Page 1 of 9 123456789 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 219
  1. #1
    Member
    harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    Today @ 02:11 PM
    Posts
    58,237

    The RIP Sporting Heroes Thread

    Rather than keep posting such things in separate threads, I think it's better to run a separate thread on the topic.

    Same format as the RIP thread, please put title, picture and biography.

    And please put a link or credits.

    Cheers,
    Harry

    To kick off, the man who faced the last ball in the first ever tied Test match...

    Sports | Sat Oct 3, 2015 12:12pm IST
    Cricket-Former Australian cricketer Lindsay Kline dies, aged 81



    Kline is best known as the man who faced the last ball of the first tied Test, between Australia and the West Indies in 1960.

    A left-arm wrist spinner, Kline played 13 test matches between 1957-61, capturing 34 wickets at an average of 22.82. He took a hat-trick in just his second test, against South Africa in Cape Town in January, 1958.

    "Throughout his cricket career, he was involved in some extraordinary moments that have become part of the rich history of our great game," Cricket Australia chief Executive James Sutherland said in a statement.

    "It has been a very sad year for Australian cricket with the passing of a number of treasured members of our community including Richie Benaud, Arthur Morris and now Lindsay Kline."

    Australia needed just one run to win the opening test against the West Indies in 1960 when Kline flicked a ball to square leg.

    His batting partner Ian Meckiff set off from the non-striker's end in a desperate dash for the single but was run out when West Indian fieldsman Joe Solomon hit the stumps with a direct throw, ensuring test cricket's first tied test. (Reporting by Julian Linden; Editing by Amlan Chakraborty)

    Cricket-Former Australian cricketer Lindsay Kline dies, aged 81 | Reuters

  2. #2
    Member
    harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    Today @ 02:11 PM
    Posts
    58,237
    Oldest British and Irish Lion, Trevor Lloyd dies aged 91
    0 COMMENTS 18:29, 6 OCT 2015 UPDATED 18:31, 6 OCT 2015
    BY SION MORGAN



    Tributes have been paid to former Welsh rugby international Trevor Lloyd, who was the oldest living man to have played for the British and Irish Lions.

    The 91-year-old was part of the Lions tour of South Africa in 1955, which was captained by Cliff Morgan.

    Raised in Taibach, Port Talbot, the scrum-half forged a successful playing career, representing Cwmavon, Aberavon Quins, Maesteg, Bristol Rugby and Glamorgan County.

    But a career defining opportunity came in 1953 when injury to Rex Willis saw Lloyd make his first international starts in Welsh victories over Ireland and France.

    The performances, his only two caps, were enough to earn a call-up with the Lions two years later.

    At 30 years of age he was the oldest player in a tour party chosen specifically for its youth.

    Manager Jack Siggins had decided that he needed a young and lively side to tackle the tough South Africans and initially wanted his fellow selectors to disregard any players over the age of 27.

    The senior squad member, who played six times for the Lions, and scored four conversions against North-East Districts, will also be remembered for giving rise to “Lloyd’s Law”, a fixed item of Lions custom and practice ever since.

    Aware of the formidable competition for female company likely to come from the likes of teenage heartthrob Tony O’Reilly, the Maesteg scrum-half sought and received assurances that no Lion should move in on a girl being chatted up by a team-mate.

    The British Lions Rugby Team at London Airport, where they are about to leave for the Tour of South Africa 1955. Left to right, from the top are Alun Thomas, Haydn Morris, Cliff Morgan, Trevor Lloyd, Courtenay Meredith, Brin Meredith, Billy Williams, Rhys Williams , Russ Robins and Clem Thomas

    According to the late Swansea flanker Clem Thomas the issue was raised at a team meeting with Jack Siggins.

    According to Thomas, Lloyd said: “Hey Jack, what if a player has a girl and somebody tries to muscle in?

    “Now that could cause a great deal of trouble on a tour.

    “I think we should have a rule that nobody interferes with another player’s girl.”

    At club level Lloyd spent the majority of his playing career at Maesteg RFC and was part of the 1949-50 “Invincibles” side which did not lose a game all season.

    He also captained the club five times from 1948 to 1951 and again later between 1953 and 1956.

