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    Touring North Wales

    A bit here from The net.

    It's good stuff too.

    Betws-y-Coed is North Wales' most popular inland resort.
    It is where the River Conwy meets its three tributaries flowing from the west, the Llugwy, the Lledr and the Machno.
    Much of it was built in Victorian times and it is the principal village of the Snowdonia National Park.


    Set in a beautiful valley in the Snowdonia Forest Park, it is ideal for outdoor activity holidays. Numerous Craft and outdoor activity shops are in the village with the popular Swallow Falls nearby.

    It’s has a wonderful setting surrounded by dense woodland and magnificent mountain country is only part of the answer.
    The beauty of the area is enhanced by cascading waterfalls, hill-top lakes, river pools and ancient bridges.
    Ever since the Victorian artists flocked to the area and formed the first artist colony it has been a mecca for those that appreciate its unique natural beauty.


    The main street, Holyhead Road, has numerous inns and bed-and-breakfasts.
    Shops specialise in outdoor clothes and the tourist center provide maps and advice on day trips in the area.

    At the railway station is a Museum with a miniature railway, shop and restaurant.
    The old 14th century church of St Michael's is one of the oldest in Wales and is worth viewing.

    Of exceptional interest are the many bridges in the area. Pont-y-Pair (the bridge of the cauldron), built in 1468, is buffeted by foaming water after heavy rain.
    A number of sign-posted walks in the surrounding countryside start near this bridge.
    A mile or so away is the Miner's Bridge, on the road to Capel Curig, where the miners crossed the river on a steep ladder to their work.

    Thomas Telford's iron Waterloo Bridge built in 1815, which carries the A5 across the River Conwy, bears the cast iron inscription "This arch was constructed in the same year the battle of Waterloo was fought". Also worth visiting are the awesome Conwy Falls off the road to Pentrefoelas and the beautiful Fairy Glen off the A470 where the River Conwy flows through a narrow gorge.

    Local History

    Stone Age man lived in the area and was responsible for the Neolithic Burial Chamber at Capel Garmon.
    During the Bronze Age (at about 2000 BC) the Beaker Folk who originated from Spain sailed into Britain, bringing with them metal-working, although they did not penetrate into the mountainous areas which remained the preserve of the Neolithic people.
    The Celts arrived from Central Europe about 600 BC introducing the use of bronze and later iron-working.
    They developed tools bringing improvements in agriculture and during this period the roots of a distinctive Welsh life and culture can be detected.
    These Celts were known as the Britons.

    The Romans invaded Britain in AD43 and by AD78 the conquest of Wales was complete.
    The lives of the Celtic peoples was not greatly affected in the area as the Romans were largely confined to their hill forts and roads.
    However the Romans left a legacy of improved agricultural practices (including the introduction of sheep) and mining technology when they left Wales in AD383, as well as introducing Christianity.

    After the Romans left, much of Britain was overrun by the pagan Anglo-Saxons and others from the continent, and the Picts of Scotland and the Irish also attacked the Celtic Britons.
    This was the period of the Arthurian Legends, but the area around Snowdonia remained a Celtic stronghold, although the Welsh became separated from their Celtic cousins in Cornwall and Cumbria.

    The area was part of the Kingdom of Gwynedd which covered north west Wales, although its borders changed depending on the fortunes of its ruler at the time.
    Although England was conquered by the Normans in 1066, Wales was not successfully conquered for over 200 years and it was during this period that many castles were built such as Dolwyddelan by the Welsh and Conwy by the Normans.

    During this time Wales was perhaps at its strongest when Gwynedd was under the rule of Llewelyn ap Iorwerth also known as Llewelyn Fawr (Llewelyn the Great).
    He was born in Dolwyddelan, succeeded in uniting Wales when King John was on the English throne and had a lot of connections with this area.

    With the final conquest of Wales by Edward I, and the death of Llewelyn ap Gruffudd, Prince of Wales (grandson of Llewelyn Fawr) in 1283, Wales was ruled by the English.
    This was the last Celtic rule until Merlin's prophecy came true and the Welsh Tudors took the throne of England.

    During the Tudor period laws discriminating against the Welsh were repealed which led to the prominence of local families such as the Wynns of Gwydir.

    The local economy was based on agriculture, and in the 19th century slate quarrying and woollen mills were developed.
    The slate quarries are now shut down, but agriculture continues to be the mainstay of the economy along with tourism which developed in Victorian times.

    Up in the hills at nearby Capel Garmon there is a celebrated cromlech; a 5,000 year old Neolithic burial chamber. There are also spectacular views of the mountains of Snowdonia from Capel Garmon.

    Swallow Falls

    The Swallow Falls are considered to be one of the loveliest spots of North Wales.
    Here the river rushes down from the mountains.
    Crags and jagged rocks divide the stream into a number of foaming cascades.
    A mile further on are the famous Swallow Falls, where the Llugwy river hurls itself into a spectacular chasm.

    The Local Cuisine

    The following is an extract from an American Tourist Website, where visitors post their personal experiences of visiting the UK. This one is about Betwy-y-Coed:
    ‘A long bike ride or hike in the chilly Welsh air, sometimes with a light drizzle as an accompaniment, will help diet-conscious tourists understand why traditional Welsh cuisine is heavily dependent on butter and cheese.

    Welsh rarebit - a dish consisting of cheese sauce with a mustard tang poured over buttered toast - might sound like a heavy dish for a midday meal, but it seems natural in the Welsh climate.
    You can try the rarebit at Tu Hwnt I'r Bont, a 15th-century stone cottage in Llanwrst, on the other side of the Gwydyr Forest from Betws-y-Coed.

    The teahouse, which sits on a riverbank, its roof level to the road, is prepared for tourists: Its dark, low ceiling beams bear warnings for diners to "watch your head" in languages ranging from German to Arabic.

    The Welsh cuisine, which locals concede once was heavy and laden with fatty meats, has recently become more refined.

    The Glamorgan sausages at the Riverside restaurant in Betws, for example, are served with a light, chunky tomato sauce accented by leeks.
    Glamorgan sausages are touted as the original vegetarian dish, created by the Welsh out of vegetables and cheese for times when meat was pricey or scarce.

    For those who haven't tired of dairy products, afternoon tea is served with buttered bara brith, a loaf bread similar to - but lighter than - fruitcake. ’

    The Welsh Culture

    Visitors to Betws-y-Coed, as with other towns in North Wales, will hear the locals speak Welsh. This warm croeso, or welcome, is itself part of the Welsh culture - expressed through the bilingual signs that greet tourists in every small town.

