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  1. #1
    Molecular Mixup
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    Larium: UK is to continue issuing a controversial anti-malarial to troops

    Oh great so the USA have banned it but Britain won't.

    I thought that drug had been done away with years ago, i took it on a holiday to Thailand over 20 years ago and it made me very ill indeed, dizzy and even passed out once = right in the middle of the hotel lobby ,
    my legs gave way and I mad the mistake of trying to get straight back up and then conked out all altogether - woke up to the stink of that menthol crap a Thai had kindly stuck in my face or something .
    I had to cut that holiday short.
    Almost 1,000 members of Armed Forces require psychiatric treatment after being given anti-Malaria drug linked to mental health problems

    Lariam has continued to be used despite evidence linking it to the 2012 Panjwai massacre, in which a US soldier slaughtered 17 Afghan civilians after taking the drug. Sergeant Robert Bales has since been sentenced to life imprisonment.

    In an internal report, Roche, the drug’s manufacturer, described the killings as an “adverse event.”
    In 2012, Dr Remington Nevin, a US Army epidemiologist whose research found the drug, also known as Mefloquine, could be toxic to the brain, told the Daily Mail: “Mefloquine is a zombie drug. It’s dangerous, and it should have been killed off years ago.”

    Mefloquin is used to treat malaria and was developed by Army re
    HALLUCINATIONS, SEIZURES AND DEPRESSION: WHAT IS MEFLOQUIN?




    Mefloquin is used to treat malaria and was developed by Army researchers towards the end of the Vietnam War.
    It gained support among the fighting forces because it works in areas where mosquitoes developed resistance to an earlier treatment, chloroquine, and requires just one tablet a week, not the daily dose needed with other medications.
    Side effects include seizures, depression, hallucinations, violent behaviour, feeling that others want to harm you, thoughts of hurting or killing yourself and many others.
    Almost four decades after inventing it, the U.S. Army pushed it to the back of its medicine cabinet.
    The about-face followed years of complaints and concerns that mefloquine caused psychiatric and physical side effects.
    In recent years, the Army slashed by almost 75 per cent the amount of mefloquine it prescribes, even as it sent thousands more soldiers to malaria-prone Afghanistan.
    Soldiers who had suffered from traumatic brain injuries were particularly advised against using it.
    'Mefloquine is a zombie drug. It's dangerous, and it should have been killed off years ago,' said Dr. Remington Nevin, an epidemiologist and Army major who has published research that he said showed the drug can be potentially toxic to the brain.


    searchers towards the end of the Vietnam War.
    It gained support among the fighting forces because it works in areas where mosquitoes developed resistance to an earlier treatment, chloroquine, and requires just one tablet a week, not the daily dose needed with other medications.
    Side effects include seizures, depression, hallucinations, violent behaviour, feeling that others want to harm you, thoughts of hurting or killing yourself and many others.
    Almost four decades after inventing it, the U.S. Army pushed it to the back of its medicine cabinet.
    The about-face followed years of complaints and concerns that mefloquine caused psychiatric and physical side effects.
    In recent years, the Army slashed by almost 75 per cent the amount of mefloquine it prescribes, even as it sent thousands more soldiers to malaria-prone Afghanistan.
    Soldiers who had suffered from traumatic brain injuries were particularly advised against using it.
    'Mefloquine is a zombie drug. It's dangerous, and it should have been killed off years ago,' said Dr. Remington Nevin, an epidemiologist and Army major who has published research that he said showed the drug can be potentially toxic to the brain.


  2. #2
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    Mefloquine is some bad stuff.

    I also took it years ago. It caused me memory loss or something. I couldn't remember how to spell simple words. My parents became worried because the letters I mailed them were childlike and their address was slightly incorrect in a different way on each letter.

    I went to the doctor in Chiang Mai to get more Mefloquine, not making the connection, and he asked me if I were having any kind of mental disturbances. Told him about what I was experiencing and he refused to give me more mefloquine. He said it would take a few weeks but the problem would go away. It did.

    It was a scary time.

  3. #3
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    The possible side effects shown on the label are enough warning to get off them.

    Only for exceptional circumstances for civilians now.

    Military will ban them.

    Seems if they were banned outright then folk would see a door open for
    compensation for the damage done.

    So best not to bother with them.

    Pharma bastards.

  4. #4
    Thailand Expat
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    Yes, I too had this in the past, caused some very odd dreams and mood swings.

  5. #5
    Thailand Expat
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    It's no wonder that so many ex service guys are well screwed up.

  6. #6
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    Malarone was recommended for me when I ventured to Laos in the rainy season as a prophylactic without the side effects associated with other older drugs. It still made me feel crap and I soon ditched them. Deet, common sense and covering up is the way to go.

  7. #7
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    Chemical warfare, only this time they are poisoning their own.