    On Twitter Maesteg RFC tighthead, Lyndon Davies wrote: “Sad to announce the passing of MRFC legend Trevor Lloyd.

    “Our deepest condolences go to his wife, family and friends.”

    A tribute on the Aberavon Wizards website said: “A blast furnaceman who served in the Navy during World War Two, he remained extremely loyal to Maesteg.

    “From Eastern School in Taibach, he also made appearances for British Steel Co, Aberavon, Cwmavon and Bristol, ending his career at Aberavon Quins.

    “Condolences to his wife Gwenda and family.”

    The oldest living Lion is now Scotland’s Gus Black, part of the 1950 tour to New Zealand and Australia who was 90 in May.

    Oldest British and Irish Lion, Trevor Lloyd dies aged 91 - Wales Online

  3. #3
    POTUS HOCUS
    david44's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Last Online
    03-12-2018 @ 01:21 PM
    Location
    Inner Wrongholia
    Posts
    13,668
    Good idea your not as I dumb as I seem

  4. #4
    ความสุขในอีสาน
    nigelandjan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Frinton on sea and Ban Pak
    Posts
    12,907
    Whats the cut off point for the entries Harry ?

    going backwards that is

  5. #5
    Thailand Expat
    can123's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Last Online
    18-01-2019 @ 03:38 AM
    Posts
    5,417
    Quote Originally Posted by nigelandjan View Post
    Whats the cut off point for the entries Harry ?

    going backwards that is
    They have to be alive and then they have to die, that is the way it works. We do not want an obituary of W.G.Grace because he died a long time ago. We want sportsmen who have clog-popped recently.

  6. #6
    Thailand Expat
    chassamui's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Bali
    Posts
    11,678
    Quote Originally Posted by can123
    They have to be alive and then they have to die, that is the way it works. We do not want an obituary of W.G.Grace because he died a long time ago. We want sportsmen who have clog-popped recently
    Thanks Harry.

  7. #7
    ความสุขในอีสาน
    nigelandjan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Frinton on sea and Ban Pak
    Posts
    12,907
    Quote Originally Posted by chassamui
    Thanks Harry.
    Sussed multi nicking from within the valleys

  8. #8
    Member
    harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    Today @ 02:11 PM
    Posts
    58,237
    Yes, I think being alive now and then dying is a pretty good criterion with which to start.

  9. #9
    Member
    harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    Today @ 02:11 PM
    Posts
    58,237
    Legendary Everton player and manager Howard Kendall dies at the age of 69

    EVERTON'S most successful manager Howard Kendall, who led the club to two league titles, has died at the age 69.

    By CHARLIE PHILLIPPE
    PUBLISHED: 12:01, Sat, Oct 17, 2015 | UPDATED: 12:18, Sat, Oct 17, 2015



    Kendall won the title with the club as a player in 1969 as part of the famous 'Holy Trinity' along with Alan Ball and Colin Harvey, but undoubtedly his best achievements came when he returned to Goodison Park in 1981.

    Within three years the legendary Goodison Park boss had won the First Division championship, repeating the feat in 1987, while also winning the FA Cup and European Cup-Winners' Cup in the club's most successful era in which the Toffees became a powerhouse of British football.

    "It is with great sadness that Everton Football Club has learned of the passing of Howard Kendall," said a statement from the club.

    "The most successful manager in the history of the club and one of the greatest players to pull on the Everton jersey, he passed away in hospital in Southport this morning at the age of 69, surrounded by loved ones.

    "The thoughts of everyone associated with the club are with Howard's family at this difficult time and it would be appreciated if everyone could respect their request for privacy."

    He returned to Everton twice more from 1990-93 and from 1997-98 and also managed Athletic Bilbao in Spain, Manchester City, Greek side Xanthi as well as Notts County and Sheffield United, and ended his career with a return to Greece at Ethnikos Piraeus.

    Former Everton player and manager Howard Kendall dies at the age of 69 | Football | Sport | Daily Express

  10. #10
    Thailand Expat Bruce Bayliss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Last Online
    18-01-2016 @ 06:16 AM
    Posts
    2,595
    He did well

  11. #11
    Member
    harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    Today @ 02:11 PM
    Posts
    58,237
    Tom Graveney, former England captain and MCC president, dies aged 88



    Former England captain and MCC president Tom Graveney has died aged 88.