    In the past the English outlawed the Welsh language but it lived on through the singing, reciting and storytelling that are a part of Welsh daily life. The recent development of the National Assembly for Wales had produced a heightening sense of national identity, allowing foreigners a greater opportunity to experience Welsh culture .

    Capel Curig

    At the very heart of the National Park, this rugged mountain village is the mecca for climbing and walking in Snowdonia. Ringed by the Glyders, Moel Siabod and the foothills of the Carneddau range, Capel Curig is the home of Plas-y-Brenin - the national centre for mountain activities. Also at Capel Curig is Ty Hyll (The Ugly House), so named because of the huge uneven boulders in its walls. It is now the home of the Snowdonia Society.

    Photo:- Waterloo Bridge at Betws-y-Coed has carried the A5 traffic since 1815.



    Dolwyddelan Castle must be the most dramatically sited castles in Wales, built by the native Welsh prince Llwelyn the Great. The views over Snowdonia from the castle are superb.
    The Wales 2000 Network

    Click on the town name below to visit other areas of Wales
    Aberdovey Aberystwyth Amlwch Bala Barmouth Beaumaris Betws-y-Coed Caernarfon Chester ChirkColwyn Bay ConwyDenbigh Flintshire Harlech Holyhead Llanberis Llandrindod Llandudno Llangollen Oswestry Pwllheli Porthmadog Rhayader Rhyl Ruabon Ruthin Snowdonia St Asaph Welshpool Wrexham PhotosOld Photos


    But today I have driven two hundred and fifty miles, had a great day out.

    Drove into Wales.

    I'll give full details in next day or two, it's getting late now and I'm tired.

    Swallow Falls though at 'Betws Y Coed' were fantastic, brilliant.



    The Cauldron was bubbling.



    It was throwing it down when we left the north.

    The weather in Wales, apart from a couple of very light showers was superb.

    The last thirty or forty miles home was in horrendous driving conditions. Day turned into night.



    The actual day was brilliant though. We went down some very narrow lanes in the Welsh countryside.



    We were extremely impressed by some of the beautiful places we came to. I'm sure the next few days will make for good reading and viewing on here.

    The heavy rains of late had really enhanced the water falls.



    This was a photograph taken just a few hours ago at Pontcysyllte, we were walking on top of the aqueduct which carries the Llangollen Canal across the River Dee.

    It is an absolute amazing feat of engineering. I'll write much more up on the same and put some additional photographs on here in the next few days.

    ** I was pointed in the right direction for this amazing aqueduct some two months or more since by Propagator on this thread and I'm taking the opportunity of thanking him for that. Cheers Pal, it was an amazing experience.





    Back to the trip.

    First port of call yesterday was St Winifrides Well, at Holywell North Wales.

    It quite amazes me how certain tales of old create so much interest and so many side issues.

    These are the basics regarding the same, which I have to say are interesting:-


    St. Winifred's Well was an important place for pilgrims to visit during the Middle Ages. The story is told of how in the 7th century a young prince, Caradoc, visited Tegeingle near the mouth of the River Dee. Caradoc saw a pretty young girl called Winifred and made advances towards her. Winifred rejected and then ran towards the church. Caradoc, furious for being treated in this way, chased after her and cut off her head with a sword.
    The head rolled down the hill towards the church. Winifred's father, Beuno, was just leaving the church and realizing what had happened, "cursed Caradoc so that he fell dead". Beuno lifted the head, wrapped it in his cloak and returned to Mass, where he asked the people to help him with their prayers for Winifred. He then joined the "head to her body and she at once revived, and afterwards bearing only a red threadlike mark around her throat."
    Legend has it that where Winifred's head had fallen "the stones surrounding the fountain were stained forever with her blood, and the blood falling in the water coloured also the moss that grows there and which has the perfume of frankincense, though some say of violets."
    A well was built where Winifred's head fell and people believed in the Middle Ages that its water had a curative quality. Therefore people visited St. Winifred's Well seeking physical help rather than a pilgrimage of penance.
    On 23rd November, 1851, Pope Pius IX granted indulgences to pilgrims who visited St. Winifred's Well. This increased the number of visitors but on 5th January, 1917, disaster struck when the spring, which had been bubbling at the rate of twenty-one tons a minute, went suddenly dry. The reason for this was that tunneling by a local lead-mine company, had caused the water to drain away into the River Dee. Later that year the lead-miners had managed to divert another underground stream to restore the supply of water.


    St. Winifred's Well, Holywell

    It's an extremely impressive old church, that's for sure.



    There's an outside type of bathing pool area which enables the faithful to bathe in the spring water and say various prayers.

    Apparently there is quite a good response to the 'healing powers' of the water.



    Inside the building there were quite a large number of crutches and other walking aid paraphernalia, which had been discarde by the 'healed'

    You can see from this photograph that there are several tent type modesty units to allow folk to change prior to bathing in the water.



    I always look at these places with considerations that if they each do one person any good, it's alright, carry on. It's not like there is a massive fee or any fee above a few 'bob' admission and no claims are made to the same being a cure for anything. It's a kind of faith thing, if it works for some. So mote it be.


    There are additional wells, or bathing places inside the Church building.



    Personally I was really impressed with the architecture.



    I'm not at all sure how old the building section above is, it's obviously clocking on a fair bit, there are more modern additions to the Church in general throughout the grounds as well.

    This information is quite interesting though.

    Holywell first enters written history in 1093, when 'Haliwel' was presented to St Werburgh's Abbey, Chester. In 1240, the Welsh prince Dafydd ap Llewelyn, once more in control of this area in Wales, gave the holy well and church to the newly-established Basingwerk Abbey; and the Cistercian monks cared for the well and its pilgrims until the Reformation.

    Winifred's fame, and with it the fame of the Well, continued to spread throughout the middle ages, but little is factually recorded about the pilgrimage. By 1415, her feast had become a major solemnity throughout Wales and England. Kings could be found among her pilgrims. Henry V came in 1416. Richard III maintained a priest at the Well. But it was during the reign of the Welsh Henry VII that devotion reached its pinnacle, with the building of the present well-shrine under the patronage of Henry's mother, Margaret Beaufort.


    Such glory was short lived, though the Well's fame was never eclipsed. The Reformation swept away shrines and pilgrimages; but no attempt ever quite succeeded in destroying devotion to St Winifred at her Well. Through all the years of religious persecution, pilgrims, Catholic and non-Catholic alike, continued to visit Holywell. It became the centre of Catholic resistance. James II and his queen visited the Well in 1686, to pray for an heir. But James was exiled, and the persecution renewed. Through these long years, Holywell and its pilgrims were served by the Jesuits. They wrote popular Lives of the saint; and even kept inns in the town, where Mass could be said in comparative safety.


