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Thread: Happy Xxxmas!

  1. #1
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    Happy Xxxmas!


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    It's Christmas you fool.

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    no its not. Christ wasnt born on 25th of December.

    Xmas is a pagan festival that the Romans assimilated as part of Christianity.

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    So tell me then king willy - what is xmas?

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    i just told u a pagan festival that the romans stole to improve the spread of christianity!

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    so tell me king willy - why is the print on her knickers written in reverse?

  7. #7
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    and actually no need to feel offended by the abbreviation, since it is derived from your Christ anyway

    The word "Christmas" originated as a contraction of "Christ's mass." It is derived from the Middle English Christemasse and Old English Cristes mæsse, a phrase first recorded in 1038.[1] In early Greek versions of the New Testament, the letter Χ (chi), is the first letter of Christ. Since the mid-sixteenth century Χ, or the similar Roman letter X, was used as an abbreviation for Christ.[2] Hence, "Xmas" is often used as an abbreviation for Christmas.
    After the conversion of Anglo-Saxon Britain in the very early 7th century, Christmas was referred to as geol,[1] the name of the pre-Christian solstice festival from which the current English word 'Yule' is derived.[3]
    The prominence of Christmas Day increased gradually after Charlemagne was crowned on Christmas Day in 800. Around the 12th century, the remnants of the former Saturnalian traditions of the Romans were transferred to the Twelve Days of Christmas (26 December – 6 January). Christmas during the Middle Ages was a public festival, incorporating ivy, holly, and other evergreens, as well as gift-giving.

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    here ya go...

    History


    Pre-Christian origins

    Main article: List of winter festivals
    A winter festival was traditionally the most popular festival of the year in many cultures. Reasons included less agricultural work needing to be done during the winter, as well as people expecting longer days and shorter nights after the winter solstice in the Northern Hemisphere.[4] In part, the Christmas celebration was created by the early Church in order to entice pagan Romans to convert to Christianity without losing their own winter celebrations.[5][4] Certain prominent gods and goddesses of other religions in the region had their birthdays celebrated on December 25, including Ishtar, Sol Invictus and Mithras . Various traditions are considered to have been syncretised from winter festivals including the following:

    Saturnalia

    Main article: Saturnalia
    In Roman times, the best-known winter festival was Saturnalia, which was popular throughout Italy. Saturnalia was a time of general relaxation, feasting, merry-making, and a cessation of formal rules. It included the making and giving of small presents (Saturnalia et Sigillaricia), including small dolls for children and candles for adults.[6] During Saturnalia, business was postponed and even slaves feasted. There was drinking, gambling, and singing, and even public nudity. It was the "best of days," according to the poet Catullus.[7] Saturnalia honored the god Saturn and began on December 17. The festival gradually lengthened until the late Republican period, when it was seven days (December 17–24). In imperial times, Saturnalia was shortened to five days.[8]

    Natalis Solis Invicti

    Main article: Sol Invictus

    Alleged representation of Christ in the form of the sun-god Helios or Sol Invictus riding in his chariot. Third century mosaic of the Vatican grottoes under St. Peter's Basilica, on the ceiling of the tomb of the Julii.


    The Romans held a festival on December 25 called Dies Natalis Solis Invicti, "the birthday of the unconquered sun." The use of the title Sol Invictus allowed several solar deities to be worshipped collectively, including Elah-Gabal, a Syrian sun god; Sol, the god of Emperor Aurelian (AD 270–274); and Mithras, a soldiers' god of Persian origin.[9] Emperor Elagabalus (218–222) introduced the festival, and it reached the height of its popularity under Aurelian, who promoted it as an empire-wide holiday.[10]
    December 25 was also considered to be the date of the winter solstice, which the Romans called bruma.[6] It was therefore the day the Sun proved itself to be "unconquered" despite the shortening of daylight hours. (When Julius Caesar introduced the Julian Calendar in 45 BC, December 25 was approximately the date of the solstice. In modern times, the solstice falls on December 21 or 22.) The Sol Invictus festival has a "strong claim on the responsibility" for the date of Christmas, according to the Catholic Encyclopedia.[1] Several early Christian writers connected the rebirth of the sun to the birth of Jesus[11] "O, how wonderfully acted Providence that on that day on which that Sun was born . . . Christ should be born," Cyprian wrote.[1]

    Yule

    Main article: Yule
    Pagan Scandinavia celebrated a winter festival called Yule, held in the late December to early January period. Yule logs were lit to honor Thor, the god of thunder, with the belief that each spark from the fire represented a new pig or calf that would be born during the coming year. Feasting would continue until the log burned out, which could take as many as twelve days.[4] In pagan Germania (not to be confused with Germany), the equivalent holiday was the mid-winter night which was followed by 12 "wild nights", filled with eating, drinking and partying.[12] As Northern Europe was the last part to Christianize, its pagan celebrations had a major influence on Christmas. Scandinavians still call Christmas Jul. In English, the Germanic word Yule is synonymous with Christmas,[13] a usage first recorded in 900.

