Page 79 of 83 FirstFirst ... 296971727374757677787980818283 LastLast
Results 1,951 to 1,975 of 2061
  1. #1951
    Thailand Expat
    OhOh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 11:57 PM
    Location
    Where troubles melt like lemon drops
    Posts
    15,766
    ^Not at all. Seeking clarification on actual costs.

    So far I have found an ameristani government budget which indicated certain figures, some marketing blurb from spacex, some alleged spacex winning bid figures and an announcement from Russian launchers of their own launch costs.

    There is some muddying of waters due allegedly that some launches require higher charges to cover "certification" at a higher level or possibly free insurance covers the 'B' grade, dodgy launches. Spacex's figures were / are based on multiple usage of engines/??? which appears not to be happening now .

    But there appears to be ample wriggle room between what ameristani government budgets us$150,000,000 + and 60,000,000 costs for brown envelopes to keep the illusion profitable and undocumented. I'm sure everybody is happy paying ameristan MIC missile, satellite, radar and national security development fees, even foreigners.

    Unless you have any facts to share alongside your immature sniggering?

    A tray full of GOLD is not worth a moment in time.

  2. #1952
    Thailand Expat
    Takeovers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Last Online
    Today @ 05:00 AM
    Location
    Berlin Germany
    Posts
    5,383
    Quote Originally Posted by David48atTD View Post
    Maybe someone has a better clip?
    Depends on what you want to see. This is probably the best collection of spectacular optical impressions.

    Launches at dusk, like this one or dawn produce these spectacular views. Because at the ground it is dark and at altitude the rocket exhaust is illuminated by the sun.

    Another good one.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=sEaTe38-I4Y

    Here a slightly more conventional video of launch and return of the first stage. This was the first launch at the West Coast, Vandenberg Airforce Base, with return of the first stage to the launch site. They had to overcome concerns about scaring seals with the sonic boom when coming down.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=eNdVTuvtENU
    "don't attribute to malice what can be adequately explained by incompetence"

  3. #1953
    Thailand Expat David48atTD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Last Online
    Today @ 05:47 AM
    Location
    Palace Far from Worries
    Posts
    6,046
    ^ Cool

  4. #1954
    Thailand Expat
    Takeovers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Last Online
    Today @ 05:00 AM
    Location
    Berlin Germany
    Posts
    5,383
    It has happened.

    A manned Soyuz launch failed. The crew is safe fortunately. The capsule separated and landed safely. Rescue teams have got them out of the landed capsule, apparently in good shape.

    As I mentioned in the drama around the bored hole in a Soyuz orbital module, quality control is slipping and it seems the slips have now reached the manned Soyuz flights. We will see what that means in context of ISS operations. More info when it becomes available.

  5. #1955
    Thailand Expat
    Takeovers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Last Online
    Today @ 05:00 AM
    Location
    Berlin Germany
    Posts
    5,383
    Ongoing coverage at NASA TV.

    https://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/#public

    Reporting on space.com

    https://www.space.com/42097-soyuz-ro...n-57-crew.html

    A Russian Soyuz rocket carrying a new U.S.-Russian crew to the International Space Station failed during its ascent Thursday (Oct. 11), sending its crew capsule falling back toward Earth in a ballistic re-entry, NASA officials said. A search-and-rescue team has reached the landing site, both crewmembers are in good condition and have left the Soyuz capsule as of 6:10 a.m. EDT, NASA spokesperson Brandi Dean said during live television commentary.

    The Soyuz rocket and its Soyuz MS-10 space capsule lifted off from Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan at about 4:47 a.m. EDT (0847 GMT) with NASA astronaut Nick Hague and cosmonaut Aleksey Ovchinin aboard. The pair were due to join the three-person Expedition 57 crew already aboard the International Space Station. But something went wrong minutes after liftoff, sending the Soyuz capsule into a ballistic re-entry, NASA officials said.

    "Confirming again that the today's Soyuz MS10 launch did go into a ballistic re-entry mode
    around 3:47 a.m Central Time (4:47 a.m. EDT/0847 GMT)," Dean said during live television commentary. "That means the crew will not be going to the International Space Station today. Instead they'll be taking a sharp landing, coming back to Earth." NASA is providing live commentary on NASA TV, which you can watch here.



    The three astronauts currently on board the space station have been informed of the failed launch and their schedule for the day is being reshuffled, since they'll no longer be able to greet the incoming duo. Mission control told current station commander Alexander Gerst of the European Space Agency that during landing, "the boys" experienced forces of about 6.7 G in a call that NASA later broadcast on the live commentary.

