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  1. #1
    Thailand Expat David48atTD's Avatar
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    Thai-Burma Railway ... 75 years since completed


    Prisoners of war laying track on the Burma-Thailand Railway around 1943

    It's been 75 years, but former prisoner of war Colin Hamley has not forgotten how special a gift from a mate was as he celebrated his 21st birthday while working on the notorious Thai-Burma Railway in Burma.

    "My mate gave me a present," Mr Hamley, now aged 96, said.
    "He pulled out a packet of 10 cigarettes that he had kept for the last 18 months.

    "We shared this packet of cigarettes on my 21st birthday in June 1943. That's how you got through. You had people you could rely on all the time."
    It's estimated around 200,000 labourers from Asia also worked on the Thai-Burma Railway project under slave-like conditions, with estimates that up to 75,000 of those men died during the work.




    (awaiting incoming red from Ray as he seems to dislike these stories)
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Thai-Burma Railway ... 75 years since completed-6930900-3x2-940x627.jpg  

    “Someone is sitting in the shade today because someone planted a tree a long time ago”

    .

  2. #2
    The Fool on the Hill
    bowie's Avatar
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    Sorry, can't green ya, yet, more spreading needed, but, thanks

    Have attended a couple of the ANZAC Day Memorial Services in Kanchanaburi, most recent was April 25, ‘18. Absolutely incredible story and engineering feat. After attending services and reviewing several of the graveyards and museums, getting a real feel for the atrocities that did occur on the Death Railroad – well “Two Bombs Weren’t Enough”.

    A highly recommended excursion to the Bridge on the River Kwaii.

    ANZAC Day Dawn Service at Hellfire Pass in Kanchanaburi on 25 April ? Thai Travel News & Events

  3. #3
    POTUS HOCUS
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    Thank you, my pa was in Burma at that time in the Arakan and Prome and he and his comrades returned their Burma Stars when Emperor Hirohito was invited to ride down the Mall in state

    Trade trumped honor and respect for the Burma survivors and their maimed and fallen colleagues.

    Disrespect for veterans who risked their lives is widespread
    I used to have a job at a calendar factory.
    I got the sack because
    I took a couple of days off.

  4. #4
    The Fool on the Hill
    bowie's Avatar
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    Wiki - Death Railroad Stats

    The Burma Railway, also known as the Death Railway, the Siam–Burma Railway, the Thai–Burma Railway and similar names, was a 415-kilometre (258 mi) railway between Ban Pong, Thailand, and Thanbyuzayat, Burma, built by the Empire of Japan in 1943 to support its forces in the Burma campaign of World War II. This railway completed the rail link between Bangkok, Thailand, and Rangoon, Burma (now Yangon). The name used by the Japanese Government is 泰緬連接鉄道 (Thai–Men-Rensetsu-Tetsudou), which means Thailand-Myanmar-Link-Railway.

    The line was closed in 1947, but the section between Nong Pla Duk and Nam Tok was reopened ten years later.

    Between 180,000 and 250,000 Southeast Asian civilian labourers (rōmusha) and about 61,000 Allied prisoners of war were subjected to forced labour during its construction. About 90,000 civilian labourers and more than 12,000 Allied prisoners died.


    That's about 250 dead per km of railroad
    Last edited by bowie; 16-10-2018 at 04:48 PM. Reason: add comment

  5. #5
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    The allied POW graveyard in Kanchanaburi near the river is a must see, as is the Death Railway Museum. I can't post photos yet, but I visited earlier this year. Sobering and well worth a visit.

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