    Graveney made 11 centuries in 79 Test matches for England between 1951 and 1969, scoring 4,882 runs at an average of 44.38.

    Appointed president of the MCC in 2005, and an honorary life member of the Lord’s club, Graveney played county cricket at both Gloucestershire and Worcestershire.

    Confirmation of Graveney’s death came from the MCC, which is set to release a full statement later on Tuesday.

    Graveney also had a spell playing in Australia with Queensland, and remained involved in the sport as a commentator following his retirement in 1972.


    http://www.theguardian.com/sport/201...land-mcc-dies?

  12. #12
    Thailand Expat Bruce Bayliss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Last Online
    18-01-2016 @ 06:16 AM
    Posts
    2,595
    A reasonable knock but the umpire has raised his finger

  13. #13
    Member
    harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    Today @ 02:11 PM
    Posts
    58,237
    Ah God Bless you Pat, many happy memories of you charging across the finish line.

    Pat Eddery, 11 times champion jockey, dies aged 63
    • Retired having won 4,632 British Flat races
    • Triumphed in three Derbys over three decades



    Pat Eddery, the 11 times champion jockey, has died aged 63.

    Born in Newbridge, Co Clare, Eddery won 4,632 British Flat races, including 14 Classics, and was champion Flat jockey 11 times between 1974 and 1996.

    He rode some of the best racehorses of the late 20th century including Bosra Sham, Dancing Brave, El Gran Senor, Grundy and Pebbles.

    He also rode 11 Classic winners in Ireland, where he was champion jockey in 1982, and five in France. He retired in 2003.

    Teddy Grimthorpe, racing manager to Prince Khalid Abdullah, in whose silks Eddery had some of his greatest days, said: “It is extremely sad news. Everyone at Juddmonte is very shocked and saddened by it.”

    Eddery’s achievements put him on record as one of the greatest jockeys of all time. He won three Derbys, aboard Grundy (1975), Golden Fleece (1982) and Quest For Fame (1990). However, his performance aboard Dancing Brave in the 1986 Prix de l’Arc de Triomphe is widely regarded as one of the most memorable of his career.

    In one of the classiest fields ever assembled, Eddery made his challenge last, down the centre of the track, to snatch victory.

    Other famous successes include those of Pebbles at the Breeders’ Cup, Silver Patriarch in the St Leger – which marked his 4,000th winner – and Zafonic in the 2000 Guineas.

    Grimthorpe believes Eddery’s championship tally was testament to his abilities in a golden era for jockeys. “He spanned the greatest era for jockeys ever. Lester Piggott, Steve Cauthen, Willie Carson, all were exceptional yet Pat’s ability was unquestioned,” said Grimthorpe.

    Eddery, who had been suffering from ill health of late, began a training career following his retirement, with the highlight being the victory of Hearts Of Fire in a Group One in France.

    Bruce Raymond, a former weighing room colleague, described Eddery as a “fun guy” and “ultra competitive”.

    “It’s very sad. He’d been unwell for a long time. I just knew him as a good, fun guy. Everybody knows he was a great jockey,” said Raymond.

    “We used to play cards and have lots of fun. I can’t imagine anyone being in his company and not enjoying it.

    “I was with him abroad - Hong Kong, Italy, Germany, everywhere. We travelled together. He was good, fun guy and very generous.

    “He was blooming tough to ride against and cool. He was ultra competitive. He would beat you in a photograph and laugh about it afterwards.”

    Link

    Last edited by harrybarracuda; 10-11-2015 at 07:38 PM.

  14. #14
    Thailand Expat Bruce Bayliss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Last Online
    18-01-2016 @ 06:16 AM
    Posts
    2,595
    A rare breed indeed

  15. #15
    Member
    harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    Today @ 02:11 PM
    Posts
    58,237
    I emailed the news yesterday to one of his peers I know who retired to the arse end of Europe.

