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Thread: Trust drug

  1. #1
    The Pikey Hunter
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    Trust drug

    (What could possibly go wrong? )



    Trust drug may cure social phobia


    The discovery could lead to treatments for social phobia


    A nasal spray which increases our trust for strangers is showing promise as a treatment for social phobia, say scientists from Zurich University.
    They found that people who inhaled the "love hormone" oxytocin continued to trust strangers with their money - even after they were betrayed.
    Brain scans showed the hormone lowered activity in the amygdala - a region which is overactive in social phobics.
    Drug trials are under way and early signs are promising say the scientists.
    We hope and indeed we expect that we can improve sociability by administering oxytocin


    Dr Thomas Baumgartner
    Zurich University


    Nicknamed the "cuddle chemical", oxytocin is a naturally produced hormone, which has been shown to play a role in social relations, maternal bonding, and also in sex.
    Lead researcher Dr Thomas Baumgartner said: "We now know for the first time what exactly is going on in the brain when oxytocin increases trust.
    "We found that oxytocin has a very specific effect in social situations. It seems to diminish our fears.
    "Based on our results, we can now conclude that a lack of oxytocin is at least one of the causes for the fear experienced by social phobics.
    "We hope and indeed we expect that we can improve their sociability by administering oxytocin."
    Powerful effect
    Previous studies have shown that participants in "trust games" took greater risks with their money after inhaling the hormone via a nasal spray.
    In this latest experiment, published in the journal Neuron, the researchers asked volunteer subjects to take part in a similar game.
    They were asked to contribute money to a human trustee, with the understanding that the trustee would invest the money and decide whether to return the profits, or betray the subject's trust by keeping the profit.
    The subjects also received doses of oxytocin or a placebo via a nasal spray.
    After investing, the participants were given feedback on the trustees. When their trust was abused, the placebo group became less willing to invest. But the players who had been given oxytocin continued to trust their money with a broker.
    "We can see that oxytocin has a very powerful effect," said Dr Baumgartner.
    "The subjects who received oxytocin demonstrated no change in their trust behaviour, even though they were informed that their trust was not honoured in roughly 50% of cases."
    In a second game, where the human trustees were replaced by a computer which gave random returns, the hormone made no difference to the players' investment behaviour.
    "It appears that oxytocin affects social responses specifically related to trust," Dr Baumgartner said.
    Defence barriers
    During the games, the players' brains were scanned using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI).
    The researchers found that oxytocin reduced activity in two regions which act as natural "defence barriers".
    They are the amygdala, which processes fear and danger, and an area of the striatum, which helps to guide future behaviour, based on reward feedback.
    The amygdala has been found to be extremely active in the brains of sufferers of social phobia.
    Dr Baumgartner's colleague, Professor Markus Heinrichs, has begun a study where social phobia sufferers are given either oxytocin or a placebo, in combination with cognitive and behavioural therapy.
    The trials are ongoing, but Dr Baumgartner said that early signs appear "promising".
    The hormone could also be a candidate for treating patients with autism, he says.
    "Autistic people also have a fear of social situations and have problems interacting, so it is very likely that oxytocin could help," he said.
    "This hormone seems to play a very specific role in social situations so might be able to improve autism. But so far I am not aware of any studies."
    Mauricio Delgado, a psychologist at Rutgers University, said: "This study has significant implications for understanding mental disorders where deficits in social behaviour are observed. "While a degree of wariness may protect one from harm, being able to ''forgive and forget'' is an imperative step in maintaining long-term relationships. "The reported oxytocin finding could provide a bridge for potential clinical applications."
    You, sir, are a God among men....
    Short Men, who aren't terribly bright....
    More like dwarves with learning disabilities....
    You are a God among Dwarves With Learning Disabilities.

  2. #2
    I am in Jail
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    Nah, I prefer oxycontine.

  3. #3
    Rhubarb, rhubarb, rhubarb
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    Saw it on BBC and immediatly thought of Buadhai

  4. #4
    The Pikey Hunter
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    ^ Why, you want to borrow some money from him?

  5. #5
    Thailand Expat
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    sounds like a spoof article to me... onion.com?

  6. #6
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    I bet it'll be popular with Nigerians.

  7. #7
    The Pikey Hunter
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    ^^ BBC old chap. They never lie about anything.
    Last edited by Gerbil; 22-05-2008 at 06:15 PM.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerbil
    continued to trust strangers with their money - even after they were betrayed.
    Soon available over the counter in Pats. Big sales expected in BG market.

  9. #9
    ding ding ding
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    ^ they dont need it they already have their own scented entrapment weapon

  10. #10
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    I need my distrust.

  11. #11
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    Closer reading of the article: Pseudo scientific clap-trap.

    Oh yes, 'Psychologist' and "Am not aware of any studies yet" There we go. Utter nonsense.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael View Post
    Closer reading of the article: Pseudo scientific clap-trap.
    Oh yes, 'Psychologist' and "Am not aware of any studies yet" There we go. Utter nonsense.
    The synthetic form of oxytocin is very real and sold under the trade names Pitocin and Syntocinon to speed up labor during childbirth. The problem is that big pharma may very well use pseudo-scientific claptrap to expand its use for social phobias and eventually other maladies. They've tried this sort of thing before and gotten away with it. Oxytocin sounds like it could be the the closest thing to soma, the drug used to control the public in Aldous Huxley's "Brave New World".

  13. #13
    たのむよ。
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    It could be used for date rape in nightclubs and bars.

    When the girl is not looking a nasty man could put the inhaler up her nose and spray it, then tell her he is a gynacologist and needs to inspect her.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Gentleman Scamp View Post
    It could be used for date rape in nightclubs and bars. When the girl is not looking a nasty man could put the inhaler up her nose and spray it, then tell her he is a gynacologist and needs to inspect her.
    I can actually foresee the nastier sex tourists mixing oxytocin in those menthol inhalers that Thai girls love to snort. A drugged bargirl's trust level in her farang customer would skyrocket from zero to .00001%.

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