    In the nineteenth century, after Catholic Emancipation, it was the Jesuits who oversaw and directed the spectacular renaissance of the pilgrimage. A church opened in the town in the 1840's was constantly enlarged and enriched. A pilgrim's hospice was erected shortly afterwards. And under Fr. Beauclerk in the 'nineties, the pilgrimage underwent a revival of medieval proportions. Pilgrims came literally in thousands, necessitating a branch rail line into the town. The popular press gave account of each reported cure. And the sick reported cures in such numbers that Holywell came to be called the 'Lourdes of Wales'. Despite the alterations to pilgrimage patterns caused by the increasing secularism of 20th-century life, and by devotional changes within Catholicism itself, the Jesuit's heritage continues: people are still coming to Holywell on pilgrimage.


    The Well Crypt and Chapel



    Unlike Gwytherin, with the grave and other relics of the saint, or Shrewsbury Abbey, which after 1138 enshrined Winifred's body, the Holywell pilgrimage has always centred on the Well itself. A church, almost certainly on the site of the present Anglican church of St James, over-looking the Well, has stood by the Well, certainly since 1093 and probably since Winifred's own time. And there may perhaps have been a further small chapel, connected more directly with the Well. But we have no indication as to the form of the Well itself throughout the middle ages. Celtic holy wells take many individual forms, and it is possible that until the end of the fifteenth century there was no form of structure at all around the spring itself, which is what the medieval Welsh votive poems suggest.

    The sheer force of the spring would support this.


    The present glorious structure was begun around 1500 and probably took 10 or 15 years to complete. It is unique, having no parallel anywhere in Europe; and is a masterpiece of late Perpendicular architecture. It takes the form of an almost square crypt, built into the steep hillside, but open to the North through a triple arcade which gives access to the Well. In the centre the spring rises in a star-shaped basin, before flowing into an oblong bath, access to which is gained at either end by steps. All around the Well graceful columns rise to support the elaborately vaulted roof; and in the centre, directly over the source, is a large pendent boss, beautifully carved with the legend of St Winifred, but now badly worn. Originally, the spaces between the columns were filled with delicate Gothic tracery, destroyed by the Puritans. An open gallery in the west wall originally gave the pilgrim his first glimpse of the holy well as he descended from the chapel above, to enter the crypt through the now closed door. An elaborate niche houses a statue of St Winifred, placed there in 1886 to replace the original much-venerated Gothic image, which was destroyed in the seventeenth century.

    The chapel comprises a nave and a side-aisle, and is built directly over the crypt, with which it is contemporary. At its east end an apse was built out onto the hillside to contain the altar. The well-crypt has never ceased to be used for its original purpose, but the chapel has seen many changes of use, used at times as a court-house, at others as a school. In consequence, it suffered great damage, but it was thoroughly restored and re-roofed in 1976. Both the interior and exterior of the chapel are enriched with fine, and often amusing, sculptures.

    Considering the superior quality of the architecture, and the degree of technical skill required to build directly over the source of a small river, it is odd that not a single hard fact concerning its construction has survived. We do not know the name of its architect, nor the name of those who commissioned and paid for the shrine: not even the dates of its construction. The building itself yields the only clues. The emblems and coats of arms carved on the bosses of the crypt ceiling suggest the patronage of Margaret, Countess of Richmond and Derby, the pious mother of Henry VII. Margaret died in 1509. The arms of Catherine of Aragon suggest further royal patronage; and yet other badges indicate the beneficence of other noble families. Such patronage, which alone could account for the building's splendour, is also the only real clue to dating it to the first decade of the sixteenth century.

    Though its exact history will probably always remain a mystery, the shrine remains a fitting setting for the only British pilgrimage to have survived continuously for over 1300 years.


    The history is quite amazing, in my opinion anyhow.



    As mentioned before the architecture and buildings in general are wonderful.

    A pleasure to look at.


    *Edited by dirtydog so any mistakes or mess ups are mine*


    All the women take their blouses off
    And the men all dance on the polka dots
    It's closing time !

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    North Wales Betws Y Coed

    Some of the older parts of the Church, were amazing, it was a pity though to see the rate of deterioration, I hope there is concern to rectify the levels of wear and erosion which stand out so obviously.



    The UK could really start an interesting job creation scheme with renovation and or repairs of these 'Ancient Chapels, and Castles'


    A bit of lottery funding wouldn't be amiss going this way either.




    There were rooms and sections inside the old church set aside for people wishing to pray
    and light candles for their departed loved ones or other reasons.



    It's quite interesting to note from the number and thickness's of visitors books
    alone how much of an interest the Church and Well have by the volume of visitors.



    This particular area was quite striking in it's appearance and setting.



    The cemetery was obviously very ancient,
    most of the old head stones and general markers
    were covered by long grass unfortunately
    it wouldn't have been prudent to go walking about among the same.



    Although it's difficult to see from the photographs
    some of the markers were shaped quite different
    from any other markers I have noticed over the years.



    Giving consideration to the same, it is probably quite a delicate job cutting the grass
    around these graves, the markers having been there so long,
    looking rather fragile by modern standards,
    things are perhaps left best as they are.



    These particular marker stones appeared to have been removed from the cemetery and placed here to offer them protection.



    They were extremely ancient.

    We took a couple of photographs which captured the old with the new so to speak.



    They both show almost the same parts of the Church complex, but I couldn't make up my mind which was the better of the two.



    A photograph of an exceptionally nice house in a beautiful location we came across.



    It really appealed to me.

    We came across this railway station whilst we were on the road, it was rather 'cute' as Flobo put it.



    From the rear, it was obviously a residential home as well, very attractive.

    It must have been a fair sized old station, once upon a time.




    It was a nice area as well Tal-y-cafn, it's in the Conwy Valley.

    I noticed several superb looking places advertising bed and breakfast.

    I thought I'd pick one at random and place it on here.


    After Major Investment, Internal and External Refurbishment we present our new Website -
    Forbed and breakfast in north wales - The Tal-y-Cafn situated in the Conwy Valley is the ideal base to explore all that North Wales has to offer. Our warm hospitality, great food and cosy surroundings will make your stay complete. Our latest features are - an “Internet Connection” in the lobby and “Wireless Internet Access” in all our bedrooms!



    There is a choice of setting for a relaxing drink before & after dining, with log burning fires & oak beamed ceilings. The Main Bar, with wood-panelled bar provides space for diners & drinkers in a relaxed setting.
    Across the Inner Lobby, is a dining area of smaller proportions with individual, larger dining tables more suited to parties or families with younger children.
    Just off the Inner Lobby is our Snug, designed for comfort, for a relaxed drink in mind, with soft leather-look chocolate sofas & coffee tables moulded into the intriguing shaped room, with impressive ‘still-life’ historical nude paintings, gracing the warm cream & terracotta walls.