    In his reply, he said "He was a real Jockey's Jockey. It is used too easy these days but he was a true legend".

    Nice.

  16. #16
    Thailand Expat Bruce Bayliss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Last Online
    18-01-2016 @ 06:16 AM
    Posts
    2,595
    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda
    "He was a real Jockey's Jockey.
    They have a hard life...fasting so they are almost anorexic...up every morning at dawn riding hundred of kilograms of powerful horse muscle...smoking like chimneys to ease the hunger pangs...they are incredible little people

  17. #17
    Thailand Expat
    palexxxx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Chiang Mai
    Posts
    4,152
    All Blacks legend Jonah Lomu dead at 40

    Tom Decent


    RIP Jonah Lomu: All Blacks winger Jonah Lomu has passed away, aged 40. Photo: Craig Golding

    The rugby world is in mourning following the tragic death of All Blacks legend Jonah Lomu.
    The former New Zealand winger, the star of the 1995 World Cup, was 40.
    The All Blacks team doctor said it was an unexpected death, according to a report from New Zealand television station 3News.
    Lomu played 63 Tests for the All Blacks in a glittering career cut short by kidney disease.




    All Blacks legend Jonah Lomu dead at 40
    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." - Abe Lincoln.

  18. #18
    Thailand Expat
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    60,017
    Lomu revolutionised rugby as a blockbusting winger - as big as most forwards yet able to run like the wind.

    Of Tongan heritage, Lomu attended Auckland’s Wesley College and shot to prominence at aged 19 when he became the youngest All Blacks Test player when he debuted against France in 1994.

    His finest moments came at Rugby World Cups and in 1995 he took the game by storm when he scored seven tries in five games, including four tries in the demolition of England - memorably steamrolling England fullback Mike Catt.

    He scored 37 tries for New Zealand and shares the World Cup try-scoring record with Bryan Habana with 15.

    Jonah Lomu dead: All Blacks legend dies

  19. #19
    Thailand Expat
    Headworx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Jomtien
    Posts
    3,402
    RIP big man and I really do mean BIG. Standing in the immigration queue leaving Brisbane international many years back and his Super 12 or 14 team (or whatever it was back then) were also flying out, they were lined up for the counter next to mine. Big boys for sure, but Lomu dwarfed them. Their travel strip was loose fitting jeans, a denim shirt, and sports shoes of which Lomu must have had a size 16 or 17. But even in loose clothes there was no hiding the fact that this guy was built like a brick shithouse and was some sort of an athletic freak. He had a smile and nod for everyone he noticed staring at him, including my awe-struck self. Some people, very few in fact, have a certain presence about them when you see them in the flesh. This great man was one of them.

  20. #20
    Thailand Expat Bruce Bayliss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Last Online
    18-01-2016 @ 06:16 AM
    Posts
    2,595
    Quote Originally Posted by Headworx
    Some people, very few in fact, have a certain presence about them when you see them in the flesh. This great man was one of them.
    True. The guy was a real stand out, especially the RWC in 1995 and that last minute try against the team in yellow in 2000 in Sydney. RIP big guy.

  21. #21
    Thailand Expat Bobcock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    15,842
    Very sad news, had the pleasure of coaching with him for an hour once, he called ME coach the whole time.....

    I felt special I can tell you.

  22. #22
    POTUS HOCUS
    david44's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Last Online
    03-12-2018 @ 01:21 PM
    Location
    Inner Wrongholia
    Posts
    13,668
    A true legend farewell so young

  23. #23
    Thailand Expat Bruce Bayliss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Last Online
    18-01-2016 @ 06:16 AM
    Posts
    2,595

    OPINION: In 1995 Jonah Lomu appeared on the world's television screens. Suddenly blokes who were normally down the allotment digging spuds were wedged into their armchairs. Women rushed home from their book clubs. Lomu wasn't about sport. He was bigger than that. He pushed the boundaries of what a human being was capable of.

    Lomu's performance in the '95 World Cup semifinal against England was rugby's moon landing. It was one giant step for mankind. Rugby was no longer seen as a game played in a few former Commonwealth countries and the British public schools. Overnight rugby became sexy because this colossal, young Tongan New Zealander had trampled empire under his hooves.