  8. #8
    Utopian Expat Chittychangchang's Avatar
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    I bought three months supply of the horrible stuff years ago for a trip to Africa.

    Started to affect my eyesight after a month so ditched it, never again.

  9. #9
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    Malarone. My doctor prescribed to me when i went to Mombassa. You had to take it for ten days before, then every day during your holiday and then for a week after you came home.

    I felt sick and dizzy after two days there. So stopped it. Also the tablets were huge so swallowing them was already a gag reflex.

    I did feel rather out of it too. Like i had taken an extasy. And not in the fun way!!

    And they are not cheap - if i remember rightly they cost around 150 quid. Which was not reimbursed on my health insurance.

    The second time i went to Mombassa, my whole family were up in arms because i didn't take the malarone with me. Sort of - "if you end up in hospital, we wipe our hands of you" i was fine.
    Last edited by patsycat; 26-05-2016 at 04:29 AM.

  10. #10
    Thailand Expat Pragmatic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by billy the kid
    It's no wonder that so many ex service guys are well screwed up.
    All medicines carry some form of side effects. In my military days we were given Paludrine.

  11. #11
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    I thought all military were given bromide.

  12. #12
    Thailand Expat Pragmatic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by patsycat
    I thought all military were given bromide.
    Only the ones living in barracks. It was put in the tea. I never noticed a decline in my sex drive and it definitely didn't prevent malaria. Only joking Patsy. No, Bromide wasn't put in servicemens tea. It's a myth.

  13. #13
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    Are these in the same general family ? Because you all need to be aware of them too :





    Study Reveals Neurological Damage from Antibiotics


    By Paul Fassa

    Realfarmacy.com

    The CDC has placed antibiotics and vaccines as the two most important medical breakthroughs of the 20th Century. That shows me how bad off the CDC and pharmaceutical medicine really are. Unfortunately, too many have been duped by “authority” once again.
    Here’s a horror movie feature: Have you ever heard of anyone burning from the inside out? It’s called Stevens-Johnson syndrome or SJS. This syndrome is gruesome. The whole body begins to blister to the point where an SJS victim needs to be treated as a burn victim. And it’s most often an adverse side effect of antibiotics.

    Dr. Joshua Zeichner, a dermatology professor at the Mount Sinai Hospital in Manhattan explained, “You’re not truly burned, but what happens is you have compromised the skin barrier function.” He explained that the epidermis separates from the dermis.


    Wonderful side effect, eh? Zeichner added that SJS reactions occur mostly from antibiotics, adding “Unfortunately, we have no way of predicting who would have this type of reaction.”


    Avoiding Minimal Damage from Antibiotics

    Most natural health advocates know that pharmaceutical antibiotics deplete digestion and immune system supporting probiotic bacteria, thus requiring some heavy probiotic supplementation or increased fermented food consumption.
    Basically, pharmaceutical antibiotics are like cancer chemotherapy drugs, they kill everything in site without discriminating between the good guys and bad guys. Even natural antibiotics like colloidal silver and grapefruit seed extract are not so discriminating.
    It’s recommended one maintain at least a maintenance amount of probiotic intake with fermented foods like sauerkraut or other fermented foods and home-made milk or water kefirs even while using natural antibiotics.Garlic may be an exception to this application of the precautionary principle.
    But pharmaceutical antibiotics are one to several steps worse than anything natural. Why do you think they have to be “safety tested”?
    Study Reveals Neurological Damage from Antibiotics

    Dr. Shamik Bhattacharyya of Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, MA, conducted a retrospective review using historical patient data. He found that links between antibiotics and delirium as well as other negative neurological conditions might be stronger than previously thought.
    The study analyzed 391 patients spanning a 70 year period who had taken antibiotics and suffered adverse neurological events, temporary and chronic. Many patients had hallucinations or delusions, some had seizures, others showed muscle twitching and limited control over their movements. Well over half the cases had abnormal EEG (electroencephalogram) tests, which measure brain’s electrical activity.
    According to Dr. Bhattacharyya, “The antibiotics react not only against the bacteria but also have ‘off-target’ effects by interfering with normal signaling within the brain. Different antibiotics affect the brain differently, hence causing varying patterns of toxicity.”
    Of course, many who took those antibiotics were not neurologically adversely affected. Again, we’re talking pharmaceuticals antibiotics. Even some penicillin antibiotics were culprits.
    Certain pharmaceuticals block the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, and almost all pharmaceutical antibiotics have an essentially similar effect. Natural antibiotics don’t do that. They don’t affect the nervous system.
    The Really Bad Guys: Fluoroquinolone Antibiotics