    The Bar offers a comprehensive, impressive range of house wines. We like to offer choice for all palates at a reasonable price and for the more discerning palate we do have a full wine list. We also have a minimum of two real ales at any time The bar operates normal licensing hours but additional hours can be arranged for private events & residents. Our food features fresh, regional produce creatively used in a modern British Style. We offer a selection of menus for functions, weddings & conferences – with each menu acting only as aguideline. We are able to cater for individual requirements, uniquely.
    We look forward to welcoming everyone!

    Flobo, wants to spend a couple of nights in this one..

    I have to admit to finding it really attractive as well.


    Nice isn't it.

    There was some really nice property in the area quite impressive all in all.



    How Green Is My Valley.



    The level crossing was a manually operated affair.

    I drifted a little, wondering how many of the'old steam engines' had passed through these gates in past years.

    I have a habit of doing such meanderings.

    I could hear the train coming, the whistle blowing, see and smell the smoke belching out of the chimney.


    Brilliant.



    Scenes like this, may to some people appear nothing special.

    There aren't too many stations left though looking like this, and those that are will be lucky to survive much longer no doubt.



    Quite priceless really. Perfect and then some more with the added bonus of a well stocked bird table.


    Wales really has a great deal to offer as a holiday destination or as a sight-seeing and very historical part of the UK.

    The Castles are fabulous. I think later in the year, we will do a trip and make two or three nights out of it to photograph several of the Castles.

    {If I keep making all these arrangements for travel, we will never be home}

    As it is, we were only out for the day and whilst we covered a fair mileage, we were limited as to what we could accomplish for the benefit of the thread especially.

    Betws Y Coed was beautiful, we have been in the past. In fact, I cycled to here from Manchester on the old roads in 1961. It was a hell of a ride. The hills in Wales especially are not to be scoffed at, believe me. I was on a Holdsworth Hurricane. Brilliant bicycle.


    The Swallow Falls Hotel is quite a famous landmark.

    We have never stayed there ourselves, but it is a very impressive building.



    This beautiful Hotel was purposely built in the 1900's to take advantage of the local views and proximity to Swallow Falls.

    Set in an area of outstanding natural beauty and combining the classic quality of a Victorian Coaching House with the informal ambience
    of a modern hotel, Swallow Falls Hotel affords a memorable experience to all its guests.

    Over the years the hotel has been developed into a holiday complex with the addition of a campsite and youth hostel offering the best in facilities.
    Within the hotel, the spacious bedrooms are all en-suite and benefit from panoramic views of the surrounding countryside. All of the bedrooms are centrally heated and all are equipped with remote control colour TV and hospitality trays.



    We have stayed overnight in Betws Y Coed twice with our grandsons, but they were much younger.

    We stayed at the Waterloo Hotel on the other end of town. Very nice accommodation as well.
    The Best Western Waterloo Hotel with hotel and cottage style rooms is set in the beautiful picture postcard village of Betws-y-coed amidst the remarkable beauty of Snowdonia National Park and complete with Leisure Complex it makes us the ideal base to explore the magnificent mountains, stunning passes, the breathtaking countryside scenery and the beautiful North Wales coastline either by car, coach or foot.


    The village is spectacular as well, really impressive.



    Some amazing property, quite unique in appearance and nestling beautifully into the side of the mountain.



    The little cottage on the end was for rent. It really was petite.

    The dry stone wall at the front and setts behind looked brilliant.



    These cafés are outstanding.



    There's quite a lull in the flow of the River Llugwy after the ferocity of the Swallow Falls, it runs down from the bottom of the falls alongside the road and into the village of Betws Y Coed.



    Then just behind 'The Chippy' it drops down again into the Cauldron as it meets up with the Rivers Conwy, the Lledr and Machno.



    We were quite glad we had suffered so much rain of late. The flow of the river, impact from the falls and the drop into the cauldron was spectacular,

    The power was amazing.



    It really was impressive to view all of this with the naked eye.

    It's nice to share it too.

    There are many Bridges along this main stretch and in the local vicinity. Pont-y-Pair (the bridge of the cauldron), built in 1468, is buffeted by foaming water after heavy rain. A number of sign-posted walks in the surrounding countryside start near this bridge. A mile or so away is the Miner's Bridge, on the road to Capel Curig, where the miners crossed the river on a steep ladder to their work

    I took the next couple of photographs from the Pont-y-Pair Bridge.



    You can see the power it was spectacular.



    It really pisses me off though, to see parents taking children onto dangerous and slippy rocks over waters like this. One slip and it's all over.

    You can't dig them up to say you're sorry either.



    There's some really interesting and very old history I came across here.


    Stone Age man lived in the area and was responsible for the Neolithic Burial Chamber at Capel Garmon.

    During the Bronze Age (at about 2000 BC) the Beaker Folk who originated from Spain sailed into Britain, bringing with them metal-working, although they did not penetrate into the mountainous areas which remained the preserve of the Neolithic people. The Celts arrived from Central Europe about 600 BC introducing the use of bronze and later iron-working. They developed tools bringing improvements in agriculture and during this period the roots of a distinctive Welsh life and culture can be detected. These Celts were known as the Britons.

    The Romans invaded Britain in AD43 and by AD78 the conquest of Wales was complete. The lives of the Celtic peoples was not greatly affected in the area as the Romans were largely confined to their hill forts and roads. However the Romans left a legacy of improved agricultural practices (including the introduction of sheep) and mining technology when they left Wales in AD383, as well as introducing Christianity.

    After the Romans left, much of Britain was overrun by the pagan Anglo-Saxons and others from the continent, and the Picts of Scotland and the Irish also attacked the Celtic Britons. This was the period of the Arthurian Legends, but the area around Snowdonia remained a Celtic stronghold, although the Welsh became separated from their Celtic cousins in Cornwall and Cumbria.


    The area was part of the Kingdom of Gwynedd which covered north west Wales, although its borders changed depending on the fortunes of its ruler at the time. Although England was conquered by the Normans in 1066, Wales was not successfully conquered for over 200 years and it was during this period that many castles were built such as Dolwyddelan by the Welsh and Conwy by the Normans.


    During this time Wales was perhaps at its strongest when Gwynedd was under the rule of Llewelyn ap Iorwerth also known as Llewelyn Fawr (Llewelyn the Great). He was born in Dolwyddelan, succeeded in uniting Wales when King John was on the English throne and had a lot of connections with this area.


