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  1. #176
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maanaam
    This guy's knife seems a bit shorter and heavier.
    Ya well there are lots of vids on youtube about that one. I think I will pick one up.

    Quote Originally Posted by Maanaam
    Here you see a Fijian opening a coconut in 3 chops.
    Also be good to snag a piece of wood with or something like that. Useful no doubt.

  2. #177
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maanaam View Post
    Compared to a machete, it is indeed light weight.
    Color me sold. After I close on my little piece of paradise, I'll be doing some clearing (not backhoe/bulldoze type) by hand and it seems ideal.

    Of course, I've always been the type (with certain things) who thinks: "Why not just have both?"

    In other words, I'll keep the machete(s) but still add a few variable sizes and weights of this cane knife (which is honestly new to me) to the tool group/arsenal.

    It looks very versatile and the bonus of balanced throwing makes it a creditable weapon, too.

  3. #178
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    Maanaam,

    Can you look at the opening page of amazon

    search: cane knife

    https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_n...rds=cane+knife

    And tell me if those are all crap or not?

    I got a real decent Wetterlings hatchet thru Amazon, so I don't believe that all their junk is crap.

  4. #179
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maanaam View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by ENT
    you've not slaughtered/skinned thousands of animals as you've claimed
    Right there you prove again your inability to read and comprehend. I never made that claim or anything like it.
    Read my post again, amended before your comment, above. where you claimed to have killed countless animals.

    Quote Originally Posted by ENT
    The only long bladed knife at all suitable out bush is a machete, a broad bladed heavy cane knife's not bad, heavy enough to hack wood, but no a "cane knife" slim enough to cut grass or flick coconuts.
    Until you've spent years using a cane knife to pick up and collect coconuts, to chop firewood, to "mow" the lawn, to open coconuts, clear brush, etc etc, you will have no idea whatsoever. A machete is a pain. Heavy and unweildy. the thin-bladed cane knife has enough impetus to strike deep, while the width gives strength.
    Over time, your cane knife gets filed down to be narrower...then they become even better as they are half the weight.
    True, as thin blades cut easier than thick ones when slashing. Using one of those to chop logs or tree limbs is a total pain, they're too light in the bush.

    You have no idea. About cane knives nor dressing animals.
    Really? I spent two seasons cutting cane outside Cairns Qld in the early 1970s before moving onto the tobacco.

    I also spent more than 15 years butchering stock or game in NZ, and know far more than you do about hands on dressing and butchering animals than you so clumsily waffle on about.
    I spent years in Westfield, mainly, but also Auckland Abbatoir, Southdown, Hellaby's, Horotiu and Whangarei, as a meat inspector
    What qualified you as a meat inspector for MAF? You only have a BEng.
    and I know what goes on in the works
    You don't, as demonstrated by your description of skinning and gutting a beast.
    I also killed and dressed cows, goats and pigs on the farm Countless Many, many.
    Total bollocks, pal.
    And deer in NZ.
    Hahaha! Never did you do that! You wouldn't know where to start
    I do know what I'm talking about.
    Going by your descriptions of the skinning and gutting process(in reverse order too..), you know diddly squat about the game.
    Never dressed a sheep
    I believe that.
    though I have seen tens of thousands processed in the freezing works.[
    Well you weren't very observant were you if you missed the initial cuts and how the skin's removed after gutting.
    Quote Originally Posted by ENT
    This is NOT a lightweight knife by any means, and NOT as you earlier described
    Compared to a machete, it is indeed light weight. I was not comparing to a fruit paring knife.
    A lightweight cane knife's useless for surviving in the bush, If you need to slash your way through, a machete's a far better tool.

    Personally, I prefer a heavy bladed steel, bowie style knife, horn handle, 10 inch long blade, 1.5 inches wide, 3/16 inch thick steel, hollow ground on left side, heavy enough to chop branches, split kindling effortlessly, whittle wood to shape, stick a pig, open up a carcass to gut it, useless for skinning, but it can crack bones open, dismember a beast, is great as a can opener, you can even shave with it if you look after it and polish it properly,...easily kept sharp with a stone.