    What a symbol of uprising that first try against England became. Young Tony Underwood, well spoken, born in Malaysia, educated at Cambridge, had been given the job of marking Lomu. It seems extraordinary now, but England had no set plan to stop this athletic freak. So little Underwood, sounding more like a quaint English village than a resistance fighter, was assigned to stop the great march of globalization.
    Underwood reached for the tackle and was left face down in the dirt. The first surprising things about Lomu, all 6ft 5inches and 17 stone of him, was the sheer speed of that outside swerve. Underwood was seriously quick, but Lomu took him on the outside with astonishing pace and deception.

    Underwood said later, "On that day he became more than just a player, he became the essence of the World Cup."
    The next man in the firing line was Will Carling, who epitomised the world's view of English arrogance. Carling was English army background and took privilege for granted, wide chin thrust out at the hoi polloi. Carling got close to Lomu, but only close enough to try an ankle tap.

    The second truly surprising thing about Lomu was his balance. Maybe the bigger they are, the harder they fall, but how many times did we see Lomu keep his feet. He was hit so often and from so many angles, yet he very rarely went down. That wasn't because of any clichéd advantage, like a low centre of gravity, it was because he had the balance of a gymnast. Lomu stumbled, but he didn't fall.

    The last line of defence was Mike Catt, the English South African.
    "I remember him stumbling towards me. I remember thinking there's going to be a bit of a train crash here and recalling the words of my teachers – go low and drive through the tackle. The next thing I remember is lying on my back."
    At that point Robin Brooke arrived on the scene, like a Sunday afternoon rubbernecker. He tapped Catt on the face and said, "Mate, there's a lot more of that to come."

    There was another 77 minutes to come and rugby changed for ever. Normally an impartial Englishman, much to the disgust of my mates I wore a New Zealand silver fern tie that afternoon. Yes, I was being provocative, but I was also trying to say that the rugby mattered a lot more than the country. Who cared about being English when you could watch Lomu. My allegiance was to his talent.

    Before the final South Africa altered their whole game plan just to cope with one player. Bill McLaren would some day say, "It's like trying to tackle a snooker table…Now I'm not a hod man, but if I saw Jonah Lomu running at me I'd be putting down bricks, I'll tell you."

    South Africa put down a lot of bricks. The only thing that could stop Lomu on the pitch was a wall. I remember him tossing big Fijians to the grounds as if they were a handful of paper clips. He once carried eight Frenchman to the tryline. These are legendary memories and, unlike most memories, they are not so very exaggerated. Go check out YouTube.

    Because that was the thing about Lomu. He was the exaggeration. Was he really just 20 years of age at that World Cup? Lomu really was larger than life. That was the point of awe. He didn't need a nickname. Jonah was all that had to be said.

    After that World Cup the game of rugby turned professional. A suave Welshman called Phil Kingsley Jones sold Jonah to the world, but he didn't need selling. In fact Lomu was rather shy and quietly spoken, a whale out of water. He had this great, great gift but it came with a Faustian pact.

    Lomu's kidneys were shot. On the pitch he was superman. But once the game was over, Lomu's blood limped round his veins like lead. The world would go out on the lash and tell tales of wonder at his great exploits, while Jonah crept back to his hotel room and fell asleep in an egg sandwich.

    You think of Pele and Best, of Bolt and Borg, of Woods and Phelps, and you think of Jonah Lomu. He was one of the seven wonders of the world of modern sport. Lomu gave his life to rugby and he changed the game forever.

    - Stuff

  • #24
    Thailand Expat

    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    6,269
    RIP Jonah... great and humble man... awesome role-model for Kiwi kids.

    Our whole country mourns his passing.

  • #25
    Thailand Expat
    Little Chuchok's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Last Online
    Today @ 12:25 PM
    Posts
    9,383
    Sad news indeed.

    The mark of the man, was that in 1995 at the RWC, he was ill with his kidney disease, (And for quite a few years after) never told anybody that he was sick. Even when people called him lazy, or not up to it etc.

  • Page 1 of 9 123456789 LastLast

    Thread Information

    Users Browsing this Thread

    There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •