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  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by katie23 View Post
    Do those puddings have filling inside, like a pie?

    Sorry, heathen here. Have never eaten (or previously heard of) Yorkshire pudding.
    No.
    It's a loose batter poured into the smoking hot fat after a piece of beef has been roasted. They puff up and are basically deep fried flour, eggs, and milk. You can also pour the drippings fat into individual muffin tins for the same but neater result. Has to be smoking hot!

  2. #27
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    The recipe has never been patented because it’s too simple. The production method is the key.

    Usually individual sized ones are eaten with a roast dinner, usually beef, as a savoury side dish. Delicious in the larger form filled with meat and gravy. Popular pub grub.

    As kids we would take the leftover individual puddings and add jam when we woke up from a Sunday aftrnoon nap, brought on by watching Black and white films on tv explaining how our brave chaps stuffed mr Hitler in WWII.

  3. #28
    hangin' around cyrille's Avatar
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    When you were a kid that would just have been 'The News', no?

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by katie23 View Post
    Do those puddings have filling inside, like a pie?

    Sorry, heathen here. Have never eaten (or previously heard of) Yorkshire pudding.

    Simple recipe is listed in the Dinner Thread here...http://teakdoor.com/the-kitchen/9619...ml#post3779425 (Dinner)

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyrille View Post
    When you were a kid that would just have been 'The News', no?
    Not quite that ancient Cy. Born 1954

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chittychangchang View Post
    we detest the Americanisation of anything quintessentially British.
    I am still miffed about the Britishisation of baked beans.

  7. #32
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    Bullox ~ Different variations of the original recipe can be found in both Canada, and the U.S., dating back to the late 1940s, as I (vividly) recall.

    Thus, the original Yorkshire Pudding (Pie) "recipe" is not a new arrival to the North American continent. Even my country farm-girl Mama had that recipe.

    The British seem to get their knickers-in-a-twist about nearly every "nickel_&_dime" trivial thing, anymore. So, take a chill-pill there blokes,
    and then find a more valid issue for having (yet) another Little Lord Fauntleroy about whatever? Don't worry, be happy! Cheers!
    Last edited by TuskegeeBen; 12-06-2018 at 06:20 PM.

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chittychangchang View Post
    It's gone viral!

    The Yorkshire pudding revolution has spread to issan,
    Typical Thai food, no idea as to the texture of a Yorkshire Pudding. But its the same shape, burnt to a crisp and probably has flour "with added sugar". I'm sure it lasts a long time on the market stall so probably accepted by Thais as a cold dish.

    Quote Originally Posted by SKkin View Post
    We call those individual pan pizzas here...or personal pan pizzas.
    Try looking at the Yorkshire Pudding offering from the supermarket. Note the very large air spaces in the pudding. I suggest you eat a real Yorkshire pudding and your pizza in the same sitting. I suggest you may notice the difference of the crispy aerated Yorkshire Pudding and your stodgey pizza dough pastry.

    Quote Originally Posted by Airportwo View Post
    the gravy that would be served in/with the Yorkshire pudding was made from the juices of the meat and vegetables and was in itself a "treat"
    But a shock to those who had never had the Yorkshire Pudding, as a first course. I was however happy when the meat and vegetables second course arrived.


    Quote Originally Posted by katie23 View Post
    Have never eaten (or previously heard of) Yorkshire pudding.
    Have you ever eaten a English roast beef Sunday lunch?
    Last edited by OhOh; 12-06-2018 at 05:40 PM.
    A tray full of GOLD is not worth a moment in time.

  9. #34
    f o r u m ghoul SKkin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    Try looking at the Yorkshire Pudding offering from the supermarket. Note the very large air spaces in the pudding. I suggest you eat a real Yorkshire pudding and your pizza in the same sitting. I suggest you may notice the difference of the crispy aerated Yorkshire Pudding and your stodgey pizza dough pastry.
    Probably very true, but they sure look very similar on the outside.

  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by SKkin View Post
    they sure look very similar on the outside
    Which in Thailand is enough.

  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    Which in Thailand is enough.
    True!

  12. #37
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    What will Americans call Toad-in-the-hole when they discover that?

  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by VocalNeal View Post
    What will Americans call Toad-in-the-hole when they discover that?
    They would need to discover real sausages first. The hot dog bockwurst copy doesn’t cut it.

    Anyway toad in the hole is yet another British speciality.

    Ever tried sage and onion Yorkshire pud Neal?

  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by VocalNeal View Post
    What will Americans call Toad-in-the-hole when they discover that?
    Or spotted dick.

  15. #40
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    The good old Yorkshire pud used to be served before the main meal in poor or working class homes, basically to 'fill up' people due to the fact that there wasn't much to eat afterwards, either due to war-time rationing or poverty.
    Can't see that being a factor for the Shermans.

  16. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Switch View Post
    They would need to discover real sausages first. The hot dog bockwurst copy doesn’t cut it.
    Plenty of good sausage here. Lots of German immigrants came over and a fair amount of them still have butcher shops or bigger. I stop buy often. Usually grab a couple of rib eye steaks at the same time. Fuck the Oscar Meyer shit.

  17. #42
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    The British really need to sort out the definition of the term pudding.

  18. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rusty Rebar View Post
    The British really need to sort out the definition of the term pudding.
    That’s not our job. When merkins call a pizza a pie, we decided to leave the stupid fucks to it

  19. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Switch View Post
    That’s not our job. When merkins call a pizza a pie, we decided to leave the stupid fucks to it
    Well now you guys seem quite protective of that lump of pastry, claiming some sort of trademark. People have been eating variants of this for thousands of years, they mostly called it bread. But that pizza you mentioned is more like a pie than your pastry is like a pudding. In fact most of the world considers a pudding to be a sweet thick sauce, that can be made in various flavors and generally considered a dessert item.

  20. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rusty Rebar View Post
    In fact most of the world considers a pudding to be a sweet thick sauce, that can be made in various flavors and generally considered a dessert item.
    Most of YOUR world, that is.
    Indeed, pudding is often considered to be dessert. But most of the English-speaking world, with the exception of the US, realises that a single word can have many applications.
    I daresay there's some etymology that could explain "pudding" for you, and I would hazard a guess that black pudding (blood sausage) and Yorkshire pudding would fit into the original meaning of the word.


    As an aside, just asking; Is the "Rusty" in your handle rusty as in "rusty trombone", and does "rebar" have connotations of a long hard cylinder?
    Tom might be interested.

  21. #46
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    Wiki has some words to add

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pudding


    Brazilian pudim de leite (milk pudding)
    Type Pudding
    Cookbook: Pudding Media: Pudding
    Pudding is a type of food that can be either a dessert or a savory dish. The word pudding is believed to come from the French boudin, originally from the Latin botellus, meaning "small sausage", referring to encased meats used in medieval European puddings.[1] The modern usage of the word pudding to denote primarily desserts has evolved over time from the almost exclusive use of the term to describe savory dishes, specifically those created using a process similar to sausages where meat and other ingredients in a mostly liquid form are encased and then steamed or boiled to set the contents. Black pudding, Yorkshire pudding, and haggis survive from this tradition.

  22. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by toslti View Post
    Wiki has some words to add

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pudding


    Brazilian pudim de leite (milk pudding)
    Type Pudding
    Cookbook: Pudding Media: Pudding
    Pudding is a type of food that can be either a dessert or a savory dish. The word pudding is believed to come from the French boudin, originally from the Latin botellus, meaning "small sausage", referring to encased meats used in medieval European puddings.[1] The modern usage of the word pudding to denote primarily desserts has evolved over time from the almost exclusive use of the term to describe savory dishes, specifically those created using a process similar to sausages where meat and other ingredients in a mostly liquid form are encased and then steamed or boiled to set the contents. Black pudding, Yorkshire pudding, and haggis survive from this tradition.
    Whitened that for the readers.

  23. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by toslti View Post
    Wiki has some words to add

    Pudding is a type of food that can be either a dessert or a savory dish. The word pudding is believed to come from the French boudin, originally from the Latin botellus, meaning "small sausage", r
    Which is how we came up with the words.... Pull your pudding.

  24. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by toslti View Post
    I suspect the ameristani editors, who have such a minimum of history, have something to do with there usage of "The modern usage of the word pudding". They can't let the Europeans have any historic meanings exist in this doctored "modern world" can we.

  25. #50
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    I've also heard pudding used to mean a silly person.

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