    Imagine trading a sinus or bladder infection for a life of extreme joint pain, torn tendons or ligaments, neurological issues, sleep deprivation, or long term paralysis. These and other iatrogenic (disease or death caused by medical interventions) conditions have occurred among many patients prescribed fluoroquinolone based antibiotics.
    Cipro, Levaquin, Tequin, Maxaquin, Avelox, Factive, Floxin, Noroxin, Penetrex, Zagam, as well as any other antibiotics that contain the words “flox” or “ox”, such as ciprofloxacin, levefloxacin and gatifloxacin.
    Some eye and ear drops also are FQ based, such as: Chibroxin(norfloxacin), Ocuflox(ofloxacin), Quixin(levofloxacin), Zymar(gatifloxacin), Ciloxan(ciprofloxacin), Floxin Otic (ofloxacin), Cipro Otic (ciprofloxacin). Some general anesthesia drugs may also contain fluoroquinolones.
    Make sure you know what’s in that stuff an anesthesiologist is about to use before you sign any waivers regarding your knowledge of the dangers involved.
    They are so dangerous they shouldn’t be prescribed at all, in my opinion. We’re not talking nausea or diarrhea type side effects. The side effects can be disastrous long term debilitating and painful diseases, including paralysis.
    The adverse effects from these antibiotics are often as severely neurological as the adverse effects of Gardasil and other vaccinations, with one exception, death. Apparently, no one has died directly from a fluoroquinolone antibiotic. But some have committed suicide to escape the extreme pain and paralysis.


    Fluoquinolone Antibiotic Victims On Their Own

    Fluoroquinolone antibiotic victims have been forced to go it alone via forums and social media on the internet. Just like vaccine injuries, mainstream medical practitioners don’t like to admit they just ruined someone’s life on behalf of Big Pharma.
    These victims consider their iatrogenic conditions as “floxed”, and they call themselves “floxxies”. The word flox is taken from Cipro*flox*acin. One victims’ group probably has the largest site for publicizing fluoroquinolone issues, advice, and case histories.
    This site also includes anecdotal advice for reversing floxed conditions naturally. It’s called Surviving Cipro.
    One thing is for sure, if you’ve been floxxed, don’t go running back to the same institution that put on fluoroquinolone antibiotics. They either don’t have solutions or will tell you it’s “all in your head”. Find naturopathic, homeopathic, osteopathic chiropractic, TCM or Ayurvedic practitioners to help you out.
    After enough blow back from the public and the PBS Frontline Report aired once, the FDA finally forced a “black box” warning on fluoroquinolone antibiotics. Black box warnings are meant for physicians’ eyes, which are not always open! Refuse any drug containing fluoroquinolones.


    EWAO Pharmaceutical Antibiotics Can Cause Horrific Side Effects

  14. #14
    Member stamford's Avatar
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    where can I buy?

  15. #15
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    Ciprofloxin et al are dirt cheap and do not make fortunes for the pharma companies since they are out of patent and produced and sold generically within any region. They are effective therapies in dealing with GIU/Bladder/Kidney infections having a broad spectrum application. All drugs have contra-indications and side effects but in the final analysis one has to balance risk with the desired outcome.

    Aspirin is a wonder drug but fucks up anyone with gastric vulnerabilities. You gonna ban it?

  16. #16
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    Hmmm...I don't think the side-effects from asprin are comparable to those from Cipro / Fluoroquinolones.

  17. #17
    Philippine Expat Davis Knowlton's Avatar
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    Used to hate the stuff we were forcefed in Vietnam. A daily white and a weekly orange - which was guaranteed to give you the shits if you didn't have them already.

    And during the year I got malaria anyhow.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Latindancer View Post
    Hmmm...I don't think the side-effects from asprin are comparable to those from Cipro / Fluoroquinolones.
    All depends really. Some take exception to perforated ulcers and intestinal haemorrhaging and others sail through......

    Statins are the most prescribed drug in the world yet 20% experience problems curtailing their use.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seekingasylum View Post
    Malarone was recommended for me when I ventured to Laos in the rainy season as a prophylactic without the side effects associated with other older drugs. It still made me feel crap and I soon ditched them. Deet, common sense and covering up is the way to go.
    Same here. If you are in the military can you refuse to take them?

  20. #20
    Philippine Expat Davis Knowlton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tj916 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Seekingasylum View Post
    Malarone was recommended for me when I ventured to Laos in the rainy season as a prophylactic without the side effects associated with other older drugs. It still made me feel crap and I soon ditched them. Deet, common sense and covering up is the way to go.
    Same here. If you are in the military can you refuse to take them?
    We took 'em, then spit them out when the medic moved on.....

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by tj916 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Seekingasylum View Post
    Malarone was recommended for me when I ventured to Laos in the rainy season as a prophylactic without the side effects associated with other older drugs. It still made me feel crap and I soon ditched them. Deet, common sense and covering up is the way to go.
    Same here. If you are in the military can you refuse to take them?
    In my experience, if the medic knows you don't take them, it's like a tattoo no problem if all goes well, if you are ill, it's a self inflicted wound = trouble, loss of leave, loss of pay etc

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