  5. #180
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  6. #181
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    Quote Originally Posted by hick View Post
    Maanaam,

    Can you look at the opening page of amazon

    search: cane knife

    https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_n...rds=cane+knife

    And tell me if those are all crap or not?

    I got a real decent Wetterlings hatchet thru Amazon, so I don't believe that all their junk is crap.
    Without trying them I can't say if they are crap or not, but I have seen some crap ones in shops.
    Of the ones in the link....
    13 inches is too short a blade by far IMO.
    They all (except the Tramontina) have short handles which are no good, but easily re-fitted by yourself with a long handle like the one in my pic above. They all have around 8 inch tangs with holes for "rivets" (I can expound on why I put that in inverted commas).
    The Tramontina (same as the vid above) has a nice handle, but to my perception is a bit short and heavy....but looks "ok". It would do.
    If not the Tramontina, I would go for the Okapi and replace the handle with a hardwood longer handle. I recall Okapi pocket knives...not great steel, but not bad for the price. If I remember correctly, my dad did get an Okapi short handle....not the best, but if it has a 20 inch or more blade I'd go for it.
    I think my trusty hunting knife may be Tramontina...it rings a big bell.
    In a way, I like the tramontina for the pommel on the handle. My home-made handles were never that fancy.

  7. #182
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    I would say this is the best of them;

    https://www.amazon.com/Okapi-Knife-T...rds=cane+knife

    But Tramontina has the best repo...

    It may not be a cane knife but I like this;

    https://www.amazon.com/Condor-Knife-...SM7DXM6KS6KPQ7

  8. #183
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    Quote Originally Posted by ENT View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Maanaam View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by ENT
    you've not slaughtered/skinned thousands of animals as you've claimed
    Right there you prove again your inability to read and comprehend. I never made that claim or anything like it.
    Read my post again, amended before your comment, above. where you claimed to have killed countless animals.

    Quote Originally Posted by ENT
    The only long bladed knife at all suitable out bush is a machete, a broad bladed heavy cane knife's not bad, heavy enough to hack wood, but no a "cane knife" slim enough to cut grass or flick coconuts.
    Until you've spent years using a cane knife to pick up and collect coconuts, to chop firewood, to "mow" the lawn, to open coconuts, clear brush, etc etc, you will have no idea whatsoever. A machete is a pain. Heavy and unweildy. the thin-bladed cane knife has enough impetus to strike deep, while the width gives strength.
    Over time, your cane knife gets filed down to be narrower...then they become even better as they are half the weight.
    True, as thin blades cut easier than thick ones when slashing. Using one of those to chop logs or tree limbs is a total pain, they're too light in the bush.


    Really? I spent two seasons cutting cane outside Cairns Qld in the early 1970s before moving onto the tobacco.

    I also spent more than 15 years butchering stock or game in NZ, and know far more than you do about hands on dressing and butchering animals than you so clumsily waffle on about.

    What qualified you as a meat inspector for MAF? You only have a BEng.

    You don't, as demonstrated by your description of skinning and gutting a beast.

    Total bollocks, pal.

    Hahaha! Never did you do that! You wouldn't know where to start
    Going by your descriptions of the skinning and gutting process(in reverse order too..), you know diddly squat about the game.
    Never dressed a sheep
    I believe that.
    though I have seen tens of thousands processed in the freezing works.[
    Well you weren't very observant were you if you missed the initial cuts and how the skin's removed after gutting.
    Quote Originally Posted by ENT
    This is NOT a lightweight knife by any means, and NOT as you earlier described
    Compared to a machete, it is indeed light weight. I was not comparing to a fruit paring knife.
    A lightweight cane knife's useless for surviving in the bush, If you need to slash your way through, a machete's a far better tool.

    Personally, I prefer a heavy bladed steel, bowie style knife, horn handle, 10 inch long blade, 1.5 inches wide, 3/16 inch thick steel, hollow ground on left side, heavy enough to chop branches, split kindling effortlessly, whittle wood to shape, stick a pig, open up a carcass to gut it, useless for skinning, but it can crack bones open, dismember a beast, is great as a can opener, you can even shave with it if you look after it and polish it properly,...easily kept sharp with a stone.
    You're a blowhard fool and know nothing about NZ meatworks or cane knives, and your supposed knowledge of dressing animals is possibly true, but of poor quality and comes from ignorance.
    To so confidently tell me what I know or don't know, what I am qualified for and what I am not qualified for, AGAIN shows how your claim to academic discipline and scientific procedure is all just a load of hot air.
    I did respond to your doubt the last time your so fallaciously claimed I could not possibly be a MAF inspector and a BE, but the thread was cleaned....I was made redundant in 1988 when Westfield was closing. My redundancy deal was take a lump sum or stay on salary (which was $28,500 at the time) and re-educate, including all course fees and book fees. I chose the latter despite just getting a mortgage, and went on to get my degree.
    Go on...go and google the minutiae. Make a fool of yourself yet again.



  9. #184
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    Quote Originally Posted by bsnub View Post
    I would say this is the best of them;

    https://www.amazon.com/Okapi-Knife-T...rds=cane+knife

    But Tramontina has the best repo...

    It may not be a cane knife but I like this;

    https://www.amazon.com/Condor-Knife-...SM7DXM6KS6KPQ7
    The second one looks nice, but looks really heavy. It would do, and probably quite well, but not for a full day of work; I think the weight would be telling.
    The first one is basically what I've been talking about. But file off the hook.

  10. #185
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    How about standards or parameters for pure wilderness bush-whacking (with a heavy back pack, slung 12 gauge, Ka Bar on the chest, etc.?)

    (as opposed to my earlier comment related to clearing)

  11. #186
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maanaam
    The second one looks nice, but looks really heavy.
    All of those are heavy and that is why I would not carry these if I was hiking. They are for car camping or around Hicks homestead.

    When on the move I will stick to my Bravo 1. It will still do all the tasks of these cane knives.

  12. #187
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    The Ka Bar waiting for me in FL:

    Blade measures 7 inches; knife is 11-7/8 inches long


    So (apart from getting what you have, bsnub) if in my situation, would you just plan to bushwhack with the knife or consider adding a machete or possibly a cane knife to my carry weight?


    If so, it'd be 12 gauge on right shoulder, ka bar on chest, machete (or cane) on left shoulder, hatchet on belt loop....

  13. #188
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    Quote Originally Posted by hick
    Ka Bar
    I hope you bought the real deal and not a cheap Chinese piece of crap. It is a good knife for sure. I think that you will quickly ditch that when you are in the great dark north.

  14. #189
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    says Made in USA. Should be good to go - but you haven't answered my question.

  15. #190
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    Quote Originally Posted by hick
    would you just plan to bushwhack with the knife or consider adding a machete or possibly a cane knife to my carry weight?
    silky gomboy 240.

  16. #191
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    Quote Originally Posted by bsnub View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by hick
    would you just plan to bushwhack with the knife or consider adding a machete or possibly a cane knife to my carry weight?
    silky gomboy 240.

    bushwhack with a folding saw? That's staying in the pack.

  17. #192
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    Quote Originally Posted by bsnub
    When on the move I will stick to my Bravo 1. It will still do all the tasks of these cane knives.
    I can assure you it will not . There's no getting away from the fact that the bravo is an excellent knife and can do some stuff better than a cane knife can...but not all stuff, and if you turn it around, a good cane knife can indeed do everything the Bravo can.


    Quote Originally Posted by hick
    How about standards or parameters for pure wilderness bush-whacking
    I guess I'm just used to holding a cane knife when walking through the plantation, the bush, or along the beach. It became an extension of my arm.
    So, maybe it's not for you or bsnub when hiking.
    I'm not used to an alpenstock and would not choose to use one, but I'm sure users swear by them. I guess my cane knife is no heavier than an alpenstock, yet FAR more useful, even in snow, but definitely not as good for things the alpenstock is designed for.

  18. #193
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    I'm thinking about giving the cane knife a go, Maa - but would have to pretty much order it online asap.

    When I get to FL, I'll have a LOT to do in 3 days, including sharpening implements.

    I guess I'll start researching brand names, weights and sizes...

    (I DO have lots of time on this end - it doesn't HAVE to be Amazon, could be brand direct order if they deliver to the US)

    ...and go with one that looks sturdy yet somewhat light.

    I'll look back at all the info. you've posted (tbh, I'm behind on reading in this thread) and scope it all out.

    I really do want something solid for bushwhacking. I'll be getting off-trail more than a dozen times on my upcoming trip and have already been repeatedly warned about heavy thicket and underbrush including; high bush cranberry, willow, alder, devil's club and blueberry brush. In short, it's going to be farking thick and I'll certainly be tromping for miles on some days.

  19. #194
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    ^ For the length that a cane knife is, and because it's not great steel (it will rust and bluntens quickly), I recommend a normal file for sharpening. A stone is too cumbersome and slow. This is not a precision tool, but an all-rounder hack to beat and abuse.

  20. #195
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    roger that


    You must spread some Reputation around before giving it to Maanaam again.

  21. #196
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maanaam View Post
    You're a blowhard fool and know nothing about NZ meatworks or cane knives,
    I know enough about them to say that you never observed the gutting and skinning process in them, going by your description of the process.
    your supposed knowledge of dressing animals is possibly true, but of poor quality and comes from ignorance
    .
    Shot yerself in the foot there, if you say on the one hand that my descriptions possibly true than on the other hand the knowledge comes from ignorance. Logic's not your strong point, is it? If you dispute the methods I've so far posted re, skinning and gutting and dressing animals from rabbits up to sheep, deer or cattle, explain why, instead of just throwing insults like a loser.
    To so confidently tell me what I know or don't know, what I am qualified for and what I am not qualified for, AGAIN shows how your claim to academic discipline and scientific procedure is all just a load of hot air.
    More insults, no logical argument again. I said nothing of your quals, I simply asked you what your qualifications are or were to be a MAF meat inspector.
    I did respond to your doubt the last time your so fallaciously claimed I could not possibly be a MAF inspector and a BE, but the thread was cleaned
    I didn't claim that. All I asked was how your BE could qualify you to be a MAF meat inspector...so far no answer.
    I was made redundant in 1988 when Westfield was closing. My redundancy deal was take a lump sum or stay on salary (which was $28,500 at the time) and re-educate, including all course fees and book fees. I chose the latter despite just getting a mortgage, and went on to get my degree.
    So you got a degree after you left the meatworks. Was that your B.Eng?
    It still doesn't explain what quals you think you need or had to be a MAF meat inspector though.
    Last edited by ENT; 28-05-2017 at 08:09 PM.

  22. #197
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    Inspect my meat, you sonofabitch. INSPECT IT!!!!

  23. #198
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    A bit of bush butchery...



  24. #199
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    Quote Originally Posted by ENT
    Shot yerself in the foot there, if you say on the one hand that my descriptions possibly true than on the other hand the knowledge comes from ignorance.
    The irony is huge. The rationale is non-existent. The non comprehension and the drawing of a flawed conclusion is AGAIN abundantly evident.

    Quote Originally Posted by ENT
    Logic's not your strong point, is it?
    I'll use my amusing little altered analogy again and see if you don't understand it again: The cast iron pot calling the stainless steel electric kettle black.



    And that's it from me. No more wasting time or even thoughts on a Dunning-Kruger syndrome fool.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Maanaam View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by ENT
    Shot yerself in the foot there, if you say on the one hand that my descriptions possibly true than on the other hand the knowledge comes from ignorance.
    The irony is huge. The rationale is non-existent. The non comprehension and the drawing of a flawed conclusion is AGAIN abundantly evident.
    As you so evidently did.
    Quote Originally Posted by ENT
    Logic's not your strong point, is it?
    I'll use my amusing little altered analogy again and see if you don't understand it again: The cast iron pot calling the stainless steel electric kettle black.
    Amusing? Nah, just plain dumb.
    And that's it from me. No more wasting time or even thoughts on a Dunning-Kruger syndrome fool.
    So you weren't a qualified NZMAF meat inspector after all.

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