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  1. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Lick
    Put on red-blue glasses to get the 3-D effect.
    Damn. Where did I put those.

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    I must get stereo glasses, to look at those.

    The rover scientist team will live with the martian day of 24h 39m 34,244s. They comunicate with Curiosity mainly during the mars night to program her tasks for the next day so their workday has to adjust.

  3. #53
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    Nasa's new Mars landing craft Morpheus bursts into flames on take-off

    Proving what a feat of engineering the Curiosity rover truly was, Nasa's latest Mars landing project Morpheus is seen bursting into flames during a test at Kennedy Space Centre.

    8:14AM BST 10 Aug 2012

    Nasa has enjoyed great success with its Curiosity landing craft in recent days but their plans to launch another space rover were brought down to earth with a fiery bump at the Kennedy Space Centre.

    During a so-called autonomous free-flight test, Nasa said the vehicle lifted off the ground successfully but "then experienced a hardware component failure, which prevented it from maintaining stable flight."

    No one was injured in the accident, which followed nearly a year of testing on Morpheus.

    Nasa TV footage showed the space capsule engulfed almost totally in flames after the crash, with little left to salvage.

    TheUS space agency said engineers were looking into test data to determine the exact cause of Thursday's accident, but further details were not immediately available.

    The accident came as Nasa scientists were still hailing the Mars rover Curiosity's decent and landing on the Red Planet earlier this week as a "miracle of engineering.

    ( for video click on link )


    Video: Nasa's new Mars landing craft Morpheus bursts into flames on take-off - Telegraph

  4. #54
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    Record-breaking galaxy cluster churns out 740 stars a year



    Astronomers have identified a record-breaking galaxy cluster that churns out stars from its centre faster than any cluster ever spotted.


    The Phoenix cluster, which was first sighted by the South Pole Telescope in 2010, appears to be generating around 740 new stars a year from its central galaxy -- an astonishing feat when you consider our humble Milky Way produces only one or two in the same period.


    "This extreme rate of star formation was really unexpected," said Michael McDonald, a Hubble Fellow at MIT and the lead author of a paper detailing the discovery. "It's nearly five times higher than the next most star-forming central-cluster galaxy, in Abell 1835. So it's really crushing the record."


    Phoenix, which appears in a constellation some 5.7 billion light years from Earth, does not rest there with its record-smashing feats -- it also produces more X-rays than any other known cluster and appears to have the largest rate of hot gas cooling in its centre, a fact that adds weight to the argument that star formation relies heavily on this cooling process.


    Record-breaking galaxy cluster churns out 740 stars a year (Wired UK)
    Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside in a cloud of smoke, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming "Wow! What a Ride!"

  5. #55
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    US astronaut Neil Armstrong dies, first man on Moon


    US astronaut Neil Armstrong, the first man on the Moon, has died aged 82.

    A statement from his family says he died from complications from heart surgery he had earlier this month.

    He set foot on the Moon on 20 July 1969, famously describing the event as "one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind".

    US President Barack Obama said Armstrong was "among the greatest of American heroes - not just of his time, but of all time".

    Last November he received the Congressional Gold Medal, the highest US civilian award.

    He was the commander of the Apollo 11 spacecraft. More than 500 million TV viewers around the world watched its touchdown on the lunar surface.

    Armstrong and fellow astronaut Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin spent nearly three hours walking on the moon, collecting samples, conducting experiments and taking photographs.

    "The sights were simply magnificent, beyond any visual experience that I had ever been exposed to," Armstrong once said.



    The BBC's Pallab Ghosh, who interviewed Armstrong, says he had an ''ice cool attitude'' which made him an excellent astronaut

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    We already have a Neil Armstrong died thread, someone else has bumped the famous dead people thread then you've repeated the same 'news' a third time in this thread.

  7. #57
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    It's for those that perhaps don't visit all threads on TD, SW. Great men deserve recognition especially at a time of passing. Neil Armstrong was one of those men.

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    You're worried that they'll miss the news? CNN, BBC, Al Jazeera have got that covered, I think.

  9. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Lick
    Neil Armstrong was one of those men.
    you are assuming he really went to the Moon,

  10. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Lick
    "The first impression that you get is how Earthlike this seems, looking at that landscape," said Caltech's John Grotzinger, chief scientist for the $2.5 billion mission. "You would really be forgiven for thinking that NASA was trying to pull a fast one on you, and we actually put a rover out in the Mojave Desert and took a picture."
    Quote Originally Posted by Butterfly
    you are assuming he really went to the Moon,
    same old story

  11. #61
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    The Dawn mission

    Somehow it completely escaped my attention, that there is a probe out to go to the biggest asteroids and circle them for observation.

