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  1. #1
    I am in Jail

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  • #2
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    Ah the dentally handicapped...

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    ^That would be the Brits, really.

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    Thailand Expat terry57's Avatar
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    Last week BBC aired a Doco on India's street dentists.

    Jesus fookin Christ, I near on fainted watching it.

  • #5
    R.I.P.

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    We have a fellow who comes to the Saturday night market here who does (repairs, makes) false teeth while you wait.

  • #6
    Thailand Expat terry57's Avatar
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    ^

    Those guys are in many places around Bangkok.

    Don't know whether they actually do extractions on the street though, don't think they do.

    That shit in India is mad stuff mate.

    Make King Kong cry.

  • #7
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    ChiangMai noon's Avatar
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  • #8
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    replacing missing teeth on plastic dentures is simple work and anybody with a good hand and a basic knowledge of the materials used can do it, however extracting teeth in a filthy environment using unclean and unsterilised equipment, as that indian butcher did, is nothing short of criminal. the chances of contracting blood born diseases including hiv and hepatitis are great, and his lack of the even the most basic of medical procedures was obvious in the way he reacted when the woman fainted after her tooth was pulled out.

    a faint like that is a loss of consciousness due to a sudden drop in blood pressure, in this case brought about by the shock and pain of the tooth extraction, and a person who faints should be laid down flat asap so that the head is as low as or at a lower level than the heart to encourage blood flow to the brain.



    the bangkok street dentists only undertake denture repair work, or at least that what the ones i asked told me when i enquired, but i have seen street dentists in both china and cambodia do extractions in exactly the same filthy and unhygienic conditions as the indian quack.

  • #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hans Mann View Post
    ^That would be the Brits, really.
    I beg to differ.
    Average no of missing or decayed teeth at 12 years of age (2008)
    Denmark, Luxemberg, UK. 0.7
    Sweden. 0.9
    Australia. 1.1
    US (2004). 1.3
    New Zealand, Norway. 1.4
    Japan. 1.5

    The myth of bad British teeth - BBC News

  • #10
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    From another source...

    More than one million British children under five have at least two fillings, new research suggests.

    The shocking statistic is one of many in a study highlighting the poor state of children's teeth.

    A staggering 17 per cent of mothers admit their child has at least three fillings - the study based their figures on children aged between two and 12.

    And 13 per cent of mums have children with at least one filling by the time they start school, at the age of four.

    What's more, 47 per cent of youngsters under 12 have been told they have dental decay.
    Nearly half of children have tooth decay - Telegraph

  • #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hans Mann View Post
    From another source...

    More than one million British children under five have at least two fillings, new research suggests.

    The shocking statistic is one of many in a study highlighting the poor state of children's teeth.

    A staggering 17 per cent of mothers admit their child has at least three fillings - the study based their figures on children aged between two and 12.

    And 13 per cent of mums have children with at least one filling by the time they start school, at the age of four.

    What's more, 47 per cent of youngsters under 12 have been told they have dental decay.
    Nearly half of children have tooth decay - Telegraph
    Diet, environment, and lifestyle.

  • #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hans Mann View Post
    From another source...

    More than one million British children under five have at least two fillings, new research suggests.

    The shocking statistic is one of many in a study highlighting the poor state of children's teeth.

    A staggering 17 per cent of mothers admit their child has at least three fillings - the study based their figures on children aged between two and 12.

    And 13 per cent of mums have children with at least one filling by the time they start school, at the age of four.

    What's more, 47 per cent of youngsters under 12 have been told they have dental decay.
    Nearly half of children have tooth decay - Telegraph
    You can take your article with its quotes from a dentist and a toothpaste manufacturer or the quote I gave from the WHO. Up to you

  • #13
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    Ancient Romans had less gum diseases than modern Brits

    Britons have worse oral health today than they did in Roman times despite the advent of toothbrushes and dentists, a study has found.

    A study of 303 skulls held at the Natural History Museum dating from the years 200 to 400 AD found only 5 per cent showed signs of moderate to severe gum disease (periodontitis), compared to about 15 to 30 per cent of adults today.

    The eight-page study was published in the British Dental Journal on Friday.

    While much of the population nowadays lives with mild gum disease, factors such as tobacco smoking or medical conditions like diabetes can trigger chronic periodontitis, which can lead to loss of teeth, the study said.

    King's College London (KCL) Dental Institute's Professor Francis Hughes, the study's lead author, said the findings were surprising.

    "We were very struck by the finding that severe gum disease appeared to be much less common in the Roman British population than in modern humans, despite the fact that they did not use toothbrushes or visit dentists as we do today," he said.

    "Gum disease has been found in our ancestors, including in mummified remains in Egypt, and was alluded to in writings by the Babylonians, Assyrians and Sumerians as well as the early Chinese."

    The skulls came from a Romano-British burial ground in Poundbury, south-west England.

    Despite the low rate of gum disease, many of the skulls showed signs of infections and abscesses and half had tooth decay.

    The skulls also showed extensive tooth wear from a young age, as would be expected from a diet rich in coarse grains and cereals at the time.

    "This study shows a major deterioration in oral health between Roman times and modern England," said Theya Molleson from the Natural History Museum, the study's co-author.

    "By underlining the probable role of smoking, especially in determining the susceptibility to progressive periodontitis in modern populations, there is a real sign that the disease can be avoided.

    "As smoking declines in the population we should see a decline in the prevalence of the disease."

    Britons have worse oral health today than in Roman times despite toothbrushes, dentists: study - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

  • #14
    Thailand Expat terry57's Avatar
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    Maybe someone can help me with this conundrum.

    Those little Jap Bastards

    Now the Japanese have a thoroughly advanced society with more money available than Donald Trump can muster yet so many of them have shit teeth.

    I just don't get it ?

    Whats up with that ?

  • #15
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    Sugar

  • #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by taxexile View Post
    replacing missing teeth on plastic dentures is simple work and anybody with a good hand and a basic knowledge of the materials used can do it, however extracting teeth in a filthy environment using unclean and unsterilised equipment, as that indian butcher did, is nothing short of criminal. the chances of contracting blood born diseases including hiv and hepatitis are great, and his lack of the even the most basic of medical procedures was obvious in the way he reacted when the woman fainted after her tooth was pulled out.

    a faint like that is a loss of consciousness due to a sudden drop in blood pressure, in this case brought about by the shock and pain of the tooth extraction, and a person who faints should be laid down flat asap so that the head is as low as or at a lower level than the heart to encourage blood flow to the brain.



    the bangkok street dentists only undertake denture repair work, or at least that what the ones i asked told me when i enquired, but i have seen street dentists in both china and cambodia do extractions in exactly the same filthy and unhygienic conditions as the indian quack.
    And what other option do poor people have?

  • #17
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    well, for a start they could buy a toothbrush and use it.

  • #18
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    You're making some big elitist assumptions there.

  • #19
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    In addition you should know that the need to brush one's teeth is a manufactured requirement more to do with the supposed tooth care industry than for any actual tooth health reason. Cut the sugar and you do not need a toothbrush or any of the ancillary crap. I am living proof of it, all you need do is once or twice per day to rinse the mouth with mouthwash.

  • #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Munted
    Cut the sugar and you do not need a toothbrush or any of the ancillary crap. I am living proof of it,
    Riiiiight.

  • #21
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    A strict diet of meat and leafy green vegetables does not cause tooth decay. And there is the added bonus that you will live longer than the sugar addicted.

  • #22
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    In addition you should know that the need to brush one's teeth is a manufactured requirement more to do with the supposed tooth care industry than for any actual tooth health reason. Cut the sugar and you do not need a toothbrush or any of the ancillary crap. I am living proof of it, all you need do is once or twice per day to rinse the mouth with mouthwash.
    people have been cleaning their teeth for thousands of years, long before any tooth care industry came into being, by using naturally found implements.

    nearly every food contains sugars that are converted to acid by the bacteria that occur naturally in the mouth, this acid slowly erodes the enamel of the teeth leading to plaque, caries and cavities. plaque adheres to the tooth surface and mouthwashing (which itself is a product of the tooth care industry, often containing strong chemical agents) is not enough to remove the plaque, and in fact all it does is to alter the balance of the bacterial flora present in the mouth, which is not a good thing.

    if you have never brushed your teeth, do you suffer from halitosis and periodontal disease?

  • #23
    Thailand Expat terry57's Avatar
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    I go for a professional clean every six months and also to keep on top of any potential problems.

    People can say want they want about dental hygiene but if one does not look after ones teeth one will be crying like a bitch when major work needs doing.

    Not to mention the cost.
    Stroller is a Yerman faggot.

  • #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by taxexile
    people have been cleaning their teeth for thousands of years, long before any tooth care industry came into being, by using naturally found implements.
    proof required

    Quote Originally Posted by taxexile
    nearly every food contains sugars that are converted to acid by the bacteria that occur naturally in the mouth
    possibly true this but in modern context much more than what occurs naturally.

    Quote Originally Posted by taxexile
    if you have never brushed your teeth, do you suffer from halitosis and periodontal disease?
    what's that? Admittedly bad breath can be a problem but much less so with products which eliminate it.
    Last edited by Munted; 16-11-2015 at 01:12 PM.

  • #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by terry57
    if one does not look after ones teeth one will be crying like a bitch when major work needs doing.
    Never had the need Terry to feed the exorbitant demands from the dental industry. I live by the motto of 'cultivate the bitter', yes it is tough to give up on a lifetime of sugar addiction but it can be done with a bit of willpower and perserverence.

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