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Thread: Sublime Stoke

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    Molecular Mixup
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    its a friendly enough place, stayed there for a few months in the 1980,s

    are those oatcakes easy to make ? , I used to like those

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    Gohills flip-flops wearer
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    Dear sabaii etc.

    Bloody ard fer argue.


    Way to much Trent water consumed.

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    Gohills flip-flops wearer
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    Quote Originally Posted by blue
    are those oatcakes easy to make ?
    Yes and no.

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    Neo
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    Nowt queer as folk.

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    Member Mad Hatter's Avatar
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    OAT CAKES

    Quote Originally Posted by withnallstoke View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by blue
    are those oatcakes easy to make ?
    Yes and no.
    Don't know about making oat cakes but I can tell you they are delicious. WNS treated me to some many, many years ago - I always remember that. And the Burton Bitter Beer is great as well.

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    Member Mad Hatter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mad Hatter
    Don't know about making oat cakes but I can tell you they are delicious. WNS treated me to some many, many years ago - I always remember that. And the Burton Bitter Beer is great as well.
    But then again after seeing this I can understand why WNS left:


    RIP Great Britain, RIP England, RIP Stoke-On-Trent.

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    Molecular Mixup
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    Here's one Staffordshire oatcake recipe
    7 stages and flipping is involved ......
    too hard for me
    Recipe for North Staffordshire Oatcake
    would guess the plain flour option might be best- enough fibre in the oatmeal !
    Ingredients

    • 225g fine oatmeal
    • 225g wholewheat or plain flour
    • 1tsp salt
    • 15g yeast
    • 450ml warm milk
    • 450ml warm water
    • 1tsp sugar
    Method

    1. Mix the water and milk together.
    2. Mix the salt to the flour and oatmeal in a large bowl.
    3. Dissolve the yeast with a little warm liquid and add the sugar. Allow the mixture to become frothy.
    4. Mix the dry ingredients with the yeast liquid to make a batter adding the remainder of the warm liquid.
    5. Cover the batter with a clean cloth and leave in a warm place for about an hour.
    6. Pour out enough batter on a well-greased griddle to make an oatcake of about 22cm. The surface will be covered in holes as it cooks.
    7. Flip the oatcake after 2-3 minutes when the top side has a dry appearance and the underneath is a golden brown colour and cook for another 2-3 minutes.
    Notes:

    TIP:

    Try to use the heaviest frying pan available as this will keep the heat constant which is best for making oatcakes.

    and here's what they should look like


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    Member Mad Hatter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by blue
    Here's one Staffordshire oatcake recipe
    7 stages and flipping is involved ......
    too hard for me
    Recipe for North Staffordshire Oatcake
    would guess the plain flour option might be best- enough fibre in the oatmeal !
    Ingredients
    225g fine oatmeal
    225g wholewheat or plain flour
    1tsp salt
    15g yeast
    450ml warm milk
    450ml warm water
    1tsp sugar
    Method
    Mix the water and milk together.
    Mix the salt to the flour and oatmeal in a large bowl.
    Dissolve the yeast with a little warm liquid and add the sugar. Allow the mixture to become frothy.
    Mix the dry ingredients with the yeast liquid to make a batter adding the remainder of the warm liquid.
    Cover the batter with a clean cloth and leave in a warm place for about an hour.
    Pour out enough batter on a well-greased griddle to make an oatcake of about 22cm. The surface will be covered in holes as it cooks.
    Flip the oatcake after 2-3 minutes when the top side has a dry appearance and the underneath is a golden brown colour and cook for another 2-3 minutes.
    Notes:

    TIP:

    Try to use the heaviest frying pan available as this will keep the heat constant which is best for making oatcakes.
    FFS - You need to be a German chemist to understand all that. Them lot down in S-O-T don't know how to string two words together never mind follow a recipe.

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    Stayed near Leek, which is near Stoke, at the back-end of last year with my Thai lady, on the edge of the Peak District, really nice place, great brekky, but instead of fried bread, oatcakes were served, stuffed with cheese, double yummy, made a great breakfast brilliant.

    And there was me thinking it was a Derbyshire, not Staffordshire thing......?

    http://www.3shoesinn.co.uk/index.html

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    Gohills flip-flops wearer
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    The last time i went back to England, a mate picked me up at Madchester airport and fourty minutes later i was outside an oatcake shop in Stoke scoffing down on bacon cheese and mushroom oatcakes.



    Quote Originally Posted by caller
    oatcakes were served, stuffed with cheese, double yummy, made a great breakfast brilliant.


    Quote Originally Posted by Mad Hatter
    Don't know about making oat cakes but I can tell you they are delicious.
    Oatcakes.
    Almost worth going back for.

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    splendid and tremendous
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    ^ I sold them in my pub in Samui for a bit - if you can remember?

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    Gohills flip-flops wearer
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    ^ Of course i can remember!
    I cooked the bastards.
    Half a dozen expat Stokies from Aus, New Zealand, and Samui scoffing oatcakes in Lamai was quite an experience.
    Bacon, cheese and mushroom filling, with a peppered tomato dip.
    Tasted better than the dogs bollocks.

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    Member ribblerat's Avatar
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    Ahhhh !! Oatcakes truly one of the more endearing qualities of the Midlands ...

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    sabaii sabaii
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    Word of the Wick ( week )

    DINNER


    Stand by. Its complicated!

    A pottery worker's dinner is eaten in the middle of the day, at lunchtime (dinnertime).

    In the 19th Century when potters worked very long hours in factories then the lunch break could last as long as 2 hours when a cooked meal was taken, prepared over a stove or on the hob (thob) of a bottle oven, or fetched from the nearby home. Lobby was a favourite. As was bacon fried on a No.8 British Standard Shovel (but not a spade) heated in the blazing mouth of a bottle oven being fired.
    In the mid 20th century works canteens appeared and they often became important for socialising with clubs and societies being formed. For example at Spode, in Stoke, there was an important choir and a drama group which performed in the canteen. At Twyford’s canteen in Cliffe Vale, Stoke, a full sized stage was built with the proscenium arch designed by Gordon Forsyth.

    In the late 20th century working hours decreased and breaks became shorter. Often lunch became just a snatched ‘pace’ sometimes taken at the bench.

    A proper dinner comprises of what is often associated with a 'Sunday Lunch'. Roast meat, potatoes and at least 1 vegetable (in The Potteries this can be 3 or 4 or 5 or 6 different vegetables) with lots of gravy. Still served in some pubs everyday of the week in North Staffordshire there seems to be a challenge as to how much gravy a flat plat will actually hold without spilling. So dinner is lunch unless it is Christmas Dinner when it really is a dinner at lunchtime, or just after lunchtime but before the Queen’s speech.

    Dinner could be taken at teatime for tea after work. But this is not afternoon tea which is between lunch and dinner or tea and dinner. You can of course have a dinner for tea - the evening meal. In one Lightwood household the question would arise 'Are we having a dinner for tea?'

    Some readers, particularly Southerners, may need a lie down at this point!

    Tea is drunk is copious amounts during the potter's day but tea is the main meal of the day, actually dinner. A really hungry potter might sneak a bit of his dinner at breakfast which was a couple of hours after he started work maybe signalled by the factory bell or siren. So if he really did have his dinner for his breakfast then he would have no dinner left for his lunch and would have to wait till he got home for his tea and had a proper dinner. In any case he should be having pobs for his breakfast with a pot of tea. Unless, of course, he worked shifts in which case his breakfast actually would be his dinner. Then he would have another dinner at teatime. Perhaps a Wrights pie or oatcake and cheese.

    A potter might go out for a meal and if it was a posh affair it would be a 'dinnerin' which required dressing up. A works dinnerin was often just before Christmas, sometimes paid for by the boss. This would be held after teatime but before supper which might be a pace of cheese and maybe tea just before bed. This was not a posh person’s supper which was a dinner or evening meal, served after tea.

    Any dinner left over after tea would be orts and they could be had the following day, warmed up, on thob.
    So now you know.


    Word of the Wick (week) - woolliscroft.org

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    Gohills flip-flops wearer
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    ^ Thats cleared up a point of confusion.
    Took me many a year to figure out why posh people had their dinner in the evening, when it was infact teatime. Apparently, posh folk (and southerners) have invented a new mealtime called lunch, which is daft, because it seems to coincide with dinner time.

    On another point, the word pace in the above post is dialect spoken with an accent. The word is piece (or piecey if talking to a young 'un) and is pronounced as pace with the Potteries accent. The piece is what southerners might call a sandwich - A bit of bread wrapped around lard or dripping.

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    Quote Originally Posted by withnallstoke View Post
    Tasted better than the dogs bollocks.
    You Northerners eat some strange food.

    Now fresh cod and chips on Southend seafront, there's food...

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    Quote Originally Posted by sabaii sabaii
    As was bacon fried on a No.8 British Standard Shovel (but not a spade)
    I believe that the preferred brand for ultimate flavour was Spear and Jackson

    I went through stoke on my way up North from Brum. Lots of boarded up houses as we passed through on the coach.

    My brother went to Stoke Poly 'cause he never expected to pass his A-levels. He said that on the first day, many were asked 'why did you choose Stoke poly?' Many gave a similar answer.

    Still, he had many a grand night out up there

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    Quote Originally Posted by sabaii sabaii
    Dinner could be taken at teatime for tea after work. But this is not afternoon tea which is between lunch and dinner or tea and dinner. You can of course have a dinner for tea - the evening meal. In one Lightwood household the question would arise 'Are we having a dinner for tea?'
    but if you're a 'Scouse get' it's all scran

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    Have you got any cheese Thetyim's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rocksteady
    I believe that the preferred brand for ultimate flavour was Spear and Jackson
    Yes, the Spear & Jackson Mark 7
    That's the one with the copper rivets and the beveled edges.
    If you don't believe me ask Eric Olthwaite

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    [quote=withnallstoke;1780755]The last time i went back to England, a mate picked me up at Madchester airport and fourty minutes later i was outside an oatcake shop in Stoke scoffing down on bacon cheese and mushroom oatcakes.

    #1: Northern shithole.

    #2: near-Northern shithole.

    It doesn't get much worse than that...

    Would I go there, ever...
    How do I post these pictures???

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    But you would lack context for the rest of the world. Stoke's in a league of its own

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    Thailand Expat
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    spent a couple of hours behind bars
    at her majesty's pleasure.

    i wos innocent of course.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bettyboo
    Would I go there, ever...
    Quote Originally Posted by Rocksteady
    But you would lack context for the rest of the world. Stoke's in a league of its own
    I've been to Issan... same same...

  25. #25
    sabaii sabaii
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    Rocksteady, take no notice of Betty, she's a Tracter Boy

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