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  1. #1
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    which gas stove ?

    Hi everyone ,
    I have decided to do a little home cooking and would like to purchase a gas burner table top stove .
    The problem is that ever hardware shop seems to have about a dozen different ones to choose from .
    It is a case of I cant see the wood for the trees .
    Does any one have any advice on what to look for before I buy one or do I just close my eyes and point at one ?
    Thanx in advance

  2. #2
    Days Work Done! Norton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rawky
    Does any one have any advice on what to look for before I buy one or do I just close my eyes and point at one ?
    If you're talking about the double burner gas "stoves" then they are all about the same. Where will you locate the stove? Inside or outside?

    If inside, make sure the gas bottle is outside or you may be have a big explosion in the house.

  3. #3
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    Hi .
    Most probably outside .
    Another thing I would like to point out is that the cooking I will be doing will be slow stewing as in curries rather than stirfryng .

  4. #4
    Have you got any cheese Thetyim's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rawky
    the cooking I will be doing will be slow stewing as in curries
    Would an electric slow cooker be suitable for you ?
    They are only 600 baht compared to 2500 for a gas burner + bottle

  5. #5
    Days Work Done! Norton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thetyim
    Would an electric slow cooker be suitable for you ?
    Quote Originally Posted by rawky
    I will be doing will be slow stewing as in curries rather than stirfryng
    Electric would be good for slow stewing and no need to worry about gas bottle.

  6. #6
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    Hi again ,
    The slow cooker ia a good idea but dont forget that with curries you need to fry the onions and spices first on a med heat .
    Maybe an electric hob which I could regulate would be better .
    Thanx for your input .

  7. #7
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    I use one those camping style single burner butane cartridge stove in my Bangkok room. Works great, the cartridges aren't too expensive and the unit is only 600 bht to begin with. You can find them everywhere.

  8. #8
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    I know the gas bottles look dodgy, but I've always had them inside here, and in Korea. Has anyone ever heard of one actually blowing up? I think (I'm guessing and hoping) that they're a lot safer than they look.

    I mean, back in the UK you get gas explosions from leaks in pipes, so these short pipes from strong bottles have less risk in that department, amybe, perhaps, I don't actually know what I'm talking about... but, has anyone ever seen one blow up or heard of one blowing up in a kitchen? In ten years, I haven't.

  9. #9
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    If home is a rented apartment you should ask the landlord first, most wont allow any gas appliances.


    Ive used the rice cooker to make stews in the past, they cook a treat !!

  10. #10
    Have you got any cheese Thetyim's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bettyboo
    has anyone ever seen one blow up or heard of one blowing up in a kitchen?
    The hotel that burnt down in Pattaya

  11. #11
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    Although this is an old thread, since the topic is still relevant to everyday living in Thailand and other places where they use gas tanks for stoves, I'd like to say something about the tanks.

    It is common practice in SE Asian countries to have these tanks in the house, located somewhere not too far from the stove. This would never be possible in the west because it violates all safety regulations. I think because this violates Western safety codes many people have an exaggerated idea about the dangers of keeping these tanks indoors.

    This is not the first thread I have seen which warns that the tank could explode and advises the poster to keep the tank outside, not inside.

    I do not know what happened at the Pattaya hotel. Maybe someone has more information about what caused the explosion in that case? Did the tank there explode because the hotel was already on fire?

    The main thing here is: the chance of these tanks exploding inside a house is practically nil, unless there is a major fire or the tank is subjected to some source of high heat for a prolonged period. These tanks are built to certain specifications. They do not simply explode on their own. For that to happen they would be need to be subjected to extreme damage and/or (more likely) heat.

    I have seen many people on various threads like this advising others to place the tanks outside instead of inside. This is not necessarily a good idea, because of the extreme heat and sun in this climate. Remember, heat is one of the major catalysts for the explosion.

    If locating the tank outside the house, you would at least want to place it in a structure that insulated it from extreme weather. And depending on where you located the tank outside (how far from the house) it may or may not make a difference in the grand scheme of things.

    You need to ask yourself: can you locate the tank far enough from the house that if it did explode it wouldn't cause the house to catch fire? Are you also going to install underground piping to move the gas from the tank to your stove, so that you can locate the tank far away? Depending on your situation that may not even be possible.

    In short, there is little reason to worry about using these tanks in the house unless your daily indoor entertainment involves machine guns and flame throwers. Just make sure the tank is in an area where it is not subjected to excessive heat or something with a live flame could fall over on top of it and make sure your kitchen area is well ventilated (just having the windows open when you cook should be sufficient).

    Hope this info will be helpful to the next person who is considering buying a gas stove but has no experience using one which is hooked up to a tank. Personally, I think the extra caution exercised in the West is commendable (it is always best to err on the side of caution), but having these tanks indoors is not unsafe in 99.9% of situations. You would already need to be in danger yourself (house has caught on fire) for the tank itself to be in danger of exploding.
    Last edited by vienvien; 01-09-2014 at 12:53 PM.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bettyboo View Post
    I know the gas bottles look dodgy, but I've always had them inside here, and in Korea. Has anyone ever heard of one actually blowing up? I think (I'm guessing and hoping) that they're a lot safer than they look.

    I mean, back in the UK you get gas explosions from leaks in pipes, so these short pipes from strong bottles have less risk in that department, amybe, perhaps, I don't actually know what I'm talking about... but, has anyone ever seen one blow up or heard of one blowing up in a kitchen? In ten years, I haven't.
    Have seen some destroyed boats though....was in a wayside restaurant here in Thailand when the connecting pipe came off the burner just before it was about to be lit...frickin great jet of gas, pipe snaking all over....I rushed round and turned it off (shitting myself of course)..seems the regulator was stuffed or the wrong type and only one hose clamp..always advisable to use two.

    We have a flat recessed glass 3 burner hob..much easier to keep clean than stainless. Wife's idea..strange really since I am the appointed hob cleaner.
    SIL bought a real nice counter top 3 burner hob in a market..1100baht. MIL had one of those with mesh type burners..burned out all but one after about a year..probably best avoid that type methinks.

  13. #13
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    One nice safety feature of our flush/drop in hob is the heat sensitive node next to the ignition node..think it is filled with wax or something such that if the flame goes out it cools and cuts of gas supply to the burner. Maybe available in counter top versions..Donít know.

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