Phra Wihan Luang - the royal image hall - which houses mural paintings depicting The Royal Ceremonies over 12 Months and legend of the solar eclipse phenomenon.

Open : Daily from 8 a.m.- 6 p.m.
Admission : Free
Tel : 0 2222 08

Wat Ratchabophit

The temple is located on Fuang Nakhon Road near Wat Pho. Built by King Rama V in 1869, it was in keeping with tradition that each monarch constructed a temple to mark his reign.

The temple is a mixture of local and western styles, showing an awakening interest in new ideas and a desire to experiment with them. The exterior of the chapel is in the Thai style, but the interior is decorated in the European style.

Open : Daily from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Admission : Free
Tel : +66 2221 0904, +66 2222 3930

Wat Mahathat

This old temple was built in the reign of King Rama I. Located on Na Phrathat Road near Thammasat University, the temple houses Mahachulalongkorn Buddhist University, one of the two highest seats of Buddhist learning in Thailand and also offers meditation classes for foreigners.

Open : Daily from 7 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Admission : Free
Tel : 0 2222 6011; Meditation Centre Tel : 0 2623 5613, 0 2623 6326

Wat Suthat and the Giant Swing

A visit to Wat Suthat Thep Wararam, situated almost in the center of old Bangkok, gives you an opportunity to see both the Giant Swing and one of the first-class Royal temples.

The surrounding area is also worth exploring as there are many shops selling religious items.

The building of the temple was commissioned by King Rama I, the founder of Bangkok, in 1807. Its location is in the center of Rattanakosin Island. This was in keeping with the Buddhist belief that it is like Mount Phra Sumeru being the center of the universe.

Phra Sri Sakayamunee, the principal Buddha image, was moved from Wat Mahathat in Sukhothai to be placed in Phra Wihan Luang in Wat Suthat in 1808.

Wat Suthat is surrounded by an impressive wall 1.94 metres high and 0.85 metres thick.

There are a total of 15 doorways leading into the temple compound. Within the temple grounds the most important building is the Phra Wihan Luang which is the Royal Temple.

The mural paintings, covering all the interior walls are some of the finest to be seen anywhere. Each has stone inscriptions describing the pictures.

Surrounding the Royal Temple is Phra Wihan Khot terrace which is really impressive with 156 Buddha statues, mostly in the seated meditative attitude called Smathi.

The chapel, Phra Ubosot at Wat Suthat is possibly the most beautiful in Thailand and is also the largest measuring 72.25 metres in length and 22.60 metres in width.

There are four pavilions (sala) within the compound that are elevated to the height of the temples walls. These are used for various royal functions and for viewing the previous functions at the Giant Swing in front of the temple.

The annual ceremony was held up until the 1930s but was discontinued to the high fatality rate as young men tried to swing high enough to grab a sack of gold on a pole about 25 metres in the air.

How to get there : Bus routes 12, 15, 42, 73, 96, 508
Open daily : 8.30 am. to 9.00 pm.
Admission fee : Baht 20
Contact : Tel: 02 224 9845
Website : www.watsuthat.org
Nearby Places/Attractions: Democracy Monument, Golden Mountain

Wat Bowon Niwet

This temple is located on Phra Sumen Road in the Bang Lamphu area. Built in 1829, it is the shrine-hall of Phra Phutthachinnasi, a very beautiful Buddha image which was molded in about 1357.

This is one of the most important temples of Bangkok, whose one-time chief abbot was King Rama IV before he ascended the throne. King Rama IV and King Rama VII, as well as His Majesty King Bhumibol Adulyadej had resided here during their monkshood.

Open : Daily from 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Admission : Free
Tel : 0 2281 2831-3
Nearby Places/Attractions: Khaosan Road., Democracy Monument, Phra Athit Road

Wat Intharawihan

It is an awesome feeling to stand before this Buddha image that reaches to the sky at 32 metres tall.

During the reign of King Rama I he suppressed a rebellion in Laos and brought members of the Lao royal family to settle in this area. One of these was Chao Inthawong, who was a devout Buddhist, helped to restore the local temple which is now Wat Intharawihan.

In 1867, Somdej Phra Buddhachan started the construction of this giant Buddha called Luang Pho To, logs and structural steel were used as alternate abutments. After his death in 1872 construction continued until completion in 1927. This spanned the reigns of King Rama IV to King Rama VII.

Luang Pho To stands 32 metres tall and is 11 metres wide. As it faces east, it is best photographed in morning light.

On two occasions, in 1964 and 1967, Their Majesties The King, The Queen and their children covered this statue of Buddha at the Topknot and forehead with gold leaves.

The Topknot contains relics of The Lord Buddha which were donated by the Government of Sri Lanka and placed there in 1978 by H.R.H The Crown Prince Vachiralongkorn.

For Bangkoks Bi-Centennial Celebrations in 1982, the then Abbot, Phra Khru Woraphattikhun carried out restoration including decoration with 24 K golden mosaics from Italy.

Devotees believe that Luang Pho To can bless everyone with success, particularly if they present the head of a mackerel fish, a boiled egg and a lei of flowers.

Location: Wisutthikasat Road near Bank of Thailand, Phra Nakorn District
How to get there : Bus routes 10, 49
Open daily : 8.30 a.m. - 8 p.m.
Admission : Free
Tel : 0 2628 5550-2
Nearby places/attractions: Banglamphu area, Thewet area and Bank of Thailand

Wat Saket and the Golden Mount

This landmark, on the only hill in Bangkok, it is of great significance for all followers of The Lord Buddha. 320 stairs take you up to the top for panoramic views of the Rattanakosin Island.

The Golden Mount is on a man-made hill with a diameter of 500 metres and soars 100 metres to the sky. There was a small chedi on this site and after it collapsed, King Rama III commissioned the construction of a much larger one which was completed during the reign of King Rama V.

In 1877, King Rama V brought the Buddha relic in the custody of the Royal Chakri family from the Grand Palace to the Royal Pavilion at Wat Saket. It was then enshrined in the in the pagoda on top of the Golden Mount.

Two decades later, Marquis Curzon, the British Viceroy of India, presented more Buddha relics near the Nepalese border to King Rama V. These were enshrined in a bronze pagoda in 1899 and installed on the top of the Golden Mount.

The temple, Wat Saket, was built during the reign of King Rama I and is the location for a festival each November that includes a climb to the top of the Golden Mount.

How to get there : Bus route 15, 37, 47, 49
Open daily : 7.30 am. - 5.30 pm.
Admission : 10 baht
Tel : +66 2621 0576
Nearby Places/Attractions: Wat Ratchanatdaram, Democracy Mounment, Wat Suthat

Wat Benchamabophit

To stand at the main gateway and look upon the Monastery of Five Kings is a sight to behold. The perfect symmetry and proportions will inspire admiration of this architectural masterpiece.

Wat Benchamabophit Dusitvanaram is known to foreigners as The Marble Temple as its exterior is clad in Carrara marble. The very talented The Prince Naris, a son of King Rama IV , designed the main building which was completed during the reign of King Rama V.

The interior crossbeams are decorated with lacquer and gold. The walls of the spacious inner courtyard are lined with a large collection of bronze Buddha images. The canal in front and to the left hand side has ornate bridges.

It is advisable to come in the early morning to see local people offering alms to the monks as they do not go outside as monks at other temples do. Stand at the main entrance to the compound and watch the pigeons take flight. If you cant be there at this time, go at sunset when the main doors are illuminated. This is another sight well worth witnessing.

How to get there : Bus routes 72, 503
Open : Daily from 6 a.m. - 6 p.m.
Admission : 20 Baht
Tel : 0 2281 2501, 0 2628 7947

Wat Ratchaburana (Bangkok)

This temple is located at the foot of the Rama I Memorial Bridge on the Bangkok side. Built in the late Ayutthaya period by a Chinese merchant, it is otherwise known as Wat Liap and is one of the 3 principal temples of the capital which include Wat Ratchaburana, Wat Ratchapradit and Wat Mahathat.

It had been regularly restored since the reign of King Rama I through to the reign of King Rama VII, except in the sixth reign.

Some of the temples principal buildings, especially Phra Ubosot the ordination hall which houses mural paintings by Khrua In Khong, were badly damaged by bombing during World War II. The buildings were later restored to the condition as they appear today.

Location : Chakkraphet Road, Wangburapha Subdistrict, Phra Nakorn District, Bangkok
Open : Daily from 6 a.m. - 6 p.m.
Admission : Free
Tel : 0 2225 1595
Nearby places/attractions: Pak Klong Talat, Memorial Bridge (Saphan Phut)

Wat Ratchanatdaram

Located on Mahachai Road, the temple was built in the reign of King Rama III in 1846. Loha Prasat, the temples main attraction, standing 36 metres high with 37 surrounding spires, is the only one of its kind left in the world. Next to the temple is the area for welcoming important foreign guests and a memorial statue of King Rama III.

Open : Daily from 8 a.m.- 5 p.m.
Admission : Free
Tel : +66 2224 8807, +66 2225 5749
Nearby Places/Attractions: Democracy Monument, Golden Mountain

Wat Thepthidaram

Located on Mahachai Road, the temple was built in the reign of King Rama III with a mixture of Chinese architectural styles. Sunthon Phu, one of Thailand’s greatest poets, had resided in this temple during his monkshood from 1840 - 1842.

Open : Daily from 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Admission : Free
Tel : 0 2222 5067
Nearby Places/Attractions; Wat Ratchanatdaram, Golden Mountain

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