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  1. #1
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    El Gibbon's Avatar
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    Another Bread Thread

    OK, got me a new stand mixer and am trying some recipes using mechanical kneading.

    The recipe:

    1 lb of bread flour

    10 oz. water

    1 teaspoon of instant yeast

    2 tablespoons of honey

    1 teaspoon of salt.

    take 5 oz of the flour, all the honey and 1/4 teaspoon of yeast and mix together well. Refrigerate of at least 8 hours, over night is good. This allows some of the flour to become hydrated and to also pick up some of the taste from the fermenting yeast cells, although they have been retarded by the chill.

    This gives it an 'almost' sourdough taste.

    The rest of the flour goes in the mixer bowl along with remainder of the yeast and the salt. Add the wet stuff and mix on low. Once all ingredients are combined the bowl will look empty, all the stuff will be gathered on your bread hook.

    Remove it from the hook, cover the bowl and let stand for 20 minutes, don't be in a rush!

    After 20 minutes start kneading with the bread hook on medium for 5 - 10 minutes. You'll know when its had enough. Remove dough to let it rise, double in size no matter how long it takes.



    I use this tall symmetrical container, (make sure its lightly oiled or I use spray stuff) it make it easy to judge when the double has occurred. Lost my big rubber band to mark where it starts out... but a piece of string or tape will do.

    now the neat part

    Place dough on your work surface.

    (for some reason the flash didn't work and with dirty hands didn't want to be diddling with the camera.)



    Lightly flour the back of your fingers. Don't use your palms as they are too "hot"



    Knead using your knuckles as shown. You are moving yeast cells around and redistributing the new cells. Knead till flatish.

    Make like a trifold wallet as shown in the following pics







    Knead again



    make another trifold





    Press it together pretty firmly.

    Cover and let stand for a minimum of 10 minutes

    Uncover and knead again with your fingers.



    Again your just distributing yeast cells, you may hear gas popping but its no big deal.

    Next your going to shape. Take the corners and fold inward, your going to make like a mushroom cap. Keep moving the edges into the center of the bottom. Like the pics show.







    keep tucking into the middle of the bottom until you get a nice smooth skin on the ball. Your actually stretching gluten to for a smooth surface.



    With the ball of dough on your lightly floured surface place it between your hands and rotate and swirl the base of the ball around the board. DON'T squeeze or try and shape the ball in any way. This helps to tighten the ball.

    Place your dough on whatever your going to cook on. My flower pots pans are too high for my oven so am using a cookie sheet with parchment paper. (easy clean up for me lol)



    Cover with a towel and leave for 1 HOUR.

    After one hour score the top with a bread or other very sharp knife. This is not for decoration but to allow the dough to expand easily during oven rise, which should be about 10 %



    Bake in a preheated (200 C) oven until golden brown and the internal temp. reaches at least 203 but not more than 210. If over 210 the moisture will tend to boil out and you will have dry crappy bread. (Crumbs???)





    Get one of these things. Will be great help in a lot of cooking chores. Not expensive and easily found in most good shops.



    A note or two..... using the refrigerated sponge without moving to room temp. I noticed the dough was still pretty cool to the touch when kneading. Maybe getting the sponge up to room temp would reduce the time for the doubling rise.

    The bottom of the loaf didn't come out quite as expected. Pretty sure its because the cookie sheet wasn't preheated. Intended to move the parchment and loaf to the terracota plates but they were too tall for the oven. Next time I'll put the cookie sheet in the oven and do the rise on an overturned sheet pan and then slide to the cookie sheet for baking.

    This seems to be a wet sticky dough when you first handle it, but keeping everything lightly floured its easy to work with. Give a nice moist crumb.

    All in all it came out a damn fine loaf of bread.

    E. G.
    "If you can't stand the answer --
    Don't ask the question!"

  2. #2
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    mingmong's Avatar
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    12-08-2019 @ 07:34 PM
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    thanks EL G, I'm trying to make Bread here in N.Thailand too and cant always find the ingredients ,

  3. #3
    Thailand Expat nedwalk's Avatar
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    looks good old mate...the good clue is TIME!! and cold temps.. try 2% sea salt of flour weight..and about 1,2% for your yeast

  4. #4
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    Nawty's Avatar
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    great thread with pics....cheers.

    You said the crust was moist...what that mean ? Not crusty and crunchy...I like crusty.

  5. #5
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    El Gibbon's Avatar
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    Think I said the "crumb" was moist. Crumb is the texture.

    Had some with breaky this AM, toasted, flocking great stuff, makes a good sandwich also.

    For a crunchy crust make a wash with a table spoon of cornstarch and 1/4 1/3 cup of water. Brush it on. Think you can use an egg wash also.

    After futzzing around with types of flour I'm sticking with bread flour. Makes for a nice chewy slice, toasts well and holds up/together in a sandwich. The higher level of protein (gluten generator) just makes for a much more pleasing eating experience.

    Ned brings up a great point that I have learned the hard way!

    Time is possible THE most important ingredient in a lot of baking recipes. Don't short cut.

    E. G.

  6. #6
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    Thai Pom's Avatar
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    The Breadman strikes again!!! Good looking loaf.

  7. #7
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    Happyman's Avatar
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    31-01-2011 @ 09:29 PM
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    Nice one E.G.!

    I do one nearly the same but when it comes to the folding bit I add a sprinkle of cheese! ( grate it fine and leave it out for a day to 'dry off a bit' so it crumbles into little grains).
    Bloody great for toasted bacon or ham sandwiches !


  8. #8
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    there is an easier way to make sour dough. if you can get organic rye flour. you basically mix it with a little water and allow to stand in a natural environment for 2 days. the rye flour will absorb natural yeast from the air. after this you make a basic bread mix and when that dough is ready to prove you swap half the fresh mix for half the sour. the sour is then topped up with the other half and keep in a sealed tub in the fridge for next. as long as you remember to replace what youve taken from the sour with fresh mix youll never run out.

  9. #9
    Thailand Expat
    El Gibbon's Avatar
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    ^ yep agree. You don't need to use rye though, any bread flour will work.

    I wasn't trying to make a sourdough recipe, rather to have some of the flour get hydralized (Begin to start forming some gluten) and to let some of the gases released slowly by the yeast to begin flavoring the dough.

    The idea was to get a good solid recipe for an all purpose loaf, good for toast, samwiches and plain old bread and butter.

    Next up will be a loaf of rye.

    E. G.

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