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  1. #1
    Member jimmie2549's Avatar
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    Is illiteracy the same as stupidity ?

    just a question !!

    I come from Denmark,that mean i'm not native english speaking
    been regular in Thailand last 7yrs, last five with rented house... ...
    we use alot english in denmark by conversation
    not by write it..
    I just moved from Chiang Mai to Korat.. new area new dialect..
    my Thai is very okay, also I begin to spell/read in thai...

    TD is in English,perfect, because everybody have a chance to join...
    but sometime when a non-native (in this case ME) want to make a thread
    or want to reply on one, we do it with our emotions/curiosity. We(again me) also want to be polite and response fast...

    So sometime it happen a spell-mistake is not even illiteracy, just a polite mistake..
    just want to tell
    Mad Dane

  2. #2
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    They are not the same Jimmie. Just don't try any rope and pullage in Thailand. The authorities take a dim view of that.

  3. #3
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    No they're not. I'm pretty literate, yet unimaginably stupid. Sad innit.

  4. #4
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    OK. Think of it this way.

    You have a Danish forum where everyone is fluent(ish) in Danish and then along comes someone who posts such gibberish that you can only scratch your head and wonder what the hell that person is trying to say.

    Yes, you do have the excuse of being Danish (unlike Rubberjohnny), but I suggest you slow down a wee bit and read what you have written twice before posting.

    Alternatively, give it back to me, Big Boy!

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marmite the Dog
    Alternatively, give it to me, Big Boy!
    did they mention that TD is also

  6. #6
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    Is illiteracy the same as stupidity ?

    No Jimmy it is not, you can be illiterate and still be very intelligent, literacy is a learned thing and being intelligent is something you just have to be, it can not be learned.

    Check out a poster named Panama Hat, he is a long way from illiterate.

  7. #7
    Member jimmie2549's Avatar
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    thankzzz...hehe Marmers now "we talk the same language"
    one liiiiittle thing I not mention about spell wrong: the Beer influence...

    cheers

  8. #8
    The cold, wet one
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    Quote Originally Posted by blackgang
    Is illiteracy the same as stupidity ? No Jimmy it is not, you can be illiterate and still be very intelligent, literacy is a learned thing and being intelligent is something you just have to be, it can not be learned.
    Excellent post, BG.

    Literacy is also (as hinted at previously) something which can be dependent on your ability in another language. I'm illiterate in the vast majority of languages in the world, but don't consider myself thick. It's all them other buggers that should learn English and speak and write it like wot I do...

  9. #9
    I don't know barbaro's Avatar
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    Welcome, Jimmie 4385493,

    It's OK if you not speak lot English.

    Welcome to board.


  10. #10
    Member jimmie2549's Avatar
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    I know I threw this ball in the air...BUT the truth is there six kind of intelligence(emotional)

    writing (in this case)
    talk
    matematic (logistic)
    physical "football etc"
    music (art)
    positiv look on your on life..

    And the most clever is the one who have a little bit of each...

    ERVEYOBDY CNA UDNRESTNAD TIHS I JSUT HAEV WORTE ????

  11. #11
    I don't know barbaro's Avatar
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    I've never heard of "physical" intelligenct, Jimmie 5848349495,

    Cheers.


  12. #12
    Member jimmie2549's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Milkman View Post
    I've never heard of "physical" intelligenct, Jimmie 5848349495,

    Cheers.


    AHH Again my fast reponse... physical intelligence is : ronaldo, macig Johnson, wayne gretcky, ME

  13. #13
    I am in Jail

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    ^ Anybody who appreciates Gretz is fine by me!
    Quote Originally Posted by jimmie2549 View Post
    one liiiiittle thing I not mention about spell wrong: the Beer influence...
    Now that's honesty! You're better than some of the so-called native speakers.

    I agree NR, BG put it in a nutshell (too bad you didn't quote his whole post).
    There are many immigrants at the food shops I go to. We don't speak the same lingo, but I've had some good laughs with some, especially the older babushka ladies, while checking over the veg. They may not speak English or Chinese, but they understand the price and sure know the quality.
    As BG said, intelligence is innate, literacy learned by rote.

    And welcome to the board, Jimmie!

  14. #14
    I don't know barbaro's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimmie2549 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Milkman View Post
    I've never heard of "physical" intelligenct, Jimmie 5848349495,

    Cheers.


    AHH Again my fast reponse... physical intelligence is : ronaldo, macig Johnson, wayne gretcky, ME
    They all good. Good player, Jimmie 3458287


  15. #15
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    My dad is Danish and his English is better than mine.

    He ruins it all by wearing wooden clogs though

  16. #16
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    erm, Gardners multiple intelligences. depends who you read, but there is up to 9 so called types of intelligences, and being a human construct, they are also fallible as well.




    Quote Originally Posted by jimmie2549
    BUT the truth is there six kind of intelligence(em

  17. #17
    I am in Jail

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    ^ Give us the dibs, then!

  18. #18
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    In Praise of Elitism
    by James R. Delisle, Ph.D.


    In a recent edition of the Duke Gifted Letter, a publication sponsored by the Talent Identification Program (TIP) at Duke University, I took part in a so-called “Expert’s Forum” about the merits and flaws of the biggest educational misnomer of modern times: the “Theory” of Multiple Intelligences (MI), as proposed by Harvard researcher, Howard Gardner.
    With its egalitarian insistence that nearly everyone is gifted at something, the MI idea has taken the country, and the world, by storm. Why? Because MI artificially distributes giftedness equally among various talent areas—linguistic, mathematical, spatial, and so forth—which is a politically correct but intrinsically incorrect notion of what intelligence is. What a shame . . . what a sham, and I am not afraid to say so:
    As a theory, MI is convenient, simple . . . and wrong. . . . So many people have jumped on to the bandwagon with the idea that “everyone is gifted at something” that many gifted programs have been eliminated or watered down. Some people are under the illusion that the needs of gifted students can be met in a setting that allows multiple forms of expression. MI is a simplistic, wishful-thinking approach that seems like a good thing to people who are uncomfortable admitting that intellectual abilities are not equally distributed in American society. (Delisle, 2000, pp. 2–3)
    Naturally, my comments have been interpreted by some as meaning that I am an “elitist” when it comes to identifying and serving gifted children. For those who level this accusation, I thank you. For if being an elitist means that I still believe in a distinct quality of giftedness that is the domain of the few, not the many; and if being an elitist means that I believe gifted individuals need to be understood as the complex intellectual and emotional beings that they are; and if being an elitist means that I will advocate for a small percentage of children to receive a level of academic rigor and emotional understanding that transcends the typical, then an elitist I shall be. It is a badge I will wear proudly.
    Gardner’s sad and incorrect notion that giftedness is as common a behavior or trait as being able to bowl a game of 100 is based on an incomplete and inaccurate interpretation of the mountains of research that prove otherwise. But, this idea of giftedness as a talent, a “thing,” is not unique to him. Starting in 1978 with the publication of Joseph Renzulli’s article “What makes giftedness?” and concluding (as yet) with Gardner’s latest incantation of a ninth intelligence, the world of giftedness has been upside-down, to the detriment of gifted children. As a fallout of Renzulli’s and Gardner’s work, it is now becoming increasingly popular for educators to scrap intact gifted programs and replace them with enrichment options for all children. This may satisfy school officials, who can now proclaim to parents that “the gifted program benefits everyone,” but this schoolwide enrichment plan generally fails to provide the sustenance necessary to fulfill the complex lives of gifted children.
    The idea of giftedness as being a developmental, lifelong trait that transcends day-to-day achievements has been replaced with Renzulli’s “Type III” projects and Gardner’s ad nauseum intelligences. When this happens, we relegate giftedness to a commodity to be traded and displayed, rather than the unique state of mind and being that it really is. But, in our current era of school accountability, high-stakes testing, and the “win-at-all-costs” approach to education, it is hard to argue against marketplace ethos of multiple intelligences. Too few gifted educators and school administrators discuss the obvious: School programs based on Gardner’s notion of intelligence or Renzulli’s interpretation of giftedness as a product are based more on political expediency than they are on psychological or educational legitimacy. In our rush toward egalitarianism as regards the concept of giftedness, we have lost sight of what should be our primary vision: the gifted child who cries out for attention.
    But, argue we must. For if we don’t, the gifted children who inhabit our homes and our classrooms will become pawns in an educational shell game that tries to hide giftedness by shifting around notions of what intelligence entails. When this happens—“gifted one year, not gifted the next”; “multiply intelligent in math and spatial, but not in verbal or interpersonal”—we dissect the child into a specimen to be examined, rather that an entity to be cherished. Sad to say, but the work of Renzulli, Gardner, and other self-titled “talent development specialists” has tarnished the notion of giftedness more than they have shined it. For in proposing their ideas on all-inclusive giftedness, they have left behind the very children they supposedly endorse: those children who are gifted in the mind and the heart 24–7, whether or not their panache in completing projects or in sharing their multiple intelligences in 5/9 of the possible categories is obvious.
    Elitist? You bet I am, because I believe in the sanctity of human differences and the reality that an IQ of 145 does earmark you as different at age 10 from your fourth-grade classmates in some important, but unseen, ways. Elitist? You bet I am, if it means taking a child aside and emphasizing that giftedness is a lifelong quality that does not go away when the school years end. Elitist? You bet I am, and it has nothing to do with social or economic or racial classes, but instead is simply an indication that abilities—intellectual and emotional—differ among and between people. Always have, always will. Elitist? You bet I am, for if gifted students need a foot soldier to explain to others that they may be as different from average students, academically and emotionally, as are children with mental retardation, then I will be their man.
    Can we as an enterprise—can you, as an individual—give up the notion that “elitism” is a bad word and an evil concept when applied to gifted children and those who care about them? I hope that is possible, for without our active and vocal support, the gifted children we used to identify and serve in special school programs will wither as surely as do fields of grain without water.
    As always, our world and our homes need the richness of spirit and compassion that gifted children provide. To abandon them up in deference to “equity” or “excellence for all” is to make them sacrificial lambs on the altar of egalitarianism. Gifted children deserve better, and who else to champion their cause than a bunch of “elitists” who realize and accentuate an essential truth: Gifted children do exist, as they always have and always will, and to discount their presence and prominence in our society is to be the ultimate intellectual snob who would rather dismiss reality than face it.
    Giftedness exists, and not in equal measure across all people. Isn’t it time to fess-up the errors brought about by the egalitarian illogic of Multiple Intelligences? Isn’t it time to address the inherent inequities brought about by endorsing enrichment for all? Isn’t it time to recapture the field of gifted child education from those who have held it hostage for a generation? Our gifted children deserve to be identified and served in ways that capitalize on their unique abilities and qualities. Please join me in being elitist enough to say so.
    References
    Delisle, J. R. (2000). Expert’s forum. Duke Gifted Letter, 1(1), 2–3.
    Renzulli, J. S. (1978). What makes giftedness?: Reexamining a definition. Phi Delta Kappan, 60, 180–184, 261.

    About the Author
    James R. Delisle, Ph.D., is professor of education at Kent State University in Ohio and a part-time teacher of gifted children in Twinsburg City Schools. He has written When Gifted Kids Don’t Have All the Answers (with Judy Galbraith) and Barefoot Irreverence: A Guide to Critical Issues in Gifted Child Education He may be reached at Kent State University, College of Education, Dean’s Office, P.O. Box 5190, Kent, OH 44242.

    This article originally appeared in Gifted Child Today, 24(1), 14–15. Winter 2001.
    Gifted Child Today grants permission to copy articles and columns for education purposes only. All copies must include author(s)’ name(s) and full reference (Gifted Child Today, volume, issue number, and page numbers), and a copy of the publication in which the reprinted article appears must be sent to Prufrock Press, P.O. Box 8813, Waco, TX, 76714-8813. If more than 50 copies of an article are to be reprinted, written permission must be submitted via fax to (512) 300-2221.

  19. #19
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    The Nine Types of Intelligence

    By Howard Gardner

    1. Naturalist Intelligence (“Nature Smart”)

    Designates the human ability to discriminate among living things (plants, animals) as well as sensitivity to other features of the natural world (clouds, rock configurations). This ability was clearly of value in our evolutionary past as hunters, gatherers, and farmers; it continues to be central in such roles as botanist or chef. It is also speculated that much of our consumer society exploits the naturalist intelligences, which can be mobilized in the discrimination among cars, sneakers, kinds of makeup, and the like.

    2. Musical Intelligence (“Musical Smart”)

    Musical intelligence is the capacity to discern pitch, rhythm, timbre, and tone. This intelligence enables us to recognize, create, reproduce, and reflect on music, as demonstrated by composers, conductors, musicians, vocalist, and sensitive listeners. Interestingly, there is often an affective connection between music and the emotions; and mathematical and musical intelligences may share common thinking processes. Young adults with this kind of intelligence are usually singing or drumming to themselves. They are usually quite aware of sounds others may miss.


    3. Logical-Mathematical Intelligence (Number/Reasoning Smart)

    Logical-mathematical intelligence is the ability to calculate, quantify, consider propositions and hypotheses, and carry out complete mathematical operations. It enables us to perceive relationships and connections and to use abstract, symbolic thought; sequential reasoning skills; and inductive and deductive thinking patterns. Logical intelligence is usually well developed in mathematicians, scientists, and detectives. Young adults with lots of logical intelligence are interested in patterns, categories, and relationships. They are drawn to arithmetic problems, strategy games and experiments.

    4. Existential Intelligence


    Sensitivity and capacity to tackle deep questions about human existence, such as the meaning of life, why do we die, and how did we get here.

    5. Interpersonal Intelligence (People Smart”)

    Interpersonal intelligence is the ability to understand and interact effectively with others. It involves effective verbal and nonverbal communication, the ability to note distinctions among others, sensitivity to the moods and temperaments of others, and the ability to entertain multiple perspectives. Teachers, social workers, actors, and politicians all exhibit interpersonal intelligence. Young adults with this kind of intelligence are leaders among their peers, are good at communicating, and seem to understand others’ feelings and motives.

    6. Bodily-Kinesthetic Intelligence (“Body Smart”)

    Bodily kinesthetic intelligence is the capacity to manipulate objects and use a variety of physical skills. This intelligence also involves a sense of timing and the perfection of skills through mind–body union. Athletes, dancers, surgeons, and craftspeople exhibit well-developed bodily kinesthetic intelligence.

    7. Linguistic Intelligence (Word Smart)

    Linguistic intelligence is the ability to think in words and to use language to express and appreciate complex meanings. Linguistic intelligence allows us to understand the order and meaning of words and to apply meta-linguistic skills to reflect on our use of language. Linguistic intelligence is the most widely shared human competence and is evident in poets, novelists, journalists, and effective public speakers. Young adults with this kind of intelligence enjoy writing, reading, telling stories or doing crossword puzzles.

    8. Intra-personal Intelligence (Self Smart”)

    Intra-personal intelligence is the capacity to understand oneself and one’s thoughts and feelings, and to use such knowledge in planning and directioning one’s life. Intra-personal intelligence involves not only an appreciation of the self, but also of the human condition. It is evident in psychologist, spiritual leaders, and philosophers. These young adults may be shy. They are very aware of their own feelings and are self-motivated.

    9. Spatial Intelligence (“Picture Smart”)

    Spatial intelligence is the ability to think in three dimensions. Core capacities include mental imagery, spatial reasoning, image manipulation, graphic and artistic skills, and an active imagination. Sailors, pilots, sculptors, painters, and architects all exhibit spatial intelligence. Young adults with this kind of intelligence may be fascinated with mazes or jigsaw puzzles, or spend free time drawing or daydreaming.


    From: Overview of the Multiple Intelligences Theory. Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development and Thomas Armstrong.com

  20. #20
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    Why did u ave to ask Jet im all confused now

  21. #21
    I am in Jail

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    ^ Sorry! Don't read post #18, just read 19.

  22. #22
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    Too late i'm puddled.

  23. #23
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    All very well, but this is what happens if you posts gibberish on the forum (unless your name is Kingwilly).

    http://teakdoor.com/moronic-kiddies-...s-to-jail.html

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marmite the Dog View Post
    All very well, but this is what happens if you posts gibberish on the forum (unless your name is Kingwilly).

    http://teakdoor.com/moronic-kiddies-...s-to-jail.html
    This would make Willy a teacher's pet?

  25. #25
    ทำไมคุณแปลนี้
    filch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marmite the Dog
    read what you have written twice before posting.
    Agree with this.

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