    With the final conquest of Wales by Edward I, and the death of Llewelyn ap Gruffudd, Prince of Wales (grandson of Llewelyn Fawr) in 1283, Wales was ruled by the English. This was the last Celtic rule until Merlin's prophecy came true and the Welsh Tudors took the throne of England.


    During the Tudor period laws discriminating against the Welsh were repealed which led to the prominence of local families such as the Wynns of Gwydir.

    The local economy was based on agriculture, and in the 19th century slate quarrying and woollen mills were developed. The slate quarries are now shut down, but agriculture continues to be the mainstay of the economy along with tourism which developed in Victorian times.

    Up in the hills at nearby Capel Garmon there is a celebrated cromlech; a 5,000 year old Neolithic burial chamber. There are also spectacular views of the mountains of Snowdonia from Capel Garmon.




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    I took the above photograph from up in the mountain area to the north of Betws Y Coed, I'm about 100% certain the mountain in the distance is Snowdon.

    I'll stand being corrected on that of course, but I cannot see it being anywhere else.

    I'll put a few photographs on of the Swallow Falls themselves next visit.

    I hope this is being enjoyed, I'm enjoying recapturing the day out, it was really a great day, with some spectacular views.



    A quick one here from the falls.

    I looked on this as the creator ejaculating life onto the planet.


    Spectacular.

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    From the area of land just prior to the Cascade, the river can be seen gathering momentum as it approaches the initial fall.




    The foam on the water starts to form as it hits the heavy rocky structure on its way lower down the worn gulch.




    I managed to get into a better position further back and slightly higher up, the angle was good to obtain a neat photograph of the water as it ran over the top and began the first stage of it's plunge.



    It certainly gave an impressive roar as it thundered down the canyon and the spray was being well thrown over most sections of the viewing platforms.

    You wouldn't want to be sat on a big black inner tube for instance coming down this lot.



    I wonder how many fish get washed down those falls in the course of a day?



    They certainly looked fantastic.

    The water then ran down an extremely fast flowing section of the gorge, obviously the projecting rock formation must have been forced smooth over the thousands of years and more that this cascade had been forcing a route through the rocky mountainside.




    Nobody was coming down the chute in a boat.



    You'd never keep your hat on if you tried to swim down that little lot.



    If you look at the sides of the gorge, it's possible to get an idea of how much the water has eroded down and smoothed out over the centuries.




    The photograph above is probably a brilliant example to express the force of the fall.


    This final one is the same section of the drop from a different location.

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    This road was obviously used very little.

    Worth keeping this photograph I thought, there won't be too many roads of this calibre.




    We were more than impressed with this brilliant looking road, so much so, that I reversed back up to the cross roads and took a couple of photographs.



    The cottages were really attractive in their own right.

    The various wild flowers growing by the roadside were very neat and attractive looking. Similar to Margurites, the white ones.



    There was anice Barn conversion well under way at the bend in the road as well.

    The old Landrover was a real classic.
    I bet it's an isolated little spot on the map when the winter snow arrives though.
    I reckon between them they will burn a good few ton of coal in winter.

    Cosy though.


    The extended high reaching satellite dish was quite amusing.

    I bet they never get a same day newspaper delivery here.

    I like the saftey mirror on the end building.

    They probably only get half a dozen vehicles a year coming down there.



    __________________
    All the women take their blouses off
    And the men all dance on the polka dots
    It's closing time !

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    That really was a superb looking stretch of road and homes, we liked that.




    This was different as well.



    Spectacular location.

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    A liitle to look at here from last weeks trip. This was the River Dee at Llangollen.

    We had a nice walk around here, and a big pot of tea at the Chainbridge Hotel. Very nice it was too.




    I have a couple or so photographs already on the Photobucket site from last weeks trip so I'll put them on, quick visit this. PC should be ready to collect on Thursday, then I have to reload the new drive etc.




    The suspension bridge was closed due to it's state of repair, I smiled to myself when I thought of some of those in Thailand.

    Flobo mentioned them too, "Crikey" she said, "They'd be taking an elephant across here!"



    The Railway Station here was in fantastic condition a credit to all concerned.



    The viaducts and bridges were really interesting, they had their own little hives of activity to display.

    I have a lot more photographs and some from around the hotel, but I haven't transferred them yet, and cannot do until I get my PC back, so I will put them up at a later date.

    I scanned a menu and drink tariff from the Hotel, it's interesting, I'll put it on when things are back to normal.

    Computers... Great until they go wrong.

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    Just came across this on The net and thought i would put it up on the thread.

    It is a really nice Hotel and in a breath-taking spot by the river.


    3 for 2 - Any 3 nights for the price of 2....
    Home

    Book this hotel online now!

    The Chainbridge Hotel is located in the magnificent vale of Llangollen in North Wales. It is sited in a unique position literally overlooking the spectacular River Dee with it's racing white water and leaping salmon and the Llangollen Canal that begins it's life just a short walk away at the beautiful Horseshoe Falls. Sit in the bar or restaurant and marvel at the view which is floodlit at night.

    Flanked by one of the oldest roads (the A5), the oldest canals, the oldest steam railway line, the most famous bridge to cross the river Dee and the river Dee itself the Chainbridge Hotel could not occupy a more uniquely beautiful location. Although standing in splendid isolation the hotel is just 2 miles from the bustling town of Llangollen, which can be reached via the canal towpath or by car, horse-drawn canal boat or steam train.

    There is so much to explore locally for all ages, The Horseshoe Pass, the motor museum, the home of the famous 'Ladies of Llangollen', the working steam railway, offering trips along 12 miles of the most beautiful Welsh countryside, horse drawn boat rides along the canal, plus many ancient ruins and walks for all ages and abilities. Llangollen is also world famous for hosting the annual International Music Eisteddfod.



    We have free WiFi in selected areas including the conference room and reception area.


    As a family owned hotel, we pride ourselves on personal service and the freshness and quality of our food. Daily deliveries of fresh and organic produce allow our team of chefs to prepare a varied daily selection of excellent food at very modest prices.

    We hope to welcome you personally in the near future and promise to make your time with us truly memorable.




    Click here to download a brochure in PDF Format

    Kind regards,

    David and Stephanie
    Proprietors

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    Couple of photographs here which I took of the Conwyy Falls near to Betws Y Coed.




    We were actually overlooking this particular section of The Falls from a road bridge down a country road, the roar of the water as we passed drew our attention to the same, or we would have missed them.

    There's a bit to be said for the advantages of driving with your windows open at times.



    As you can see they were runnig at quite a rate of knots.

    The water was very rusty looking, I put this down to iron deposits in the area?




    We got some decent photographs from both sides of thje bridge.