    Dawn circled Vesta for more than a year and is now leaving for a 2,5 year flight to reach Ceres, another huge asteroid.

    Here is a video assembled from a huge number of photos taken. Well worth looking at, if possible in full screen.

    I wonder if the stars were really on those photos but suspect they were added on the computer.

    For some reason the link does not embed but clicking on it will get you to the youtube video.

    Dawn's Farewell Portrait of Giant Asteroid Vesta - YouTube


    For comparison here the best pictures that can be taken by the Hubble Space Telescope.

    Last edited by Takeovers; 01-09-2012 at 10:40 PM.

  12. #62
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    A guided tour through the ISS. A must see for anybody who is interested in the Space Station. With all modules of the station. The russian part looks distinctly different.

    ESA astronaut André Kuipers' tour of the International Space Station - YouTube

    Again it does not embed, but the link works fine.

  13. #63
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    NASA's Cassini orbiter captured this view of Saturn on June 15, from a distance of about 1.8 million miles (2.9 million kilometers). The rings' shadow runs across the planet's sunlit side. The speck in the lower left corner is Enceladus, a 313-mile-wide (504-kilometer-wide) moon of Saturn.

    NASA's Cassini sent back this big, beautiful, black-and-white picture of Saturn — but what's that little white speck in the corner?

    The image, unveiled by Cassini's imaging team on Monday, shows tiny Enceladus at lower left. It's just 313 miles wide (504 kilometers wide), and yet it shines brightly from a distance of 2 million miles or so. Enceladus is arguably as intriguing as Saturn, and here's why: The icy moon has geysers of water spouting up from cracks in its surface, suggesting that there's a deep ocean and perhaps even some sort of life down below.

    To get a more imaginative view of Enceladus, check out this posting on the io9 blog, featuring an illustration from "Planetfall: New Solar System Visions," a big, beautiful, full-color coffee-table book by Michael Benson. NPR's Robert Krulwich showed off the same image earlier this month on his Krulwich Wonders blog.

    Enceladus is just one of the moons of the solar system that's been soaking up the spotlight lately: Also this month, NASA's Curiosity rover watched Mars' two moons, Phobos and Deimos, pass over the sun's disk during a series of mini-eclipses. The rover won't see such a sight again for 11 months or so. Here's a smooth animation of Deimos' transit from Nahum Chazarra on UnmannedSpaceflight.com. And if you haven't seen it already, you'll want to catch up with the sight of a crescent Phobos in Mars' dusky sky.

  14. #64
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    Planet with four suns disovered




    Astronomers have found a planet whose skies are illuminated by four different suns - the first known of its type.

    The distant world orbits one pair of stars and has a second stellar pair revolving around it.

    It remains a mystery how the Neptune-like world avoids being pulled apart by the gravitational forces generated its four stars.

    The find was made by volunteers using the Planethunters.org website along with a team from UK and US institutes.

    A scientific paper outlining the quadruple star system has been posted on the Arxiv pre-print server.

    The planet, located just under 5,000 light-years away, has been named PH1 after the Planet Hunters site.

    It is thought to be a "gas giant" slightly larger than Neptune but over six times the size of the Earth.

    "You don't have to go back too far before you would have got really good odds against one of these systems existing," Dr Chris Lintott, from the University of Oxford, told BBC News.

    "All four stars pulling on it creates a very complicated environment. Yet there it sits in an apparently stable orbit.

    That's really confusing, which is one of the things which makes this discovery so fun. It's absolutely not what we would have expected."

    Binary stars - systems with pairs of stars - are not uncommon. But only a handful of the planets have been found to orbit such binaries. And none of these are known to have another pair of stars circling them.

    On how the planet survives without being pulled apart, Dr Lintott said: "There are six other well-established planets around double stars, and they're all pretty close to those stars. So I think what this is telling us is planets can form in the inner parts of protoplanetary discs (the torus of dense gas that gives rise to planetary systems).

    "The planets are forming close in and able to cling to a stable orbit there. That probably has implications for how planets form elsewhere."

    PH1 was discovered by two US volunteers using the Planethunters.org website: Kian Jek of San Francisco and Robert Gagliano from Cottonwood, Arizona.

    They spotted faint dips in light caused by the planet passing in front of its parent stars. The team of professional astronomers then confirmed the discovery using the Keck telescopes on Mauna Kea, Hawaii.

    Founded in 2010, Planethunters.org aims to harness human pattern recognition to identify transits in publicly available data gathered by Nasa's Kepler Space Telescope.

    Kepler was launched in March 2009 to search for Earth-like planets orbiting other stars.

    Visitors to the Planet Hunters website have access to randomly selected data from one of Kepler's target stars.

    Volunteers are asked to draw boxes to mark the locations of visible transits - when a planet passes in front of its parent star. Since December 2010, more than 170,000 members of the public have participated in the project.

  15. #65
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    Exoplanet around Alpha Centauri is nearest-ever



    Astronomers have found the nearest planet outside our Solar System, circling one of the stars of Alpha Centauri just four light-years away.

    The planet has at minimum the same mass as Earth, but circles its star far closer than Mercury orbits our Sun.

    It is therefore outside the "habitable zone" denoting the possibility of life, as the researchers report in Nature.

    However, studies on exoplanets increasingly show that a star with one planet is likely to have several.

    At the very least, the work answers the question first posed in ancient times about planets around our nearest stellar neighbours.

    The closest star to the Sun is Proxima Centauri, which is believed to be part of a three-star system that includes the brighter stars Alpha Centauri A and B.

    The planet was found near Alpha Centauri B by the Harps instrument at the European Southern Observatory's La Silla facility in Chile.

    That puts it far closer to Earth than any of the more than 840 confirmed exoplanets

    Like a dance between one enormous and one tiny partner, as an exoplanet orbits its much larger host star, its gravity causes the star to move in a small orbit.

    Harps and instruments like it measure the subtle change in colour - the redshift or blueshift - of the host star's light as its orbit moves it slightly closer to and further away from Earth.


    What has delayed this finding is that because Alpha Centauri is itself a complicated system of stars orbiting one another, the effect of a comparatively tiny planet is difficult to detect.
    What is redshift?


    • The term "redshift" arises from the fact that light from more distant objects shows up on Earth more red than when it left its source
    • The colour shift comes about because of the Doppler effect, which acts to "stretch" or "compress" waves from moving objects
    • It is at work in the sound of a moving siren: an approaching siren sounds higher-pitched and a receding one sounds lower-pitched
    • In the case of light, approaching objects appear more blue and receding objects appear more red
    • The expansion of the Universe is accelerating, so in general, more distant objects are moving away from us (and each other, and everything else) more quickly than nearer ones
    • Exoplanet hunters use the same red- and blueshift of stars' light as evidence of planets tugging on them

    But careful measurements over four years showed that the planet whips around Alpha Centauri B in just 3.6 days, and is estimated to have a surface temperature of about 1,200C.

    Many planets in similar orbits are "tidally locked", meaning the same side is always facing the host star, but further observations will be required to examine the planet further, finding out for example if it has an atmosphere.

    Since the very first planets outside our solar system were discovered in the early 1990s, the hope has been to find an "Earth twin" - a planet like ours, orbiting a star like ours, at a distance like ours.

    The new planet around Alpha Centauri B matches Earth only in terms of its mass - making it among the smallest exoplanets we know of.

    But in a catalogue with hundreds of confirmed planets and thousands of planet candidates added since 1992, it is otherwise unremarkable - except for its proximity.

    "Alpha Centauri B is of course a very special case - it's our next door neighbour," said Stephane Udry of the Observatory in Geneva and senior author of the paper.

    "So even if the discovery just stands perfectly normally in the discoveries we have had up to now, it's a landmark discovery, because it's very low-mass and it's our closest neighbour."

    Marek Kukula, Public Astronomer at the Royal Observatory Greenwich, said that beyond that, the planet's very existence makes a tantalising suggestion.

    "Everything that we've discovered in the last few years tells us that where we find one small, rocky planet there are likely to be others," he told BBC News.

    "I think the odds are very good that there may well be other planets in this system a little further out, perhaps a little more comfortable temperatures - so I think the hunt is on."

  16. #66
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    Distant planets



    An artist's impression of the planet 55 Cancri e orbiting its sun in the constellation of Cancer. The rocky planet, made largely out of diamond, moves so fast that a year there lasts a mere 18 hours



    Kepler-22b, the most Earth-like planet ever discovered, is circling a star 600 light years away. It is the smallest and the best positioned to have liquid water on its surface - among the ingredients necessary for life on Earth.



    An icy planet-forming disk around a young star called TW Hydrae, located about 175 light-years away in the Hydra, or Sea Serpent, constellation



    A view of a Saturn-sized planet orbiting 79 Ceti.



    A newly discovered planet, designated by the unglamorous identifier of OGLE-2005-BLG-390Lb, orbits a red star five times less massive than the Sun and located at a distance of about 20,000 light years



    Kepler-11, a sun-like star around which six planets orbit. At times, two or more planets pass in front of the star at once, as shown in a simultaneous transit of three planets.



    The Jupiter-size extrasolar planet, HD 189733b, being eclipsed by its parent star. The planet is a 'hot Jupiter', so close to its parent star that it completes an orbit in only 2.2 days.



    A hot, rocky, geologically active planet glowing in the deep red light of its nearby parent star, the M dwarf Gliese 876. The heat and the reddish light are among the few things about the planet that are certain, depending on the thickness and composition of its atmosphere - if any - it could range from being a barren, cratered ball of rock like Mercury or the Moon, to being a featureless, cloud-shrouded cue-ball like Venus.



    The first visible-light snapshot of a planet circling another star. Estimated to be no more than three times Jupiter's mass, the planet, called Fomalhaut b, orbits the bright southern star Fomalhaut, located 25 light-years away in the constellation Piscis Australis, or the "Southern Fish."



    A baffling planet, known as HAT-P-1, that is much larger than theory predicts. The planet has a radius about 1.38 times Jupiter's but contains only half Jupiter's mass.



    A rich starry sky fills the view from an ancient gas-giant planet in the core of the globular star cluster M4. The 13-billion-year-old planet orbits a helium white-dwarf star and the millisecond pulsar B1620-26, seen at lower left. The globular cluster is deficient in heavier elements for making planets, so the existence of such a world implies that planet formation may have been quite efficient in the early universe

  17. #67
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    The circumbinary planet Kepler-16b - the first planet known to definitively orbit two stars. The cold planet, with its gaseous surface, is not thought to be habitable. The largest of the two stars, a K dwarf, is about 69 percent the mass of our sun, and the smallest, a red dwarf, is about 20 percent the sun's mass. These star pairs are called eclipsing binaries.



    Planet 2003UB313, the most distant object ever detected orbiting the sun, at the lonely outer fringes of our solar system. Our sun can be seen in the distance. The planet is at least as big as Pluto and about three times farther away from the Sun than Pluto



    A Jupiter-sized planet passing in front of its parent star. Such events are called transits. When the planet transits the star, the star's apparent brightness drops by a few percent for a short period.



    An exoplanet 6 times the size of Earth circulating around its low-mass host star at a distance equal to 1/20th of the Earth-Sun distance. The host star is a companion to two other low-mass stars, which are seen here in the distance (L).



    A unique type of exoplanet discovered with the Hubble Space Telescope. The planet is so close it to its star that it completes an orbit in 10.5 hours. The planet is only 750,000 miles from the star, or 1/130th the distance between Earth and the Sun.



    A fledgling solar system containing deep within it enough water vapor to fill all the oceans on Earth five times, located in our Milky Way galaxy about 1,000 light years from Earth in the constellation Perseus.



    The first photograph of a planet beyond our solar system, released by the University of Jena and the European Space Observatory April 5, 2005. The planet, orbiting a star similiar to our young Sun known as GQ Lupi, is thought to be one to two times as massive as Jupiter.



    A view of the Whirlpool Galaxy showing the spiral galaxy's curving arms where newborn stars reside and its yellowish central core that serves as home for older stars.



    The Elephant's Trunk Nebula, an elongated dark globule within the emission nebula IC 1396 in the constellation of Cepheus

  18. #68
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    Galaxies like fireflies, a bridge of hot gas, and a catastrophic decline in cosmic GDP

    Our pick of the best space-related images from November includes a graph illustrating the terminal decline in the universe's output



    The sky over the European Southern Observatory's Paranal Observatory in the Atacama desert, Chile, studded with cosmic bling. The most prominent is the Carina Nebula, glowing red in the middle of the image



    Astronomers concluded that a pair of white dwarf stars are orbiting each other at the centre of this planetary nebula, Fleming 1 in the constellation Centaurus. The stars' orbital motions explain the remarkably symmetric structures of the jets in the surrounding gas clouds in this new image from the ESO Very Large Telescope



    Australians were treated to a rare spectacle on 14 November: the 'diamond ring effect' shortly after totality during a solar eclipse. Eclipse hunters flocked to Queensland's tropical northeast to watch the region's first total solar eclipse in 1,300 years. This picture was taken at Palm Cove



    Nasa released this composite image of the star factory Cygnus OB2. The image comprises x-ray data from the Chandra observatory (blue), infrared from Spitzer (red), and optical data from the Isaac Newton Telescope (orange). Cygnus OB2 is the closest massive star cluster to Earth, and is thought to contain around 1,500 stars under seven million years old – mere babies by cosmic standards



    The afterglow of a supernova or exploding star about 10,000 light-years away in the constellation Aquila (the Eagle). Supernova remnant W44 measures about 100 light-years across. All that remains of the massive star is the spinning core of a neutron star, or pulsar, top left



    Jets powered by the gravitational energy of a supermassive black hole in the core of the elliptical galaxy, Hercules A. The picture was created using the combined imaging power of the Hubble Space Telescope and the Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope in New Mexico



    At only 1,500 light years away, the Orion nebula is the brightest diffuse nebula in the night sky. This optical image shows a large cavity created by the radiation pressure from newborn stars in the brightest region, lying within a huge cloud of dust and gas



    The Planck space telescope discovered a bridge of hot gas that connects galaxy clusters Abell 399 (lower centre) and Abell 401 (top left). The pair of clusters is about a billion light-years from Earth, and the gas bridge extends approximately 10m light-years between them



    Instruments aboard Nasa's Messenger spacecraft studying Mercury – the closest planet to the sun – provided compelling evidence that there is water ice and organic molecules in the permanent shade of its polar craters. 'Small, airless, sun-blasted Mercury would seem the last place in the solar system one should expect to find ice fields and frozen organic molecules. But Nasa says they're there … ' reported the Guardian's astronomy blogger, Stuart Clark

  19. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Lick
    Our pick of the best space-related images from November
    Raise ya

    The Best Astronomy Images of 2012


    I couldn’t pick just 10—you have to see all 21 of these mind-bending shots.


    The Sun’s Arch Rival


    On Aug. 31, 2012, the Sun had a major hissy fit: A vast arch of material was lifted up off the surface by the Sun’s powerful magnetic field. Sometimes these arches collapse back down, but this one erupted, blasting literally hundreds of millions of tons of superheated plasma into space at a speed of 1,400 kilometers per second (900 miles per second)—over a thousand times faster than a rifle bullet. The scale of this is crushing—the arch was 300,000 kilometers (200,000) miles) across, 25 times larger than the Earth. As we near the peak of the Sun’s magnetic cycle, we’ll be seeing even more activity like this in the coming months.


    slate.com

    need to follow the link for the rest .....................

    Best astronomy images 2012: See the most beautiful images of the universe. - Slate Magazine

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    Great photos Mid.

    Here a photo of the Dragon spacecraft that will fly to the ISS in february/march on the right, nicely packaged.

    Merry Christmas

    Here is something extremely exciting, that has happened a few days ago.

    Single Camera: Grasshopper 12-Story Test Flight 12/17/12 - YouTube


    Again for some reason it will not embed, but you can see the video clicking on the link. A youtube video of the SpaceX grashopper test vehicle. It may not look impressive to you but is to me. What you don't get from the video, this thing is huge. A 10 storey high structure making a flight of 12 storeys high. It is not designed and build originally for such hops. It is exactly the hardware built as the first stage of a launch vehicle that has alredy delivered cargo to the ISS and will soon be able to launch astronauts. The grashopper is cleared by aviation authorities to fly up to 3,5km high. This are only the very first baby steps. Next year it is expected to fly supersonic then return to the launch pad and have a soft landing. The owner of the company said recently, he expecs that the craft will probably produce a few craters, but that is not to worry, just normal during extensive testing.

    The grashopper is a testvehicle that will lead to reusable rockets, initially the first stage, but later the second stage too. The first stage will make a soft landing after launching the second stage and payload. The purpose is to bring launch cost way down.

  21. #71
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    A version, that embeds.

    Grasshopper 12-Story Test Flight 12/17/12

    To give a sense of proportion, see the cowboy.




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    These images of Saturn in eclipse with the sun, taken recently from Cassini, are superb.


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    What sort of image is that? doesnt look real.

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    Looks a bit photo-shopped.

    I did not think the rings would be bright enough to illuminate the darkside of Saturn so much.

    The illumination is green but the rings are white (made of ice) and Saturn itself is not green.

    Why is it only the northern hemisphere that is illuminated?

    The inner ring is dense enough to catch the light from the sun and be visible but apparently not dense enough to obscure the backside illumination of Saturn at all

  25. #75
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    Apparently the colour is original, probably due to the filters used.

    Images taken using infrared, red and violet spectral filters were combined to create this enhanced-color view. The images were obtained with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on Oct. 17, 2012 at a distance of approximately 500,000 miles

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