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  1. #1
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    Colonial British

    When I was a lad there were some want to be posh fuckers from England who lived on the hill we lived on in Scotland.

    They used to refer to things such as tiffin and sundowners - old colonial speak.

    I have decided I like it and want to start using colonial speak everyday but I am having a hard time finding more so I need you TD'r's help to improve my colonial language.

  2. #2
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    ChiangMai noon's Avatar
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    What does tiffin mean?
    sundowners too for that matter.

  3. #3
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    sundowners is having some drinks in the early evening as the sun goes down. well that was what it was on the ships i sailed on anyway.........

  4. #4
    Rhubarb, rhubarb, rhubarb
    Sir Burr's Avatar
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    Stengah - Colonial for whisky and soda.

    Chota peg - A single measure of alcohol.

    Burra peg - A double shot.

    Pukka - Proper

    Sahib - White man.

    Memsahib - White woman.

    Dhobiwallah - Laundryman.

  5. #5
    Rhubarb, rhubarb, rhubarb
    Sir Burr's Avatar
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    Tiffin is lunch, usually carried in a tiffin carrier, those stainless steel bowls that stack with a fastener/handle.

    Sundowners are long alcoholic drinks you have as the sun goes down.

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    calling laundry 'dhobi' is a good one.

    interestingly(?) enough dhoby ghaut (mrt station at orchard road) is so named because the indian fellers used to do their washing in the river there.

  7. #7
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    a boy - was your servant who was there on call.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sir Burr
    Stengah - Colonial for whisky and soda.
    Isn't the word Malaysian or Indonesian for "half"; the drink so named because it was half whiskey and half soda?

  9. #9
    Rhubarb, rhubarb, rhubarb
    Sir Burr's Avatar
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    Yes, it's a Malay word, but, Malaya was part of the empire too, old boy.

    A badmash - a hoodlum.

    A rum cove - a dodgy person.

  10. #10
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    I've been searching for a dictionary but there isn't one available that I can find.

  11. #11
    Rhubarb, rhubarb, rhubarb
    Sir Burr's Avatar
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    Yes there is. The definitive dictionary for Anglo-Indian words is called Hobson-Jobson.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sir Burr
    Malaya was part of the empire too, old boy.
    So were we, I hasten to add....

  13. #13
    Thailand Expat

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    It is online

  14. #14
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    TEEK, adj. Exact, precise, punctual; also parsimonious, [a meaning which Platts does not record]. Used in N. India. Hind. thik.

    TICKER, adj. This is applied to any person or thing engaged by the job, or on contract. Thus a ticca garry is a hired carriage, a ticca doctor is a surgeon not in the regular service but temporarily engaged by Government. From Hind. thika, thikah, ‘hire, fare, fixed price.’

    Right then time for tiffin and a sundowner you bunch of tickers

  15. #15
    Rhubarb, rhubarb, rhubarb
    Sir Burr's Avatar
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    ^
    Did you get that from Hobson-Jobson?

  16. #16
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  17. #17
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  18. #18
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    or just watch some reruns or "'It ain't half hot mum" .

  19. #19
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    From HK-
    Amah- a maid
    Shroff - the bloke that takes your money at a car park or something
    Hong- a big company, traditionally one of the old opium selling conglomerates

  20. #20
    Being chased by sloths DJ Pat's Avatar
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    What about "civilian mufty"?

  21. #21
    Rhubarb, rhubarb, rhubarb
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    A mufti was a local who was hired to teach the newly arrived colonial how to speak, read and write the local lingo.

    TEFLers are sort of reverse muftis.

  22. #22
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    You've missed out khazi



  23. #23
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    Smile

    Interesting subject then. It's good to know. Now i learn a lof of new vocabualary. Are they being used only in Scotland, right???? I guess so. It's good idea to talk same as your ancestors, Languages represent the nationality.

  24. #24
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    ^No, a language used by english ex colonials who had moved to Scotland.

  25. #25
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    I like it that Indian newspapers still talk about 'the wee hours'.

    Some of the 'educated' Indians in Bombay sound like they belong in a Noel Coward play. It can be quite entertaining having at chat with these chaps.

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