    Looking at the photographs, it was a good reminder of the force of the water running through this Glen.



    It's quite amazing how the trees grow all around the sides of the Glen as well.



    No shortage of water, that's for sure.



    Bit from the net as well, all very interesting.

    Conwy Falls


    Conwy Falls

    Dramatic waterfalls, located at the confluence of the rivers Conwy and Machno, tumble through a wooded gorge. There are woodland walks where you can enjoy a wealth of wildlife, and a Fish Pass to aid the migration of salmon and sea trout upstream to their breeding grounds. The remains of the old Victorian salmon ladder can also be seen. Café and restaurant.
    Opening Times

    Open daily all year.
    (2006 times)
    Admission

    Small admission charge.
    (2006 prices)
    Contact Information

    Address:
    Betws-y-Coed, Conwy, LL24 0PB
    Telephone:
    01690 710696
    E-mail:
    e-mail attraction
    Website:
    view attraction website
    Facilities

    Toilets:
    Toilets at the Conwy Falls café.
    Eating:
    Café and restaurant on site.
    Location/Travel

    Parking:
    Large car park.
    Public transport:
    Train : nearest station Betws-y-Coed approx. 2 miles.




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    This photograph just about shows the Chainbridge Hotel, unfortunately the suspension bridge across River Dee was marked up 'Closed' Various repairs needed to be carried out to the same, and they are not allowed to use electric flex, like you see in Thailand.




    In case anyone missed the last post on this hotel and the spectacular surroundings, this is a quick photograph from the net.

    Showing The hotel from The Bridge or the opposite bank.



    The Hotel overlooks The River Dee, we were informed that the Hotel and surrounding walkways around and about the river bank are illuminated in quite a spectacular manner of an evening.

    The Canal, which begins at The Horseshoe Falls just a short distance away runs along the other side of the Hotel.





    It really was a very unique location for any Hotel.




    The hotel was really attractive inside, nicely decorated, it had one of those really good feelings to it.

    Both myself and Flobo would have no hesitation in booking a room there, probably will in the future.

    I asked one of the staff at reception if I could take a Bar Menu and the same was handed over, it really was an attractive and pleasant place.



    The Menu had quite a good selection as you can see and there was a chalked board additional 'specials menu' with various attractive dishes on the same as well.





    We thought the prices reflected very fair value in view of the location, appearance and standards of the hotel in general.

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    In the distance you can see The famous Pontcysyllte Aqueduct, designed by Thomas Telford.




    It's certainly impressive.





    Dirt cheap to build as well.


    The views from up on top really were spectacular.

    There is a tow path built along one side of the waterway, originally for the horses to tow the barges along the canal.

    There's a safety railing along the side of the tow path, but none is required along the other side.

    I did speak to a lady who was sat up front on one of the boats which had just crossed. She told me she had been absolutely terrified coming across. I suppose from the bow of the boat and looking down, imagination could run riot with your mind.

    She certainly looked very much as if she had been terrified.

    She said she was going for a drink.




    The Pub was very strategically located.





    There was those having a drink after coming across and those having a drink before they went across the opposite way.



    Some of the boats were really attractive looking, complete with small roof gardens.


    Back to The Aqueduct, it really was an impressive piece of design and engineering.




    Whichever way you looked at it.




    This hand was built alongside The canal. I couldn't work out what it was really meant to represent. The only information I have managed to obtain from the Net was a brief mention of the same connected to 'Brickwork'

    Edited by Mathos.





    Maybe the Free Masons are back in town.

    Both Flobo and myself really enjoyed the walk across the same and back. It's one of those things you feel it was nice to accomplish in life and that you were privileged to be aware of the same.

    Thanks to Propagator for that. He gave me the lead on these pages a couple of months or so back

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    Llangollen was a really nice spot as well, the views in general from the aqueduct were great.




    There could well be a budding Ryan Giggs down among those lads.





    Must say, we spoke to quite a few people in the area, mainly residents and they were extremely nice. Very helpful regarding questions and directions I sought, and happy to point out additional aspects of the area.

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    There was a very attractive cottage by the canal I rather thought it was probably an old lock-keepers home from years gone by.

    Very nice.





    One for Propagator if he's looking in, A really nice tree here, but I am unable to put a name to it.



    I can't say I have seen canal barges or boats advertised like this before.




    Happyman is very much well informed with regards to boat residence. It is amazing really that more and more people in The UK are leaving the land to live on boats.

    Why I wonder?

    It can't be to escape mortgages and the credit crunch, some of the boats are quite expensive. Very much top of the range brand spank new from £120,000..00 and much more, depending on what you want.

    There are many at much less money and I dare-say people could sell a reasonable house, pocket profitable cash and still be able to buy a decent second hand house boat for around £25,000..00 have a hundred and fifty grand cash on deposit as well. There were some brand new ones at Skipton for about £50,000..00.


    There are new marinas opening up throughout the country and canals are being well improved and re-used throughout the land. I understand there are more narrow boats in use now, than at the height of the industrial revolution.

    It's quite amazing when you consider how they appeared to be home for old prams and other discarded rubbish for so long.

    I have noticed the canals in general are really becoming very attractive looking. The boats are also very much back in vogue.

    It's not just leisure either, they are a very beautiful home.

    Lets face it, if you don't like the place you are in, or your neighbours, it isn't a big deal to move at all.

    You don't even need to pack a suitcase.

    Just a little from The net, which I thought would be interesting as well.


    57 ft narrow boat GBP 54,950 57' narrow boat completed January 2008. Comes with RCD and full boat safety. Stainless steel water tank, spray foam insulation, 12/240 volt electrics with changeover switch for shore line, Intellig... read moreView full specification and photos

    As new 55' Narrow Boat GBP 60,000 As NEW 55ft Narrowboat fully completed in 2006 to a high standard. The narrow boat was professionally built and fitted by Ledgard Bridge Boats of Mirfield, West Yorkshire. The boat is for sale du... read moreView full specification and photos

    50ft Cruiser GBP 29,950 Camrose II is a 50ft Cruiser, Built in 1988 by Colecraft and fitted out by Colecraft, All Steel 10/6/4, Flat Bottomed, Eberspacher, Central Heated, Dual Fuel Stove, BMC 1.8 engine, 4 cyl, Keel Cooled,... read moreView Great Haywood Boat Sales Gallery

    57'New Narrow Boat GBP 69,000 Full Internal Fit completed August 2008. Please feel free to visit and view. Good Quality Materials used throughout. Liveaboard or Pleasure use. Hull Built in 2006 to Individual Order by V&G Boat ... read moreView full specification and photos

    40 ft Semi Trad. narrowboat GBP 38,500 For sale, lovely 40 ft semi traditional narrowboat, built in 2000. Double berth to the stern, with good size heads and shower, leading to large open plan galley and saloon with multifuel stove, ample... read moreView full specification and photos
    45ft Narrowboat For Sale GBP 25,000 Cruiser style - very good overall condition with an excellent modern interior. A very clean and tidy craft. Volvo Penta 3 cylinder diesel engine. Constructed in 1991 by Ace Cape Boatbuilders. Layou... read more


    I have taken the information below from an article in a Lancashire Life Magazine:-

    Don't Get Carried Away.

    Jonathen Ludford of British waterways, says the state of our canals is a real success story but there are pitfalls to living on the water.

    It may be wonderful in the summer when the sun is glinting off the water, but you also have to remember that you'll be there in the winter - walking down a muddy towpath in the wet and cold with a big bag of shopping, it's not for everyone. You'll also need to secure residential moorings.

    Ivor Caplan of the Residential Boat owners Association added; "It's a great way of living but my advice is to do your homework."

    You can find out more on www.rboa.org.uk

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    Wales really does deserve more visits and we will go back in a about six weeks or so. Castles are a must and the scenery should be fantastic in the Autumn.

    We intend doing a spell around Snowdon as well, hopefully take the train up to the top of the mountain and visit several of the hamlets and superbly beautiful Welsh Villages in that location especially.

    Depending on how we are placed for time we may even venture into the south. Time will tell.

    I'll transfer these last posts over to The North Wales thread.

    A couple here to conclude the same though.

    I had gone through the briars and the brambles by the rivers to get some of these photographs, it was good fun.



    The river here was heading towards some early rapids, before the actual fall.



    Above as well, it looked very impressive.

    On a sad note though, I was talking to a guy about the waterfalls here a few days since and he mentioned young child losing his life here about a year ago.

    I checked it out and it was true.







    I had got rather close to the rivers in general myself, in all honesty, you would not stand an earthly chance of getting out of those waters alive if they were flowing with the force we witnessed a couple of weeks or so back.

    The power was amazing.



    It's quite amazing to see the power water has in such conditions.



    You have to respect such power.


    Nice photographs of The Snowdon area here superb.




    We are indeed very fortunate to have such beauty in The UK.



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    Good thread thanks.
    Job creation idea wouldn`t work. The heritage mob would want to see proof you were a bone-fidi druid related to Merlin,might be a few about i suppose

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    Quote Originally Posted by sunderlandstephen View Post
    Good thread thanks.
    Job creation idea wouldn`t work. The heritage mob would want to see proof you were a bone-fidi druid related to Merlin,might be a few about i suppose


    Thanks Stephen, you could be right on the proof of Merlin kinship, I wonder Max Boyce would put a word in?



    THE INCREDIBLE PLAN
    by
    Max Boyce


    There's a story told in the valleys
    And I'll tell it as best as I can
    The story of one William McGonegal Morgan
    And of his incredible plan.

    It all started off on a cold winter's night
    A night that was strangely, so still
    When the rugby club's general commitee
    Banned 'Sine-Die' their ticket sec... Will.

    He was in the wrong, we knew all along
    There was no point in petitions and pickets
    He was caught with this woman at the back of the stands
    With the club's allocation of tickets

    What made it worse... she wasn't the first
    He'd been caught with Ben Water's wife, Ethel
    We all knew her with her fox and her fur
    She wore it on Sundays to Bethel.

    Will was sine-died, he broke down and cried
    I've never seen a man in such sorrow
    'Cos like Judas of old, he'd sold more than gold
    With a Scotland and Wales game tomorrow.

    Then he had this idea... he'd go in disguise
    He had it all drawn up and planned
    And he went to the game, to his family's shame
    As one of the St. Alban's Band.

    Back in the village, they all got to know
    'Make one for me, will you?' they'd say
    They'd ask, 'Any chance, for one against France?'
    And fair play, like... what could he say?

    But the man's very able, I think he's in 'Table' (Roundtable?)
    He was working all hours, fair play!
    He gave of his best, he was down to his vest
    Making about fifty a day.

    But Will's getting on and his best days are gone
    'Well, my lad... I'm sad.' he'd say
    'Will, you're on the floor... you can't do no more'
    And he'd say, 'Where there's a Will there's a way!'

    So he put an ad. in 'The Guardian'
    To employ a few men starting Monday
    And he started some men, I think about ten
    Three shifts and some working Sunday.

    They made about three or four hundred
    When the night shift was sent 'two 'til ten'
    The jigs were all changed and the tools rearranged
    And they started on ambulance men.

    Then they ran out of buttons and bandage
    And policemen were next on the plans
    While 'B' shift made refs. with dark glasses
    Alsatians, white sticks and tin cans.

    Then production was brought to a standstill
    And the union could quite understand
    When management tabled the motion
    How things were a bit out of hand!

    I'll never forget the day of the match
    The likes of I'll ne'er see again
    I can see them all, still... coming over the hill
    Hundreds and thousands of men.

    The refs. came in four double deckers
    It was going exactly to plan
    And the St. Albans Band came in lorries
    And the police in a Griff Fender van!

    I'll never forget the day of the match
    The likes of I'll ne'er see again
    When Queen Street was full of alsatians
    And the pubs full of ambulance men.

    It was then I saw Will for the first time
    I was standing on the steps by 'The Grand'
    He was in a camel-hair coat... dressed up as a goat
    Marching in front of the band.

    It was then that the accident happened!
    The roads were all slippy and wet
    He was struck by a man in a greengrocer's van
    And they took him to Davies... the vet.

    Now Davies the vet's a bit short sighted
    He said, 'I'm afraid it's his heart...
    But he wouldn't have lived longer, if he'd been stronger
    His eyes are too far apart.

    The funeral was held on a Monday
    The biggest I'd ever seen
    The wreaths came in four double deckers
    There was one from Prince Charles and The Queen.
    (Sorry!... 'The Price of Wales' and 'The Queens')

    There were sprays there from three thousand policemen
    And one from the St. Albans Band
    And the bearers were refs. with alsations
    Dark glasses, white sticks and tin cans.

    We sang at the graveside, the old funeral hymns
    And we all went to comfort his son
    What made him sad, he said, was his Dad
    Had died, not knowing we'd won.

    I couldn't sleep for most of that night
    I kept thinking of what he had said
    Dad had died... not knowing we'd won
    So I dressed when I got out of bed.

    And I walked again to that hillside
    To that last resting place on the hill
    It was all quiet, save... when I leaned over the grave
    And I shouted, 'WE 'AMMERED THEM, WILL!'