    The pair landed about 20 kilometers (12 miles) east of Dzhezkazgan, Kazakhstan. "Search and rescue crews are always pre-staged in the event something like this does happen," Dean added. Helicopters have already dispatched to look for the Soyuz space capsule, she said.

  • #1956
    Thailand Expat
    OhOh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 11:57 PM
    Location
    Where troubles melt like lemon drops
    Posts
    15,766
    Here is a report released covering any insurance payment for the failed launch

    It suggests a 4.66 bln rubles ($70.2 mln) figure.

    TASS: Emergencies - Insurance payment on failed Soyuz launch to become one of biggest over past decades

  • #1957
    Member
    harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    Today @ 02:11 AM
    Posts
    53,837
    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    ^Not at all. Seeking clarification on actual costs.

    So far I have found an ameristani government budget which indicated certain figures, some marketing blurb from spacex, some alleged spacex winning bid figures and an announcement from Russian launchers of their own launch costs.

    There is some muddying of waters due allegedly that some launches require higher charges to cover "certification" at a higher level or possibly free insurance covers the 'B' grade, dodgy launches. Spacex's figures were / are based on multiple usage of engines/??? which appears not to be happening now .

    But there appears to be ample wriggle room between what ameristani government budgets us$150,000,000 + and 60,000,000 costs for brown envelopes to keep the illusion profitable and undocumented. I'm sure everybody is happy paying ameristan MIC missile, satellite, radar and national security development fees, even foreigners.

    Unless you have any facts to share alongside your immature sniggering?

    I'l rely on Takeovers. He knows his subject and quotes authoritative circles.

    You, on the other hand, are a dim sycophant who publishes any old piece of pro-Russia or Pro-chinky propaganda because you're too stupid to understand.

  • #1958
    Member
    harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    Today @ 02:11 AM
    Posts
    53,837
    Mere days after the Hubble Space Telescope entered safe mode following a component failure, NASA said its Chandra X-ray Observatory entered safe mode on Wednesday. The space agency said on Friday that an investigation into the incident is currently underway, though it added data analysis indicated the safe mode transition to be “normal behavior.”


    Chandra has been precision X-raying our universe since its launch in 1999 and is one of four observatories of NASA’s Great Observatory program, which includes the Hubble Space Telescope, Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, and Spitzer Space Telescope. The observatory spies on objects that include black holes, galaxies, supernovas, high-temperature gases, and quasars throughout the x-ray portion of the electromagnetic spectrum to help us better understand the universe.

    The incredible spacecraft boasts what NASA
    describes as “the largest, most precisely shaped and aligned, and smoothest mirrors ever constructed,” and it is currently among the most powerful telescopes in the world. Chandra entered a safe configuration early Wednesday in order to protect itself during the issue, which NASA said may have involved a gyroscope. Such was the case last week with the beloved Hubble Space Telescope, which went into safe mode after another of its six gyroscopes failed.


    “Analysis of available data indicates the transition to safe mode was normal behavior for such an event,” NASA
    said. “All systems functioned as expected and the scientific instruments are safe.”


    The 19-year-old Chandra has far outlived its 5-year original design lifetime. After the issue is resolved, Chandra’s mission is expected to continue “for many years to come,” the space agency said.


    Grant Tremblay, an astrophysicist at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, tweeted Friday that the issue with Chandra had been characterized and that there was a “clear pathway to recovery.” He added that Chandra is safe and expected to return to its mission soon.

    https://gizmodo.com/just-days-after-...ory-1829730915

  • #1959
    Thailand Expat
    Takeovers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Last Online
    Today @ 05:00 AM
    Location
    Berlin Germany
    Posts
    5,383
    Gyroscopes are life limiting devices for many probes. Hubble had the gyroscopes replaced in a previous repair mission flown by the Space Shuttle. Also Hubble like Chandra and many others are way beyond their design life limits.

    But as mentioned, Chandra can continue working until more Gyroscopes fail. The same is true for Hubble. It has 2 remaining Gyroscopes if they can not get the failed one to operate again. Hubble can operate on one gyro but there are some observations it can no longer do because Hubble can not trace every region of the sky that way.

  • #1960
    Thailand Expat
    OhOh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 11:57 PM
    Location
    Where troubles melt like lemon drops
    Posts
    15,766
    On the previous page you showed some new rockets. The newer and larger one, BFR, don't appear to use the detachable boosters. Any reasons, I would have thought disposing of used tank/ engines as soon as possible would be a benefit.

