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  1. #1
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    TD's Cow Tipping Competition

    TD's Cow Tipping Competition

    Cow tipping is supposedly a major after drinking sport in hick states such as Texas and Arkansas.
    It involves the dangerous act of pushing over sleeping cows.

    How to go Cow Tipping | eHow.com

    Step 1 Choose a pasture; a dairy cow pasture is best, because those cows will let you get the closest to them. During the day, choose your entry point into the pasture. This will be a place you can make a quick getaway without being seen. You’ll most likely want to choose a gate or wooden fence to climb over. Otherwise, your wire cutters will come in handy for cutting through a wire fence. (Don’t touch or cut the fence if it is buzzing! That’s an electric fence.)

    Step 2 Return with your friends after dark. If you have to drive to this location, park your vehicle in a position that will optimize a quick getaway. (Wear dark clothing if you want to be extra stealthy.)

    Step 3 Weave your way through the cow pasture to the nearest unsuspecting and isolated cow by travelling downwind. Don’t walk upright, either; stay hunkered down. This way, the cows won’t see you and the farmer’s bullets are more likely to miss you, should you get caught. Stepping in cow patties is expected, but be careful not to fall into them!

    Step 4 Beam the flashlight quickly into the cow’s eyes; if she doesn’t react, it means she’s sleeping. If she does react, find another cow. (I say "she" because you don't want to be anywhere near a bull. Remember: If there’s an udder, no need to shudder. If it’s a steer, you better stay clear. Also stay away from mama cows who have their babies close by.)

    Step 5 Time to tip the cow. Creep towards it and then have everyone place both of their hands against one side. Count to three, and push the cow in one hard but steady stroke.

    Step 6 Now RUN! It might be hard to run while you’re giggling and avoiding cow pies, but you and your friends will want to fall back to a safer place so that the cranky cow (or the crabby farmer) won’t know where to look for you.

    Step 7 If you feel the burning desire to tip some more cows, go back to Step 3 and repeat- until you’ve either tired yourself out or you’ve started a stampede that’s sure to wake the farmer (which is also part of the fun).

    Step 8 When bragging about this experience later to other friends, be sure to embellish. Include the part about the cows’ “glowing, blood red eyes” and how you outran a six foot bull that chased you all over the pasture. This is an integral part of cow-tipping, since it’s a bold thing to do in the first place.

  2. #2
    watterinja
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    You know, of course, that if the cow is pushed over onto her back & becomes stuck in that position, for any reason, that she'll bloat quickly & die a most horrible death.

  3. #3
    Banned Muadib's Avatar
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    Cow tipping is the path to spiritual enlightenment... Along with 4 peyote buttons and 1/2 fifth of tequila...

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by watterinja
    You know, of course, that if the cow is pushed over onto her back & becomes stuck in that position, for any reason, that she'll bloat quickly & die a most horrible death.
    sounds like bollocks to me, got any evidence?

  5. #5
    watterinja
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    Yes, a scar on my left arm.

    Came outside of an evening on my dairy farm, & found a cow had rolled over onto a fence & could not right herself. She was bloating quickly. A few calls to farmer friends warned me of the bloating issue. Went outside, cut the fence, & pushed the cow over such that he could right herself.

    This she did, with a huge belch, front & rear. She was ok... Oh , the arm thing? Well, in righting her, she kicked my left arm & left a 2" gash. Fixed that with antibiotic powder - left a white scar...
    Last edited by watterinja; 08-08-2009 at 10:53 AM.

  6. #6
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    Urban Myth.

    Just because the cow had rolled over and had bloating at the same time does not mean that the rolling caused the bloating.

    Bloat in Cattle
    Introduction

    This publication provides information on the causes, control, and treatment of bloat in cattle and is intended for livestock producers, veterinarians, and agrologists. The authors have observed bloat produced under experimental conditions by feeding fresh alfalfa and bloat-causing feedlot diets. Bloat has also been observed under grazing conditions on alfalfa pastures.
    Although the information in this publication is oriented around livestock production in western Canada, the general principles are widely applicable, and the publication should provide valuable information for other regions.

    Bloat is a complex disease that is difficult to predict under field conditions. As a result, field observations have led to varied and conflicting theories about its causes. This publication presents well-established facts and consistent field observations based on collective experience. Recommendations are made on this basis and on research reports, general observations, and on the experience of cattle producers.

    nothing about being tipped over in this article.

  7. #7
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    What causes bloat in cattle?
    Bloat in cattle is caused by feeds and diets that provide too much fine particle matter in the rumen, in combination with a supply of readily digestible nutrients that support rapid fermentation. Frothy bloat in cattle is also associated with a slow rate of clearance from the rumen in both feedlot and pasture diets.

  8. #8
    watterinja
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    KW, have you ever run a dairy farm?

    When a cow is on her back, she will die... no two ways about it. Sorry to blow you & your nice story down, but it's crapola...

    Feed-related bloat is an entirely different matter.

  9. #9
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    perhaps you missed this bit?

    Quote Originally Posted by kingwilly
    Bloat is a complex disease that is difficult to predict under field conditions. As a result, field observations have led to varied and conflicting theories about its causes.

    This publication presents well-established facts and consistent field observations based on collective experience. Recommendations are made on this basis and on research reports, general observations, and on the experience of cattle producers.
    it aint a story of mine, its a well researched article or is your PhD in fluid mechanics appliciable to ruminant digestion also?

  10. #10
    watterinja
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    As you will... Seems like the internet article has convinced you. Who am I to bother to convince you otherwise...

    ... please don't run a dairy farm. lol...

  11. #11
    Gohills flip-flops wearer
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    This is a truly wonderous sport. Around these here parts, the locals have taken away the thrill of the chase by the cunning use of a piece of string attaching the uddered one to a tree.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by watterinja View Post
    As you will... Seems like the internet article has convinced you. Who am I to bother to convince you otherwise...

    ... please don't run a dairy farm. lol...
    Is there inherently something wrong with an internet article Diaw? One that has been produced by a agricultrual government department ? which also has multiple references at the end of it

    References

    Cheng, K-J., McAllister, T.A., Popp, J.D., Hristov, A., Mir, Z. and Shin, H.T., 1998. A review of bloat in feedlot cattle. Journal of Animal Science 76:299-308.

    Hall, J.W., Cheeke, P.R., Majak, W 1989. Plant and animal factors in legume bloat. Pages 93-106 in Cheeke, PR., ed. Toxicants of plant origin. Vol. III, Proteins and amino acids. CRC Press,
    Boca Raton, Fla.

    Hironaka, R., Sonntag, B.H. 1980. Feedlot finishing of cattle. Agric. Can. Publ. 1591. 30 pp.

    Howarth, R.E., Cheng, K-J., Majak, W, Costerton, J.W 1986. Ruminant bloat. Pages 516-527 in Milligan, L.R; Grovum, W.L.; Dobson A., eds. Digestion and metabolism in ruminants.
    Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, N.J.

    Majak, W., Garland, G.J., Lysyk, T.J. 2008. The effect of feeding hay before fresh alfalfa on the occurrence of frothy bloat in cattle. Can. J. Anim. Sci. 88:1-3.

    Majak, W., Hall, J.W., McAllister, T.A. 2001. Practical measures for reducing the risk of alfalfa bloat in cattle. J. Range Manage. 54: 490-493.

    Majak, W., Hall, J.W., McCaughey, W.P. 1995. Pasture management systems for reducing the risk of legume bloat in cattle. J. Anim. Sci. 73: 1493-1498.

    Majak, W., Lysyk, T.J., Garland, G.J., Olsen, M.E. 2005. Efficacy of Alfasure for the prevention and treatment of alfalfa bloat in cattle. Can. J. Anim. Sci. 85:111-113.
    and also acknowledges other sources as well....

    Acknowledgments

    The authors acknowledge with thanks the research input and technical assistance of the following people, whose work was used in the preparation of this publication:

    L.R. Barberi, K.D. Jakober, F. Van Herk, Y. Wang - Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Lethbridge Research Centre

    B.P. Berg, Alberta Agriculture, Food and Rural Development - Lethbridge Research Centre

    M. Bradford, B. Brooke, D. Eustache, G. Garland, D. Thompson, I. Walker - Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Kamloops Research Unit
    and has been prepared and written by several named authors who probably do know something about the topic...

    Prepared by:
    W. Majak
    Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Kamloops, BC

    T. A. McAllister
    Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Lethbridge, AB

    D. McCartney
    Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Lacombe, AB

    K. Stanford
    Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development, Lethbridge, AB

    K-J Cheng
    University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC

    or should I just take your word and alleged IQ of 160 for it ? Afterall, you did mention your 'diary farmer friends' as a source.

  13. #13
    Pronce. PH said so AGAIN!
    slackula's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Muadib
    1/2 fifth of tequila...
    So that would be a tenth then..

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by withnallstoke View Post
    This is a truly wonderous sport. Around these here parts, the locals have taken away the thrill of the chase by the cunning use of a piece of string attaching the uddered one to a tree.

    Sounds like more than cow tipping going on there.

  15. #15
    Eric
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    Quote Originally Posted by kingwilly View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by watterinja
    You know, of course, that if the cow is pushed over onto her back & becomes stuck in that position, for any reason, that she'll bloat quickly & die a most horrible death.
    sounds like bollocks to me, got any evidence?
    Slow day today?

  16. #16
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    I was talking to someone about this, regarding it as an internet legend. Not so, apparently it's a major sport in a certain northern english town with a crap football team.

  17. #17
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    How is a cow gonna balance on it's back? I'm trying to imagine it, but the can't see how a cow will lie there with 4 legs in the air. Much more likely to roll to either side.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by 9999 View Post
    How is a cow gonna balance on it's back? I'm trying to imagine it, but the can't see how a cow will lie there with 4 legs in the air. Much more likely to roll to either side.
    A dead cow might.

  19. #19
    Eric
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    Quote Originally Posted by Begbie View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by 9999 View Post
    How is a cow gonna balance on it's back? I'm trying to imagine it, but the can't see how a cow will lie there with 4 legs in the air. Much more likely to roll to either side.
    A dead cow might.
    I still reckon gravity and other factors would ensure the cow rolls over on it's side

    I looked at some examples and could only find two feet in the air

    1).


  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Begbie View Post
    I was talking to someone about this, regarding it as an internet legend. Not so, apparently it's a major sport in a certain northern english town with a crap football team.

    fark, Liverpool, Manchester, Newcastle, Sunderland, Hull....the list goes on and on

  21. #21
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    I can assure you that when I was a kid, cow-tipping was alive and well in the US... Along with snipe hunting and doing the horizontal mambo in the back seat of the dad's Cadilac...

    Not so sure anymore with the generation XYZ punks with metal in their face, an iPod in their ear and texting as fast as they can on their cell... They probably don't know WTF a cow looks like, unless it's on a billboard with a cute caption, like 'Eat mo Chiken'...
    Give a man a match, and he'll be warm for a minute, but set him on fire, and he'll be warm for the rest of his life.

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