    And that story is told in the valleys
    And I've told it as best as I can
    The legend of William McGonegal Morgan
    And of his Incredible Plan.

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    This post is also shown on The Beautiful Lancashire thread

    Hard to believe some nine months have
    passed since we last visited North Wales.


    Great day here:-

    Sun shining all day, temperature perfect, we decided this morning to have a drive into North Wales.



    We were out for about ten hours. Drove three hundred miles as well.

    Splendid countryside and much more besides.




    The Green Green Grass of Home.



    Llanasa Village

    A really gorgeous little village which we were told
    is quite a winner in The Best Village Award.

    You could tell it was a worthy winner too.

    Not placing much on line tonight, too tired now.


    Then again when places look as perfect as this.



    You don't need to say a great deal at all.




    Even the Village Duck Ponds look spectacular.

    We enjoyed every minute.


    And the Castle:-




    Well Caernarfon Castle is one hell of a fantastic place, steeped in amazing history.

    More later in the week.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mathos
    wonder Max Boyce would put a word in?

    Hi Mathos I always thought that Max Boyce (to quote a real comedian Bernard Manning. )

    was as "funny as Woodworm in a cripples crutch"

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    You two certainly get around!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by TSR2 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Mathos
    wonder Max Boyce would put a word in?

    Hi Mathos I always thought that Max Boyce (to quote a real comedian Bernard Manning. )

    was as "funny as Woodworm in a cripples crutch"

    You made me laugh with that post TSR2.

    Bernard was like that:- Fast one liners and he was bloody funny.


    RIP Bernard.


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    Quote Originally Posted by patsycat View Post
    You two certainly get around!!

    Well you need to be prepared to do it Patsycat.

    It's not that long since we were living for weeks at a time in the mountains of Thailand, Burma, Laos and Cambodia.


    Nothing ventured, nothing gained.


    We were in a really nice part of North Wales yesterday.

    Gronant.



    When I was a kid, I used to cycle there from Manchester.

    They were great days.



    Different here as well, just down the road from Gronant, (maybe I should say up the road) it was in a northerly direction.

    Talacre.

    The Light-House was the first real one I ever saw in my life.

    I think I was about ten years old at the time.

    Seems like yesterday.

    How time passes.




    This is from high on the tops overlooking Talacre, Gronant and Prestatyn.

    Again, brilliant memories.

    There's a prehistoric cairn mound on the top of Y Gop.

    Interesting.

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    There are some absolutely brilliant country lanes up in the hills especially.




    It's a privilege to drive along them.




    They really are special.

    The cairn mound on the top of Y Gop is the biggest in Wales.

    I did take a photograph, but it hasn't turned out for some reason or another.

    Might be due to the ancient spirits of the dead or even as legend has it "The Burial Site of Queen Boadicea."

    Who really knows about these things in life.

    It's mind blowing that we are here at all.

    The rest, true or not is a bonus to our existence, surely.


    The village Gwaenysgor a small and picturesque type of settlement situated 650 feet above sea level at the top of Prestatyn Mountain.

    The public house I placed on the thread recently was The Eagle and Child.




    Flobo took some photographs of the surroundings, they turned out brilliantly.



    Superb archway leading into the gardens.



    Really nice and pleasant 'Court Yard' area.

    The gardens themselves, although petite.




    Rather special, don't you think.



    A little of Llanasa village life here.





    Again, a beautiful scene.



    This as well.



    The word beautiful doesn't do it justice.

    Spectacular and then some more.

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    hello,

    I had never seen this type of scenery, photos are awesome and information is plenty for the tourist to see the beauty of the north-wales. It is one of the wonder place for the tourist to attract, the bridge which was constructed in the middle of River is so wonder and its look beauty . It's place for adventures spot for the tourist.

    With Regards,
    johnsmith

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    Quote Originally Posted by johnsmith9 View Post
    hello,

    I had never seen this type of scenery, photos are awesome and information is plenty for the tourist to see the beauty of the north-wales. It is one of the wonder place for the tourist to attract, the bridge which was constructed in the middle of River is so wonder and its look beauty . It's place for adventures spot for the tourist.

    With Regards,
    johnsmith

    Cheers John

    Wales is another beautiful part of The UK, some exceptionally nice scenery.





    I thought the houses atop the hill here, were very appealing.

    They are certainly blessed with spectacular views
    across the bay and ocean in front of them.



    With my weekly travels and writing on the same, I have neglected the Wales as well as The Highlands of Scotland threads.

    However, if we get a long winter and
    I'm stuck for something to do (which I honestly hope not to be)
    I can always fetch the threads up to date.

    A lot more to do on Asia as well.




    The Penmaenbach Tunnels (you can only see one of them here) pass under the mountains on the coast road down toward Caernarfon.

    Nice job as well.




    Caernarfon Castle.

    Spectacular.

    A masterpiece.





    There are few places in the world which are able to show such buildings.



    I took a few photographs from high up on the battlements.

    The one above looks out across The Menai Straits towards Anglesey.




    You can sense the strength in the walls.



    Spectacular tiny streets inside the original castle walls.

    It really is an eye opener viewing the same first hand.



    Special place indeed.


    Mind you.



    I wouldn't personally like to be living below the quarry here.

    Seem kind of dodgy to me.






    Awesome building and grounds.




    Looking inland towards the mountains.



    I took most of the photographs from the highest turret in the castle.

    Some climb up it was too.

    Really narrow winding steps.

    Well worth it though.



    More of the mountains.

    Outstanding beauty.




    A beautiful country.

    We are indeed very fortunate to have so much variety of special interest
    in such small but very special Islands.

    {Caernarfon or Caernarvon optional, either being acceptable}

  25. #25
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    Most on Teak Door are aware that I normally
    have a run out with Flobo on a Tuesday
    especially, then I write up on the various threads,
    especially Beautiful Lancashire.


    We rarely make concrete plans as to which
    direction we are going, but last night we spoke
    of going toward Pateley Bridge, maybe having a
    look at How Stean Gorge both in the Nidderdale
    area of Yorkshire.


    So after breakfast, whilst Flobo was making
    the bed and putting her make up on etc I fed the fish,
    loaded her bird stations and filled the car up with fuel.


    It was a beautiful morning.




    I kind of thought it would be nice to take a drive into Wales.





    I swear that Seagull reads my mind,
    whenever I make my way to a coastal resort,
    he's always there.





    Sat in a cheeky manner.

    I made it!.



    There are some extremely beautiful places in North Wales.


    Scenes like the above taken from atop The Great Orme are
    difficult to compete with.



    This one too.




    Days like this coupled with scenes of this nature
    add to the beauty of simply being here.

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