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  1. #1
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    IAAF Refuses To Lift Russia Ban For Rio Games

    A ban preventing Russian athletes from taking part in the Rio Olympics will not be lifted by the IAAF, Sky sources understand.

    The IAAF suspended Russian track and field athletes from competition in November after a WADA report which detailed a systemic doping programme and corruption by sports officials.

    In its bid to overturn the ban, Russia has announced a raft of reforms including the introduction of compulsory anti-doping classes in schools.

    IAAF Refuses To Lift Russia Ban For Rio Games
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  2. #2
    Days Work Done! Norton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kurgen
    WADA report which detailed a systemic doping programme and corruption by sports officials.
    Suppose "systematic" means state sposored but banning all Russian athletes is overkill and punishing ones who are not doping. WADA needs to get off their asses and test each and every athlete. Ban those who dope and leave the rest to participate.

  3. #3
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    it was cheating on a grand scale, the whole team should be punished.




    Russia Olympics ban: IAAF's 'crack in the door' is a cop-out that the Russians will exploit in the courts

    OLIVER BROWN
    CHIEF SPORTS FEATURE WRITER


    A “tiny crack in the door”. It was an innocuous enough expression, but one with far-reaching repercussions. By allowing Russian athletes a back door into this summer’s Olympic Games, the International Association of Athletics Federations has turned what could have been a blanket ban, and a confidence-restoring gesture in track and field, into an incomplete fudge that is ripe for all manner of challenge and compromise.

    Just watch over the coming weeks as the Russians try to wrench open this “tiny crack” with a giant crowbar.

    Sebastian Coe, the IAAF president, argued that the ruling to uphold Russia’s exclusion from international competition – with telling exceptions for individuals subject to anti-doping regimes outside the country – was borne of a tortured battle of conscience. Perhaps so, but great decisions of the heart tend not to come with footnotes or caveats.

    This was a cop-out, and a grimly predictable one.

    Gravely, Coe called it a “sad day for our sport”. But it was a wonderful day for lawyers. The briefs have been all over this judgment, as Rune Andersen, head of the IAAF’s taskforce on Russian doping, acknowledged by disclosing that the “tiny crack” clause had been specifically added to make it easier for them in court.

    The irony is that it will most likely do nothing of the kind. This IAAF loophole is itself a recipe for legal wrangling as aggrieved Russians appeal desperately for clemency.

    There was little, as usual, in the IAAF’s language that made much sense. Coe claimed that the ruling was “non-negotiable”. But by enabling certain Russians a diversionary route into Rio, it was the very definition of negotiable. Why, when the Russian system was described by John Coates, vice-president of the International Olympic Committee, as “rotten to the core”, was the IAAF even thinking of soft-pedalling this issue?

    The answer, of course, is that there is huge political pressure at play here. The IOC are both desperate to see Russian stars on the track in Brazil and scared stiff of antagonising Vladimir Putin. Russia is a hugely important partner for the Olympics: Putin ploughed £30 billion into his show of power in Sochi, while Alexander Zhukov, head of the national Olympic committee, is head of Thomas Bach’s evaluation commission for the Beijing Winter Games in 2022.

    Putin will detest the fact that any Russians permitted to compete in Rio will be forced to do so behind a neutral white flag, not in their own colours. It was also revealing that last night Russia’s ministry for sport suggested, in a wail of indignation, that they would bypass the IAAF altogether and lobby IOC members directly to overturn the ban. So much, then, for Coe’s insistence that the IAAF were the only ones making the rules.

    There is one very significant figure who the IOC would want in Rio above all others, and her name is Yelena Isinbayeva. The world record-holder in the women’s pole vault is Russia’s most marketable athletics name by far and has become a poster-girl for the Olympic movement, with her two gold medals and her role as an ambassador for the Youth Olympics. Isinbayeva promised that she would be digging in for the long haul, maintaining that she had tested clean all over the world and that banning her would represent a violation of her human rights.

    On the surface, her chances of a reprieve would seem forlorn. As one who has been training for months in Russia, Isinbayeva does not meet the criteria for being granted an exception. But expect her to be used in the six weeks until Rio as the queen in a messy and poisonous political game.

    The pity is that this all ought to have been unambiguous. Russia stands accused of doping violations on an unfathomable scale, with Richard McLaren, the Canadian lawyer investigating on behalf of the World Anti-Doping Agency, partly substantiating the New York Times’s reports that urine samples at the Sochi Olympics were filtered by Russia so that they did not even reach the testing laboratory.

    Theirs is a system that is, in the words of Andersen himself, “tainted from top to bottom”. With zero faith in their methods, there remains no failsafe means of establishing who is clean and who is not. It follows, then, that their athletes should be banned from top to bottom, not given a get-out clause as a mutually convenient sop.

    The one exceptional case that can be agreed on is that of Yuliya Stepanova, whose whistle-blowing blew the lid off the whole elaborate edifice of Russia malfeasance 18 months ago. But there the compromises should end.

    Forget all the talk from Putin that Russia bears “no collective responsibility” and that the fault lies solely with rogue individuals.

    This is a country alleged to have aided and abetted dirty athletes in shocking numbers and whose murky history on drugs in sport stretches back 40 years. With the clock ticking down to Rio, the howls of protest will stretch all the way from St Petersburg to the Sea of Japan, but by now the world of athletics should be brave enough not to give them the time of day.

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/athletics/2016/06/17/russia-olympics-ban-iaafs-crack-in-the-door-is-a-cop-out-that-th/

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Norton View Post

    ...but banning all Russian athletes is overkill and punishing ones who are not doping. WADA needs to get off their asses and test each and every athlete. Ban those who dope and leave the rest to participate.
    Please name three that are not doping?

    Sharapova was busted for using a drug "designed" for patients with heart ailments and yet made by a Lithuanian company and probably not readily available in the west as a heart related medication.

    You maybe correct but I suspect as do others that you can't be at the top of your game in Russia without doping of some description.

    Of course it might be related to other sanctions against Russia which if so is wrong.
    Better to think inside the pub, than outside the box?
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  5. #5
    Days Work Done! Norton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by VocalNeal
    Please name three that are not doping?
    Boris Badenov, Natasha Fatale and Vladimir Ilyich Ulyanov.

    Figured my post would get the response it got but point is if Russian atheletes have all been doing this for years, the WADA needs to get it's act together. Appears to me they have failed to properly do their job and instead of intensifying drug testing on individual Russians have decided on a wholesale ban.

    Up your game WADA.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Norton
    Up your game WADA.
    I think they will. The decision by the track and field IAAF is only the beginning. With evidence so overwhelming they have little choice.

    Quote Originally Posted by taxexile
    Forget all the talk from Putin that Russia bears “no collective responsibility” and that the fault lies solely with rogue individuals
    Very many athletes have registered residence inside military compounds and international anti doping people have been forcefully stopped from doing their controls.

  7. #7
    Days Work Done! Norton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Takeovers
    The decision by the track and field IAAF is only the beginning
    Good. I hope so. Far too many athletes are doping and getting away with it. Russians an extreme case but they aren't the only ones.

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    Isn't it about time we had a doped games and a straight games?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Norton
    Good. I hope so. Far too many athletes are doping and getting away with it. Russians an extreme case but they aren't the only ones.
    Absolutely, it is not only russian athletes. But it seems Russia is one state where it is all done and covered up by all means by the state. Maybe not the only state but one where glaring evidence is available.

  10. #10
    I am no longer a Hostage

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    Quote Originally Posted by Norton View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by VocalNeal
    Please name three that are not doping?
    Boris Badenov, Natasha Fatale and Vladimir Ilyich Ulyanov.

  11. #11
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    It appears that unnamed athletes are being given a free pass rather than being banned from competition. One wonders what the criteria is that is being used and by whom.

    https://www.rt.com/op-edge/359238-wa...ed-substances/



    "Hacktivists, who have released WADA files that greenlighted therapeutic use of banned substances by US athletes, did a public service, as greater transparency is needed so as to understand whether the system is impartial, independent writer Rick Sterling told RT."
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    Quote Originally Posted by Takeovers
    But it seems Russia is one state where it is all done and covered up by all means by the state.
    Only Russians eh.


    https://www.rt.com/sport/359877-mo-f...al-drug-tests/

    "The most high-profile names on the list are Great Britain’s ‘double-double’ Olympic champion Mo Farah and Spanish tennis great Rafael Nadal. They appear on a 26-name list alongside athletes from Argentina, Belgium, Burundi, Canada, Denmark, France, Hungary and the USA."

    I'm sure the relevant message has been received by all participants in the drug administration upon "appointment" - "There is only one target everybody but the unexceptional ones"

    How does one get appointed to one of these quangos?
    Last edited by OhOh; 20-09-2016 at 09:55 AM.

  13. #13
    Custom user Neverna's Avatar
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    A list of what though? Birthday honours? Illegal drug taking?


    No. Therapeutic Use Exemption (TUE). Given permission by the IOC to use substances that are normally banned. Quite a few athletes are given permission for medical reasons.

  14. #14
    Thailand Expat AntRobertson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neverna
    Quite a few athletes are given permission for medical reasons.
    Quite.

    It's not as though it's State-sponsored endemic cheating or anything.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neverna
    Therapeutic Use Exemption (TUE). Given permission by the IOC to use substances that are normally banned. Quite a few athletes are given permission for medical reasons.
    Exactly.

    The questions to be answered are, who is passed as "fit" to gain an "exception" from the agreed rules? Who are the people who decide such things and why are the names of the exempt athletes not published but hidden from view.

    Or one assumes that would lead to all obtaining a doctors note suggesting a certain course of, otherwise banned, drugs be made available to the athlete.

    Not for any enhanced ability, just to relieve the symptoms of the chronic illness due to over exertion.

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