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  1. #1
    Thailand Expat David48atTD's Avatar
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    Hackers tricked a Tesla, the race to fool artificial intelligence

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    Following on from ... http://teakdoor.com/the-teakdoor-lou...-learning.html (Be Mindfull - Amazon's Alexa is listening and learning)




    A sticker on the road. A pile of salt. These are things that could cause a semi-automated car to drift.

    Key points:
    • Researchers show how white dots on a road could push a Tesla in autopilot into the wrong lane
    • Tesla says drivers can always override autopilot, and "should always be prepared to do so"
    • The research raises complex legal questions about tricking a computer versus hacking it



    Using white dots stuck on the tarmac, a recent study from Tencent Keen Security Lab in China pushed a Tesla Model S onto the wrong side of the road.
    This is not computer hacking. At least, not in the darkened-room-and-hoodies sense of the word.
    As more of daily life moves not only online but into the orbit of intelligent machines, computer scientists and lawyers are debating a fuzzy line: when are you hacking a computer and when are you simply tricking it?

    Tesla said it already fixed the key vulnerability raised by the report, adding that drivers can override autopilot at any point, and "should always be prepared to do so".
    Yet what makes the work so interesting is the researchers didn't have to alter the car's code. They just used its own cameras and sensors, which look for lane markings, against it.

    At Harvard University, Ariel Herbert-Voss studies adversarial machine learning — where an attacker uses external signals to force an AI system into making an incorrect prediction, like choosing the wrong lane.

    Ms Herbert-Voss grew up hacking computers and doesn't see much of a distinction, if any at all, between hacking a system and tricking it.
    Hackers usually want to make money, she said, or to "cause some general chaos".

    "In most cases it just involves fooling a system somehow, and usually they want to take the path of least resistance.

    "So, if you can fool a car by just having a bunch of stickers on the road, I guarantee you hackers are going do that."


    More here


    Me? ... no alexia to make my shopping list, no driverless cars ... I don't even have FaceBook/Twitter/Instagram

    And you know what ... I'm so happy

    BTW, I got my hole in one today*



    *If Putt Putt counts
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  2. #2
    Thailand Expat
    Takeovers's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by David48atTD View Post
    Key points:
    Researchers show how white dots on a road could push a Tesla in autopilot into the wrong lane
    Tesla says drivers can always override autopilot, and "should always be prepared to do so"
    The research raises complex legal questions about tricking a computer versus hacking it
    Automated driving is not what it needs to be yet. But it will get there. We are already at the point where an automated system plus the driver at the wheel is safer than the driver alone as proven on the street with a huge number of km.

    As this article states things like this are valuable and enable improvements on the system. The day is not as far as you may think when automated driving will be much safer than manual driving. At that point insurance companies will charge a premium for manual driving.

    With an aging population self driving cars will be valuable. Some old people should not drive and they do it anyway. Or their mobility is seriously reduced.

    Fooling an automated driving system will be treated just like throwing stones at the windshield from a bridge. I don't think new legislation is needed for that though clarifications may be useful.
    "don't attribute to malice what can be adequately explained by incompetence"

  3. #3
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    harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    There is no room for self driving cars while there are morons driving normal ones.

    Ford CEO Jim Hackett scaled back hopes about the company's plans for self-driving cars this week, admitting that the first vehicles will have limits. "We overestimated the arrival of autonomous vehicles," said Hackett, who once headed the company's autonomous vehicle division, at a Detroit Economic Club event on Tuesday. While Ford still plans on launching its self-driving car fleet in 2021, Hackett added that "its applications will be narrow, what we call geo-fenced, because the problem is so complex."

  4. #4
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    Buckaroo Banzai's Avatar
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    IMO Autonomous vehicles for general application is a long way off, and a marketing tool at this point.
    Any system that requires user assistance is by definition not autonomous.
    AI will be truly autonomous when the following simple sentence is truly autonomously and for general application resolved and fully understood by AI.
    "Make me a cup of coffee"
    The sooner you fall behind, the more time you have to catch up.

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