  • #1961
    Thailand Expat
    Takeovers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Last Online
    Today @ 05:00 AM
    Location
    Berlin Germany
    Posts
    5,383
    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    On the previous page you showed some new rockets. The newer and larger one, BFR, don't appear to use the detachable boosters. Any reasons, I would have thought disposing of used tank/ engines as soon as possible would be a benefit.
    BFR is supposed to be a fully reusable launch vehicle, with emphasis on FULLY. Nothing gets dropped that needs to be replaced except fuel. It launches, returns to the launch site and flies again a few hours later. That's the design goal. Though it will take a while until they reach this goal.

    Though it is hard to believe even to me, they are planning commercial airline like operations where the vehicle flies maybe 10 times a day between major cities at prices many can afford. Business class ticket price or lower. Which will need airline like safety. As Elon Musk said, if the ticket states: 35 minutes from New York to Shanghai, but you may die, few would fly.

  • #1962
    Thailand Expat
    Takeovers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Last Online
    Today @ 05:00 AM
    Location
    Berlin Germany
    Posts
    5,383
    Last night BepiColombo was launched on an Ariane 5 rocket. It is an ESA mission. The probe will reach orbit around Mercury in Dec 25 as shown in this YouTube video if everything goes well. Though it launched a few days late so it may shift a little.

    The flight trajectory is extremely complicated as it is very hard to reach Mercury. It is not far but a very high delta-v is required to reach it so besides an ion drive many flybys are needed to shed speed. First one on earth, then twice Venus then 6 flybys of Mercury before orbit can be achieved. The ion drive uses 580kg of Xenon gas. For comparison world production of Xenon a year is 600kg, so it is a lot.


  • #1963
    Thailand Expat
    OhOh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 11:57 PM
    Location
    Where troubles melt like lemon drops
    Posts
    15,766
    NASA chief believes human mission to Mars should become international project



    NASA chief Jim Bridenstine


    © AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin


    WASHINGTON, October 19. /TASS/.
    “The US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) will be unable to implement a program for sending a manned mission to Mars, its chief, Jim Bridenstine, told TASS in an interview. A little more than a week ago Bridenstine was in Moscow and the Baikonur space site in Kazakhstan and for the first time met with his Russian counterpart, chief of the Roscosmos corporation Dmitry Rogozin.

    "We want that to be an international collaborative project," he said.

    According to Bridenstine, the United States is developing "an architecture on the Moon, that same architecture when we think about launch providers and spacecraft and reusable command modules and landers and launch ascent vehicles, that could take off from the surface of the Moon."

    "All of these capabilities and technologies can be replicated on Mars. We are interested in assessing international partners that can build these capabilities. The United States of America cannot do everything, but if we have international partners that can participate in parts of architecture, then we can do more, then we could ever do alone. I don’t know exactly what country will be part of which part of the architecture, but I do know, that if each country does it’s part we can do more, that we could ever do alone."

    According to earlier reports NASA plans the first manned flight to the red planet in the 2030s using a newly-designed spacecraft Orion and heavy rocket SLS. Before an Orion can be launched to Mars, though, several unmanned probes are to be sent to Mars to identify a suitable site where a capsule with astronauts might land”

    More:
    TASS: Science & Space - NASA chief believes human mission to Mars should become international project

    Attached Images Attached Images

  • #1964
    Thailand Expat
    Takeovers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Last Online
    Today @ 05:00 AM
    Location
    Berlin Germany
    Posts
    5,383
    There are just 2 options for Mars. SpaceX is going there, or nobody is going there. Any kind of international cooperation would be wildly complex and wildly expensive. Not going to happen.

    Wildcard being the Chinese. They may go in 20-30 years.

  • #1965
    Thailand Expat
    Dragonfly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 05:17 PM
    Posts
    8,766
    without VonBraun, mission to mars will never happen

    NASA is full of politics and petty administrators, it's doomed

  • #1966
    Member SoiNongbua's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    The Yellow Brick Road
    Posts
    56
    Quote Originally Posted by Dragonfly View Post
    without VonBraun, mission to mars will never happen

    NASA is full of politics and petty administrators, it's doomed
    I worked in the commercial satellite launch business and literally have spent YEARS at the Cosmodrome in Baikonur, KZ.
    I saw several Soyuz launches from way UP CLOSE, although I was always working on Proton heavy lift launches, which occur at a different part of the massive Cosmodrome. I did get to meet some of the astronauts/cosmonauts who flew the Soyuz missions. Great guys.

    Can't say the same for the huge NASA entourage which accompanies every manned launch. Egotistical, self-righteous, pompous jerks every last one. They always stayed at the same hotel--the Sputnik--in tiny Baikonur, where my team often stayed.

