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  1. #1
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    david44's Avatar
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    Would you ride a "BIRD"

    Seems like my childhood with boost,I imagine they'd all be stolen and vanish to Laos in the dark hereabouts

    https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2...anta-monica-uk

    For those who've never visited Santa Monica is a fun place

    Are ride-share electric scooters the future of urban transport?

    Scooters have taken over Santa Monica, caused fury in San Francisco and are spreading to other US cities and likely Britain. Are they fun and environmentally friendly – or a dangerous nuisance?


    Bird electric scooter riders in Santa Monica, California. Photograph: Dan Tuffs for the Guardian
    Electric share scooters have taken over Santa Monica, an affluent beachside city on the edge of Los Angeles, but as they swiftly spread across other cities in California and the US a backlash is already gathering force.

    Download an app, scan a scooter’s barcode and away you go, zipping at up to 15mph to your destination. You leave the scooter on the pavement for the next rider.

    Bird, a startup run by former Uber executives, launched the scooters in Santa Monica last September. Hundreds were deposited around the city overnight, the devices so ubiquitous people literally tripped over them.
    They have thrilled, bemused and aggravated – feelings San Francisco, San Jose, Austin and Washington DC are now experiencing as scooters from Bird and two other startups, LimeBike and Spin, hit their streets, with dozens more cities due to receive them this year.
    A full-scale backlash is under way in San Francisco, where some scooters have been tossed into trash cans and lakes. The city attorney has threatened to impound scooters, calling them dangerous, unlawful and examples of tech arrogance. City hall is exploring ways to regulate the devices.







    Bird says there are 50,000 regular riders in and around Santa Monica. Photograph: Dan Tuffs for the Guardian
    With a global market in their sights, the scooter startups are pushing back

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    Bird comes armed with $115m (£80.3m) in investment funding and seems to take the Uber-esque, hard-charging stance on regulation that it is better to seek forgiveness than permission. A tangle with Santa Monica officials earned a criminal complaint and hefty fine.
    “The demand is huge. We’re looking to reach more than 50 markets this year and eventually have Birds all over the world,” says Stephen Schnell, the company’s vice president of operations, noting that Britain is on the company’s radar. “We try to pick cities that have bicycle lane infrastructure.”
    Schnell, like Bird’s CEO Travis VanderZanden, previously worked at Lyft and Uber.
    Ride sharing companies are shaking up urban transport but many commuters still have the “last mile” problem: a distance too far to walk and too short to drive, says Schnell. “This is a way to get people out of their vehicles.”
    Marlon Boarnet, an urban planning and spatial analysis professor at the University of Southern California, says dockless scooters can facilitate short trips while being light on the environment and using minimal space.
    “Traditionally we view this as walking or bicycling, but the concept can and should be extended to light and small powered vehicles like electric scooters. One could also include in this set small neighborhood electric vehicles or electric motor assisted bicycles. We should expand our idea of what an acceptable ‘short trip’ vehicle is.”
    Boarnet hopes the companies and city authorities can resolve issues such as where the scooters are left. When clumped in the middle of a pavement scooters can seem more nuisance clutter than transport revolution.
    The boom and bust of dockless bicycles in several markets – exemplified by a picture of a bicycle graveyard in China – act as a cautionary tale.





    Riders are meant to wear helmets and need a driver’s licence to download the app. Photograph: Dan Tuffs for the Guardian
    The Guardian scooted around Santa Monica for a week to try them out. The longest journey was from the city’s downtown to Bird’s headquarters in Venice, three miles away. It took 17 minutes and cost $3.55 – a $1 base fee plus 15 cents per minute.

    The experience was positive. Scooters were easy to find with the app’s map pinpointing devices left by trees, parking meters, benches and doorways.
    Once you’ve scanned and unlocked the barcode with your phone there’s a childlike glee in kicking off with your foot, pushing the handlebar’s throttle button and gliding down the street.
    Not encased in a shell of metal and glass, you feel connected to your surroundings – both hands are needed to steer so it is difficult to text or fiddle with your phone.


    Tootling down Main Street, the most striking impression was the response of pedestrians, cyclists, skateboarders and motorists: in most cases there wasn’t one. In September the scooters were a novelty and drew stares. Now they’re part of the streetscape and barely remarked upon – except by some tourists who gawk and take pictures.
    Bird reports quick adoption; there are more than 50,000 regular riders in and around Santa Monica, and riders in San Francisco notched up more than 60,000 miles in just 17 days. “It’s kind of amazing,” says Schnell.
    What’s amazing, say critics, is the irresponsibility of the scooter companies and many of their riders.
    Few wear helmets in Santa Monica. It is common to see children riding scooters, two people on one scooter, parked scooters cluttering sidewalks and moving scooters scattering pedestrians on sidewalks. San Francisco residents have joined Santa Monicans in venting on social media.




    I used to have a job at a calendar factory.
    I got the sack because
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  2. #2
    I am in Jail

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    No thanks

  3. #3
    Thailand Expat

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    want.

  4. #4
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    david44's Avatar
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    #metoo

    I got a new adreess for Santa Claus@aliexpress or taobao

    Anyone seen i stores in Thailand'll be in C Mai soon ?

  5. #5
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    harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    They've got these rentable pushbikes in Chiang Mai. You rent them and track them through an app.

    Several have ended up the in the river.

    Of course I'm sure that has nothing to do with tuk tuk or songthaew drivers.

    https://mobike.com/global/blog/post/chiang_mai

  6. #6
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    No thanks. Outgrew them when I was old enough to ride a bicycle.

    noting that Britain is on the company’s radar. “We try to pick cities that have bicycle lane infrastructure.”
    Stevenage and Welwyn Garden City? Hardly the centres of hip modern culture? .and they wear shirts in Stevenage?

    Same shit will happen as it does all over the world. Scooters have a limited and inconvenient lifespan. No one will maintain them . They will end up as rubbish and eye sores every where.

    Bird is simply an excuse for an IPO then it will all disappear along with all the money.
    Last edited by VocalNeal; 26-04-2018 at 11:18 AM.
    Better to think inside the pub, than outside the box?
    I apologize if any offence was caused. unless it was intended.
    You people, you think I know feck nothing; I tell you: I know feck all
    Those who cannot change their mind, cannot change anything.

  7. #7
    I am in Jail

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    Would you ride a bird?

    Hmm, not if it has a pecker.


    Fish

  8. #8
    disturbance in the Turnip baldrick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    Several have ended up the in the river.
    the photos of discarded share bikes in china are freaky

    https://www.theatlantic.com/photo/20...cycles/556268/

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    Latindancer's Avatar
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    ^ My ghod ! What a waste. So much for the spirit of Communism in modern Chinese people...

  10. #10
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    Kunming started the bike share last year. Worked great at first. Maintenance problems, flat tires, broken down bikes and everything has gone down hill. Still works but you see trashed / abandoned bikes scattered across the city. Seems to work OK in smaller towns though where the numbers of bikes are more manageable.

  11. #11
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    david44's Avatar
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    Extraordinary
    Tragic such a waste
    I guess Chinese now richer with cars mobiles they are not re- purposed.
    Looks enough to give every kid in some poor place like B Desh Timor or Lao a free bike.

    For all the "success' state sponsored growth has led to a few white elephants in China.
    I read there are enitre new build ghost cities saw photos possibly here .

    Near the 4th friendship bridge there is New C Khong a few blocks of mainly unoccupied shop houses and a market with more vendors than clients all built for a trade boom that may yet happen.
    Last edited by david44; 26-04-2018 at 01:38 PM.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Latindancer View Post
    So much for the spirit of Communism in modern Chinese people
    Quote Originally Posted by david44 View Post
    For all the "success' state sponsored growth has led to a few white elephants in China.
    The company was private, good stories, lots of investors, made a mint and went bankrupt. I've not heard if he was shot using s AA gun yet.

    From baldricks link:

    "As some of the companies who jumped in too big and too early have begun to fold, their huge surplus of bicycles can be found collecting dust in vast vacant lots. Bike sharing remains very popular in China, and will likely continue to grow, just probably at a more sustainable rate. Meanwhile, we are left with these images of speculation gone wild—the piles of debris left behind after the bubble bursts."

    At least the "bubble" created useable products, not just imaginary tokens. For the right price they could indeed be purchased by some of those " respectable charities" and used around the world.Both by the "charity" workers and the locals.
    A tray full of GOLD is not worth a moment in time.

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