    Christian origins


    Origen, a father of the Christian church, argued against the celebration of birthdays, including the birth of Christ.


    It is unknown exactly when or why December 25 became associated with Christ's birth. The New Testament does not give a specific date.[11] Sextus Julius Africanus popularized the idea that Christ was born on December 25 in his Chronographiai, a reference book for Christians written in AD 221.[11] This date is nine months after the traditional date of the Incarnation (March 25), now celebrated as the Feast of the Annunciation. March 25 was considered to be the date of the vernal equinox and therefore the creation of Adam; early Christians believed this was also the date Christ was crucified. The Christian idea that Christ was conceived on the same date that he died on the cross is consistent with a Jewish belief that a prophet lived an integral number of years.[14] Thus, the date as a birthdate for Christ is traditional, and is not considered to be his actual date of birth. Those who ascribe to the Jesus myth hypothesis interpret the mythological narrative of the birth of Christ as ahistorical, and that the figure of Christ is a composite from various ancient mythologies, and thus there was no historical Christ.
    The identification of the birth date of Christ did not at first inspire feasting or celebration. Tertullian does not mention it as a major feast day in the Church of Roman Africa. In 245, the theologian Origen denounced the idea of celebrating Christ's birthday "as if he were a king pharaoh." He contended that only sinners, not saints, celebrated their birthdays.[15]
    The earliest reference to the celebration of Christmas is in the Chronography of 354, an illuminated manuscript compiled in Rome in 354.[1][16] In the east, meanwhile, Christians celebrated the birth of Christ as part of Epiphany (January 6), although this festival focused on the baptism of Jesus.[17]
    Christmas was promoted in the east as part of the revival of Catholicism following the death of the pro-Arian Emperor Valens at the Battle of Adrianople in 378. The feast was introduced to Constantinople in 379, to Antioch in about 380, and to Alexandria in about 430. Christmas was especially controversial in 4th century Constantinople, being the "fortress of Arianism," as Edward Gibbon described it. The feast disappeared after Gregory of Nazianzus resigned as bishop in 381, although it was reintroduced by John Chrysostom in about 400.[1] The Twelve Days of Christmas are the twelve days from Christmas Day to the Feast of Epiphany on January 6 that encompass the major feasts surrounding the birth of Christ: a week after Christmas Day on January 1 is the Feast of the Naming and Circumcision of Christ (Jesus was a Jew). The naming of Christ is the formal end of the Christmas story in Luke. The Feast of the Epiphany marks the visit of the Magi (wise men) and is the formal end of the Christmas story in Matthew.

  9. #9
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    Gee KW - thanks for all of that - anyone would think you are worried about your initial post

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    Quote Originally Posted by MeMock View Post
    so tell me king willy - why is the print on her knickers written in reverse?

    so presumably when you peel them off in the middle of the 69 position you can read what they say!

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    Quote Originally Posted by MeMock View Post
    Gee KW - thanks for all of that - anyone would think you are worried about your initial post
    just answering some questions for you, since i thought u were concerned about it.

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    so tell me king willy - whats a 69 position?

  13. #13
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    ^


    Quote Originally Posted by MeMock
    so tell me king willy - whats a 69 position?

  14. #14
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    so tell me king willy - whats a troll?

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    Quote Originally Posted by MeMock
    so tell me king willy - whats a troll?
    you are in a trollish mood today memock, wotz wrong, no sex for a month ??

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    once a month?

    I wish mate

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    ^ WOT ?

    holy crap,

    QUICK DD - can we sponsor MM a freebie down soi yodasak???


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    I think they are missing him here too

    Quote Originally Posted by MeMock View Post
    Mmmm red lights outside a building in Kalgoorlie.....interesting!

    Click here The History of The Red House Kalgoorlie for more info

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    so tell me king willy - why is the print on her knickers written in reverse?

    She's a blonde of course, she needs to know the date everyday and what better way to put it on the thing that she can look at every day as it come off.

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    Good Yule.
    Last edited by Frankenstein; 15-12-2007 at 10:44 PM.

  21. #21
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    Merry Christmas, K Dublya and everyone at Teak Door.


  22. #22
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    and all also, now to practice that random act of kindness, go to a store and purchase a childs gift,and donate it..it,ll make you feel good

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    Right...it's most definitely Christmas, not Xmas. Folks who shorten it to Xmas are lazy fucks...

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    Merry Christmas to all at TD




    Hope you all have a happy and prosperous new year.

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    Deleted - picture to big

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