    The NASA clowns were, from what I saw, a bunch of drunks with little regard for others. They tore up the hotel every time they had a party, which was often. Bunch of ticket punchers.
    Last edited by SoiNongbua; 21-10-2018 at 08:59 PM.

  • #1967
    Thailand Expat
    aging one's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 10:20 PM
    Posts
    16,419
    Quote Originally Posted by SoiNongbua View Post
    Can't say the same for the huge NASA entourage which accompanies every manned launch. Egotistical, self-righteous, pompous jerks every last one. They always stayed at the same hotel--the Sputnik--in tiny Baikonur, where my team often stayed.

    The NASA ass clowns were, from what I saw, a bunch of drunks with little regard for others. They tore the sh*t out of the hotel every time they had a party, which was often. Bunch of ticket punchers.
    What has caused you to erupt today culminating in this bit??

  • #1968
    Thailand Expat Luigi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Last Online
    Today @ 05:47 AM
    Location
    Abuja
    Posts
    19,836
    Not really news, but interesting enough read about a 17 year old girl training to be on Nasa's first mission to Mars.

    https://secretsofuniverse.in/2018/08...human-on-mars/

  • #1969
    Thailand Expat
    OhOh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 11:57 PM
    Location
    Where troubles melt like lemon drops
    Posts
    15,766


    A photo of the launch of a Chinese rocket.

    China launches ocean-observing satellite under closer Sino-EU space cooperation - People's Daily Online

    There appears to be a lot of "debris" falling off during the launch. I presume it's ice or the like, due to the fuel temperature. Surely it affects the stability at a crucial time?
    Attached Images Attached Images

  • #1970
    Custom Title Changer
    CSFFan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Last Online
    14-12-2018 @ 11:41 PM
    Location
    Bangkok
    Posts
    7,564
    Quote Originally Posted by Luigi View Post
    Not really news, but interesting enough read about a 17 year old girl training to be on Nasa's first mission to Mars. https://secretsofuniverse.in/2018/08...human-on-mars/
    I'd have killed to be able to do what she's done. Very, seriously fucking impressive young lady.

  • #1971
    Thailand Expat
    Takeovers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Last Online
    Today @ 05:00 AM
    Location
    Berlin Germany
    Posts
    5,383
    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    There appears to be a lot of "debris" falling off during the launch. I presume it's ice or the like, due to the fuel temperature. Surely it affects the stability at a crucial time?
    I have read a few days ago that they have styrofoam covering the payload fairing that falls off on launch. Not dangerous. Ice falls off the tanks, especially the tanks for LOX, liquid oxygen on many rockets. Also not dangerous. While on the pad the ice forms as frost and is an additional insulating layer, or the only one.

  • #1972
    Member
    harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    Today @ 02:11 AM
    Posts
    53,837
    NASA’s most prolific planet-hunter is powering down after nearly a decade of revealing the diversity of our galaxy’s planets.

    The Kepler space telescope will be retired after running out of fuel nine years after its initial launch, the space agency announced Tuesday. But the innovative spacecraft enjoyed an illustrious career, discovering as many as 2,600 planets and inspiring new fields of research, NASA said. Among its chief insights: that planets far outnumber stars.

    “As NASA’s first planet-hunting mission, Kepler has wildly exceeded all our expectations and paved the way for our exploration and search for life in the solar system and beyond,” said Thomas Zurbuchen of NASA’s Science Mission Directorate. “Its discoveries have shed a new light on our place in the universe, and illuminated the tantalizing mysteries and possibilities among the stars.”


    The probe’s retirement was not unexpected. Kepler has been
    running out of fuel for months, according to Space.com. In the lead-up to its impending retirement, “scientists pushed Kepler to its full potential” by preemptively powering down the spacecraft several times to extend its lifespan. It will be deactivated while in its current orbit of the sun, far from Earth, NASA said.


    Launched in March 2009, the $600 million Kepler mission searched the night sky for
    Earth-like planets using what’s called the “transit method.” The probe’s camera measured changes in the brightness of 150,000 stars in one patch of sky to identify alien planets, including ones that could potentially be inhabited by humans.


    In 2013,
    mechanical errors made Kepler too unstable to continue its precision surveys. But scientists came up with a workaround, “K2,” that pivoted the probe’s field of view every three months and allowed it to survey more than 500,000 stars.


    Over the course of its nine years, Kepler identified
    2,662 planets and 61 supernovae on just 3.12 gallons of fuel. Its discoveries also supported nearly 3,000 scientific papers. Scientists said that Kepler’s data will support further research for a decade to come.


