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  1. #1
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    Scotsmen weep in their whisky

    It enough to make a scotsman cry in his whisky.

    It was discovered that the Greeks invented the bagpipes. Then to follow that the Irish claim that the kilt came from them and the tartan could have originated in China. The Loch Ness monster is a myth, and now finding that the Haggis came from England. Oh the shame of it.....


    If you're a Scot, look away now... haggis was invented by the English


    By Andrew Tolmie and Beth Hale
    Last updated at 3:11 PM on 04th August 2009





    For centuries it has been a symbol of Scotland alongside tartan, bagpipes and whisky.
    But haggis is actually an English creation, a food historian has discovered.
    The claim has sparked a fierce backlash from proud Scots who eat the dish every January to celebrate the poet Robert Burns, who wrote in praise of 'the great chieftain of the puddin' race'.
    Food historian Catherine Brown has found mentions of haggis in an English cooking guide from 1615 which proves it was being eaten south of the border some 171 years before Robert Burns wrote his Address to the Haggis.


    Delicacy: Scottish workers at MacSween's prepare haggis, which food historian Catherine Brown has found was in fact invented in England


    The writer, herself a Scot, found a reference to the 'delicacy' in the 17th century book 'The English Hus-wife', by Gervase Markham.
    It says 'small oat meal mixed with the blood, and the liver of either sheep, calfe, or swine, maketh that pudding which is called the Haggas, or Haggus of whose goodnesse it is vain to boast, because there is hardly to be found a man that doth not affect (like) them.'

    Enlarge


    Miss Brown said the earliest reference to a Scottish haggis she could find was from 1747 - pointing to the likelihood that the recipe had been copied from English sources.




    More...



    By the late 18th century haggis was firmly a Scottish dish. Miss Brown believes nationalists claimed it as a symbol of Scotland after the country lost its own monarchy and parliament in the 1706 Treaty of Union.
    Burns honoured it in his famous poem of 1786 as a way to undermine the pretentious French cuisine in Edinburgh at the time.
    Proud tradition: Scots eat haggis every January to celebrate poet Robert Burns

    Miss Brown added: 'It seems to be that there's an identity thing there. We'd lost our monarchy, we'd lost our parliament and we gained our haggis.'
    Not surprisingly, her claims have been dismissed by Scots. Ian Scott, a member of the Saltire Society, suggested haggis was a Scottish invention introduced into England by a Scot.
    He said: 'I can just imagine a backpacker on his way south maybe having a picnic and leaving a bit behind, and someone saying we've discovered something fantastically new.'

    Mr Scott added: 'I love haggis and every January I eat it about 11 times. These claims won't make me feel any different.
    'I would tuck into it with even greater gusto if I thought that it had been invented by the English. I mean, they are bound to have invented something worthwhile.'
    James Macsween, director of award-winning Edinburgh haggis-maker Macsween's, said it will remain a Scottish icon whatever its origin.
    He added: 'Haggis is now renowned as Scotland's dish largely due to Robert Burns, who made it famous.
    'That's not to say that, prior to Burns, haggis wasn't eaten in England, but Scotland has done a better job of looking after it.
    'I didn't hear of Shakespeare writing a poem about haggis.'

    &nbsp


    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/food/article-1203863/If-youre-Scot-look-away--haggis-invented-English.html#ixzz0NERmSeIM



    Another wee dram needed

  2. #2
    たのむよ。
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    Tikka Masala was invented in Scotland so it's not all bad.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Gentleman Scamp
    Tikka Masala was invented in Scotland so it's not all bad.
    Maybe so, but still 'hotly' disputed

  4. #4
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    I wish Tud was still here.

  5. #5
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    The English Haggis was made with liver.

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    Tired is the day where grown men whine on endlessly about the origin of their birth.
    Tiresome to the nth degree.

    Only dumb kunts need apply. Take a hike dumb bastards. Yeah, that includes 90 percent of TD losers. Most of 'em Brittle, fragile cunts. Not a shred to be proud of. Nothing but shame.

    Spread the insignificance around. Sad leathery kunts. Still, Insignificant.

    Sorry. You lose again.

  7. #7
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    Nice to see you posting again Tex

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    And with his usual, cheerful glee!!!

    As for the OP, the Scots still have Scotch whiskey and granite to be proud of...

  9. #9
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    They won't be crying into this one


    Kilmarnock is part of the blend!

    Without Kilmarnock, Johnnie Walker is just another blend. Without Johnnie Walker, Kilmarnock and Hurlford will spiral into decay.

    According to Diageo official statistics, Johnnie Walker Scotch Whisky sold 16.2 million 9-litre equivalent cases in 2008 - making it the worlds number one Scotch whisky. The whisky has come from Kilmarnock since 1820 and is an extremely profitable business however London based owners Diageo want to make even more money and are prepared to rip the heart out of the towns in order to achieve this.

    Do not allow Johnnie Walker to leave Kilmarnock and Hurlford. Kilmarnock and Hurlford cannot afford another loss like this!

    Act now to save the towns!

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Texpat View Post
    Tired is the day where grown men whine on endlessly about the origin of their birth.
    Tiresome to the nth degree.

    Only dumb kunts need apply. Take a hike dumb bastards. Yeah, that includes 90 percent of TD losers. Most of 'em Brittle, fragile cunts. Not a shred to be proud of. Nothing but shame.

    Spread the insignificance around. Sad leathery kunts. Still, Insignificant.

    Sorry. You lose again.

    Oh goody, happy go lucky Tex is back!

    Hi mate!

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Muadib View Post
    And with his usual, cheerful glee!!!

    As for the OP, the Scots still have Scotch whiskey and granite to be proud of...
    Whiskey is Irish.

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  13. #13
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    ^^ Scotch Whiskey is Scottish though.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by tjyflhol View Post
    ^^ Scotch Whiskey is Scottish though.
    No such thing, I think you mean Scotch Whisky

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Muadib View Post
    Ahem....

    The link above is talking about whisky not
    Quote Originally Posted by Muadib
    whiskey
    Different things, Whisky is Scottish while Whiskey is Irish

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Texpat View Post
    Tired is the day where grown men whine on endlessly about the origin of their birth.
    Tiresome to the nth degree.

    Only dumb kunts need apply. Take a hike dumb bastards. Yeah, that includes 90 percent of TD losers. Most of 'em Brittle, fragile cunts. Not a shred to be proud of. Nothing but shame.

    Spread the insignificance around. Sad leathery kunts. Still, Insignificant.

    Sorry. You lose again.
    Awww, poor Tex. Still bitter about something or other? No need to be sorry....

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrB0b View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by tjyflhol View Post
    ^^ Scotch Whiskey is Scottish though.
    No such thing, I think you mean Scotch Whisky
    Well whatever the nice tasting whisky is called anyway.

  18. #18
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    Lets turn the screw a little more,

    History of Whisky
    Though the exact origin of whiskey is not known, it is estimated that the knowledge of distilling was discovered in Asia, somewhere around 800 BC. During the initial phases, the distillation process was used to make perfumes only. With time, the Chinese started distilling liquor from rice. As time progressed, the knowledge of distillation traveled across to the British Isles. Though it is not known exactly how this took place, there is evidence that the Moors were responsible for the same.

    The most common explanation is that Patrick, the Patron Saint of Ireland, brought the knowledge to Ireland, where he went there as a Christian Missionary, in 432 AD. Celts used the distillation process to make their Uisge Beatha (Gaelic for ‘water of life’). In fact, the name ‘whisky’ emerged from the word ‘Uisge’ only. One of the first written records, related to the beverage, dates back to the year 1494. The Exchequer Rolls of Scotland, of that year, show a purchase of “eight bolls of malt to Friar John Cor wherewith to make aqua vitae”.


    I would presume that only a whisky brewed and distilled in Scotland, using Scottish water could qualify as a 'Scotch' whisky.

  19. #19
    Banned Muadib's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrB0b View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Muadib View Post
    Ahem....

    The link above is talking about whisky not
    Quote Originally Posted by Muadib
    whiskey
    Different things, Whisky is Scottish while Whiskey is Irish
    I stand corrected...

  20. #20
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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Propagator View Post
    Lets turn the screw a little more,

    History of Whisky
    Though the exact origin of whiskey is not known, it is estimated that the knowledge of distilling was discovered in Asia, somewhere around 800 BC. During the initial phases, the distillation process was used to make perfumes only. With time, the Chinese started distilling liquor from rice. As time progressed, the knowledge of distillation traveled across to the British Isles. Though it is not known exactly how this took place, there is evidence that the Moors were responsible for the same.

    The most common explanation is that Patrick, the Patron Saint of Ireland, brought the knowledge to Ireland, where he went there as a Christian Missionary, in 432 AD. Celts used the distillation process to make their Uisge Beatha (Gaelic for ‘water of life’). In fact, the name ‘whisky’ emerged from the word ‘Uisge’ only. One of the first written records, related to the beverage, dates back to the year 1494. The Exchequer Rolls of Scotland, of that year, show a purchase of “eight bolls of malt to Friar John Cor wherewith to make aqua vitae”.


    I would presume that only a whisky brewed and distilled in Scotland, using Scottish water could qualify as a 'Scotch' whisky.
    Of course it is but you're missing the point here, nobody's talking about the origin of the drink (everybody knows it was invented by Arabs ). The point is in the spelling - Whisky (no letter e) is Scotch, Whiskey (with letter e) is Irish.

  22. #22
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    It's nice to see the Irish have some culture to hold on to.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Propagator View Post
    Delicacy: Scottish workers at MacSween's prepare haggis, which food historian Catherine Brown has found was in fact invented in England

    The writer, herself a Scot, found a reference to the 'delicacy' in the 17th century book 'The English Hus-wife', by Gervase Markham.

    Miss Brown said the earliest reference to a Scottish haggis she could find was from 1747 - pointing to the likelihood that the recipe had been copied from English sources.
    Well, just coz it wasn't recorded in writing before the English, don't mean the Scots weren't making it first. English probably stole the recipe.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrB0b
    The point is in the spelling - Whisky (no letter e) is Scotch, Whiskey (with letter e) is Irish.
    Thanks - didn't know that.

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    How come Canucks do rye whisky?

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