    “We know the spacecraft’s retirement isn’t the end of Kepler’s discoveries,” said Jessie Dotson, Kepler’s project scientist at NASA’s Ames Research Center in California. “I’m excited about the diverse discoveries that are yet to come.”

    NASA Kepler Space Telescope Retires After Years of Discovery | Time

  • #1973
    Thailand Expat
    Takeovers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Last Online
    Today @ 05:00 AM
    Location
    Berlin Germany
    Posts
    5,383
    Fortunately the successor is already in place. TESS is expected to find a huge number of planets. The method is to detect changes of brightness of the star while a planet passes in front of it. This method can only find planets that move in a plane that let's them pass in front of their sun but there are a huge number to find still.

    https://www.nasa.gov/content/about-tess

    About TESS


    This is a conceptual image of the TESS mission
    Credits: MIT



    The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) is the next step in the search for planets outside of our solar system, including those that could support life. The mission will find exoplanets that periodically block part of the light from their host stars, events called transits. TESS will survey 200,000 of the brightest stars near the sun to search for transiting exoplanets. TESS launched on April 18, 2018, aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket.
    TESS scientists expect the mission will catalog thousands of planet candidates and vastly increase the current number of known exoplanets. Of these, approximately 300 are expected to be Earth-sized and super-Earth-sized exoplanets, which are worlds no larger than twice the size of Earth. TESS will find the most promising exoplanets orbiting our nearest and brightest stars, giving future researchers a rich set of new targets for more comprehensive follow-up studies.
    Mission Approach
    TESS will survey the entire sky over the course of two years by breaking it up into 26 different sectors, each 24 degrees by 96 degrees across. The powerful cameras on the spacecraft will stare at each sector for at least 27 days, looking at the brightest stars at a two-minute cadence. From Earth, the moon occupies half a degree, which is less than 1/9,000th the size of the TESS tiles.
    The stars TESS will study are 30 to 100 times brighter than those the Kepler mission and K2 follow-up surveyed, which will enable far easier follow-up observations with both ground-based and space-based telescopes. TESS will also cover a sky area 400 times larger than that monitored by Kepler.
    In addition to its search for exoplanets, TESS will allow scientists from the wider community to request targets for astrophysics research on approximately 20,000 additional objects during the mission through its Guest Investigator program.
    The Transit Method

    This animation shows how a dip in the observed brightness of a star may indicate the presence of a planet passing in front of it, an occurrence known as a transit.
    Credits: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center



    The transit method of detecting exoplanets looks for dips in the visible light of stars, and requires that planets cross in front of stars along our line of sight to them. Repetitive, periodic dips can reveal a planet or planets orbiting a star. Transit photometry, which looks at how much light an object puts out at any given time, can tell researchers a lot about a planet. Based on how much of a dip in light a planet causes in its star, we can determine that planet’s size. Looking at how long it takes a planet to orbit its star, scientists are able to determine the shape of the planet’s orbit and how long it takes the planet to circle its sun.
    TESS will create a catalog of thousands of exoplanet candidates using this transit photometry method. After this list has been compiled, the TESS mission will conduct ground-based follow-up observations to confirm that the exoplanets candidates are true exoplanets and not false positives. These ground-based telescopes will collaborate with other ground-based telescopes to measure the masses of the planets. Using the known planet size, orbit and mass, TESS and ground-based follow-up will be able to determine the planets’ compositions. This will reveal whether the planets are rocky (like Earth), gas giants (like Jupiter) or something even more unusual. Additional follow-up with ground- and space-based missions, including NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope, will also allow astronomers to study the atmospheres of many of these planets.
    TESS team partners include the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, MIT’s Lincoln Laboratory, Orbital ATK, NASA’s Ames Research Center, the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, and the Space Telescope Science Institute.

  • #1974
    Member
    harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    Today @ 02:11 AM
    Posts
    53,837
    Quote Originally Posted by Takeovers View Post
    Fortunately the successor is already in place.
    I know but it's still sad when we lose a spacecraft.

    In the old days of the shuttle they could just pop up and fill the tank.


  • #1975
    Thailand Expat
    Takeovers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Last Online
    Today @ 05:00 AM
    Location
    Berlin Germany
    Posts
    5,383
    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    In the old days of the shuttle they could just pop up and fill the tank.
    Yes, they did such things with the Hubble space telescope. Each of these missions was more expensive than sending a new telescope.

    Also the Shuttle would not be capable of reaching Kepler. It is in an earth trailing solar orbit quite far from earth.

  • Thread Information

    Users Browsing this Thread

    There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •