Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 39
  1. #1
    Thailand Expat
    DrAndy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Last Online
    25-03-2014 @ 05:29 PM
    Location
    yes
    Posts
    32,028

    Bake your own bread

    For those of you who miss good bread, and don't have a decent baker in your area, this is a simple guide to making your own bread

    This is what you will need, although you can forget the tins if you want to make rolls (these can just be put on a baking sheet, or foil)



    1.5kg Strong flour (up to you, Granary, wholemeal, white)
    15ml salt (3 tsp), 10ml sugar (2tsp)
    30g butter/hard veg fat/olive oil or mixture
    Yeast; Use a sachet of dry yeast, or find some fresh
    800ml warm water (say, 1 part boiling, 2 parts cool)

    Mix the dry yeast with a little warm water and a little sugar and leave until foaming, before using. This takes about 15mins in a warm place

    Grease the tins and keep in a warm place

    Then make the dough

    In a warm bowl, mix flour, salt and sugar. Rub in the fat and stir in the yeast

    Add 3/4 of the warm water and hand mix to a soft dough. If the dough feels fine, don't add the rest of the water, if it is not soft enough, add some more until it feels flexible but not sticky



    Knead the dough for 10 minutes on a floured surface by stretching and folding...this is a therapeutic stage!

    Divide the dough and put into the warmed, greased tins; fill each tin about 3/4 full



    For rolls, make small balls and put onto an oiled baking sheet

    Leave the dough in the tins in a warm place for say, 1 hour until the dough has doubled in size. This will depend on the flour too, wholemeal will not rise so much.

    Meanwhile, heat the oven to hot, 230C, gas Mk8 or 450F

    When risen, brush the top with salted water, for a nice crust

    you can then put some seeds on if you want, I have used sunflower and pine




    so, this is todays batch




    Put into the centre of your hot oven

    the rolls will take about 15 mins, the loaves about 30 mins

    Remove from oven and turn out. If you tap the bottom of the loaf it should sound hollow when cooked




    Leave to cool on a griddle




    If you can't wait, and don't mind risking indigestion, have some NOW with unsalted butter
    I have reported your post

  2. #2
    Member

    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Last Online
    06-05-2017 @ 07:08 PM
    Posts
    435
    a great thread but i have aways found it better to let the dough rise first in the bowl then knock it back and knead then place in the tins to raise again before baking. Gives it a bit more height and the inside isn't as doughy.

  3. #3
    Thailand Expat nedwalk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Last Online
    06-07-2016 @ 05:28 PM
    Location
    sunshine coast
    Posts
    7,710
    ^ indeed, an intermediate pooofing, and if you can let them proof in a nice moist enviroment as well, cold water is better, and for a better flavour look up FF,S starter wort, 2% salt for taste, if you are getting holes in your loaves, cut them into 4 piece sections and turn em into each of their ends and then place in the pan and then up to you re seeds etc, good thread DR A

  4. #4
    Thailand Expat
    peterpan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Pleasantville
    Posts
    10,109
    Can tell your an Ex Baker Neddy,
    where? I had a 50% share in a Hotbread shop in Main Beach, sadly before it became trendy.

    I always use a preferment, gives a softer crumb and better, well rounded flavour.

    Forgive my comment but, You will get better results Dr A if you ditched the iodized salt and used kosher or natural salt.

  5. #5
    Thailand Expat nedwalk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Last Online
    06-07-2016 @ 05:28 PM
    Location
    sunshine coast
    Posts
    7,710
    was/is me trade and pastry, managed an instore for one of the majors in the NT for years, and always worked here in there as money required miss the trade but not the hours, i got a sweet little gig at the moment arvo shift 4 days a week no OT and no weekends, give em my 2cents worth and walk out the door, make me real liveing with me other stuff, property, solar/grid connect/hotwater systems,
    bet you wish you had the hot bread shop now eh, worth a motza, probably owned by vietnamese now,,
    i always start me doughs with a starter, the young blokes took a while to catch on, but their onto it now, same as how to get the most out of formulas to reduce waste, fuck me the amount of stuff they were throwing away, when i got lured in to 'give a hand' the owner was stumped as to how much i showed her, silly bitch should have stuck to school teaching, thought she could buy a million dollar business and retire to noosa, she,s learning now

  6. #6
    Thailand Expat
    DrAndy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Last Online
    25-03-2014 @ 05:29 PM
    Location
    yes
    Posts
    32,028
    I agree with the second rise, but this was a quick method for beginners

    Quote Originally Posted by nedwalk
    and for a better flavour look up FF
    He makes different bread, but good (personal experience!)

  7. #7
    Thailand Expat
    DrAndy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Last Online
    25-03-2014 @ 05:29 PM
    Location
    yes
    Posts
    32,028
    Quote Originally Posted by nedwalk
    indeed, an intermediate pooofing,
    blimey, you have to use your hands not your....

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Last Online
    30-01-2018 @ 03:45 PM
    Location
    P'Lok
    Posts
    98
    FC UK and I thought my Bread machine was good...great report. Thanks and will try 2morrow

  9. #9
    Member ThaiAm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Last Online
    08-03-2016 @ 11:26 AM
    Location
    khamtakla, Sakon Nakorn
    Posts
    161
    I used to teach bread baking and here are a couple rules that we used for field type baking where you did not have the advantage of controlled environment.

    Use ice cold water, even use some ice as liquid in the mixing of the dough. Ideal temp is around 80 F when coming out of mixer.

    Let bread rise for 90 minutes but better keep tabs on it by making slight indention in the risen dough and if it springs back needs more levening and if the impression remains it is ready to punch down. Then you should note the time that it took to rise and divide that by 3 and let it rise again for that amount of time. Example first rise 90 minutes, second after punch down 30 minutes and then prepare it for panning and let it rise again to the stage where it will retain the impression. It is then ready for the oven.

    Hope you can use some of this to incorporate in your process and end up with a little bit better bread.

    Thanks for sharing your process.

  10. #10
    Thailand Expat

    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Last Online
    17-02-2012 @ 04:10 PM
    Posts
    1,304
    ThaiAm what do you reckon about retarding the dough in the fridge after using ice cold water, ?

  11. #11
    Thailand Expat
    DrAndy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Last Online
    25-03-2014 @ 05:29 PM
    Location
    yes
    Posts
    32,028
    Quote Originally Posted by ThaiAm
    here are a couple rules that we used for field type baking
    Quote Originally Posted by ThaiAm
    Ideal temp is around 80 F when coming out of mixer.
    Seems to me you are talking big bread...a mixer in the field!?

    The point of making bread at home is the therapeutic kneading, that is a great part of it all, then the eating, of course

    so throw those electric bread making things away, do it by hand, it ain't difficult

    all that other stuff, with the jargon, just makes a mystery of what is, essentially, a simple process. That is the point of this thread, to introduce a simple bread making process without the tech stuff AT HOME

    after making bread for a while, then they can start to try different things to improve it...although it will be good to start with

    mine is, I can't stop eating it. I had some toasted this morning with my coffee, really nutty and delicious

  12. #12
    Member ThaiAm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Last Online
    08-03-2016 @ 11:26 AM
    Location
    khamtakla, Sakon Nakorn
    Posts
    161
    Sorry DrAndy I seem to have offended you and for sure did not intend my comments to make that happen, but rather intended to offer some more or less expert additions to your process.

    The mixer I refer to can be any kind of mixer including hand mixer. The comments apply to small or large bread making processes.

    I am sorry for offending you and for that reason wish that I had not made any comments even though I was trying to do the same thing you were doing, which is to share your knowledge with the board.

    Please forgive me.

  13. #13
    Member ThaiAm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Last Online
    08-03-2016 @ 11:26 AM
    Location
    khamtakla, Sakon Nakorn
    Posts
    161
    Quote Originally Posted by TSR2 View Post
    ThaiAm what do you reckon about retarding the dough in the fridge after using ice cold water, ?
    We only recommended the use of ice water if it was really hot outside or in non airconditioned environments, since the ice would be melted before the mixing process could be completed the result would be a dough that is a bit cooler than it would have otherwise been.

    Retarding the dough in fridge would require careful monitoring but should present no problem. We would often put almost ready for oven buns, cinnamon rolls etc in the fridge so it would be a quick process in the morning to bring them out and wait for them aclimate and then pop them in the oven.

  14. #14
    Thailand Expat nedwalk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Last Online
    06-07-2016 @ 05:28 PM
    Location
    sunshine coast
    Posts
    7,710
    ^ jaysus mate, enough of the apologies, you made some good valid input, don,t be sorry for that, we all try to give our 2 bobs worth don,t sweat it, anyway it seems there are a few old dough hands here, i personally like the grain breads with all sorts of seeds and stuff

    Quote Originally Posted by DrAndy
    blimey, you have to use your hands not your....
    lets not go into how we put the holes in the doughnuts

  15. #15
    Thailand Expat

    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Last Online
    17-02-2012 @ 04:10 PM
    Posts
    1,304
    Quote Originally Posted by nedwalk
    lets not go into how we put the holes in the doughnuts
    Or Crimp the Tarts

  16. #16
    Thailand Expat

    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Last Online
    17-02-2012 @ 04:10 PM
    Posts
    1,304
    Quote Originally Posted by ThaiAm
    Retarding the dough
    Retarding the dough for 3/4 hours in the fridge improves the flavour, crumb structure, and lightness of the bread, which is always a problem with home made bread,
    Simply remove from fridge mould and allow to rise then bake

  17. #17
    Thailand Expat
    peterpan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Pleasantville
    Posts
    10,109
    Quote Originally Posted by TSR2 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by ThaiAm
    Retarding the dough
    Retarding the dough for 3/4 hours in the fridge improves the flavour, crumb structure, and lightness of the bread, which is always a problem with home made bread,
    Simply remove from fridge mould and allow to rise then bake
    I'm not convinced about that, a better way (I think) is to reduce the amount of yeast to prolong proof time.
    The harder you make yeast work, the more flavour seems to be generated.
    I use 5 grms of dry active yeast per batch, a batch is enough for a kilo of finished bread.
    This needs 2 hrs first and a 4 to 5 hrs hr final proof, gives the best result for me.

  18. #18
    Northern Hermit
    friscofrankie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Chiangmai, Thailand
    Posts
    7,527
    Quote Originally Posted by ThaiAm
    Retarding the dough in fridge would require careful monitoring
    ???
    Stick in the fridge, go to bed, wake up, take it out. Allow to warm to room temperature, continue to rise or; Cook it and eat it!

    Does anyone that bakes bread at home actually let the bread cool before they slice off a hunk, slather butter on it and eat it?

    If people actually do that, they gotta be in a very small minority. Whenever I mention baking bread I always hear, "I just love fresh bread warm/hot from the oven." Are hot dinner rolls different from "regular" bread? Why is it OK to eat them hot?
    When the people fear their government, there is tyranny; when the government fears the people, there is liberty -- T. Jefferson


  19. #19
    Thailand Expat

    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Last Online
    17-02-2012 @ 04:10 PM
    Posts
    1,304
    Quote Originally Posted by friscofrankie
    I just love fresh bread warm/hot from the oven."

    Agreed

  20. #20
    Thailand Expat
    El Gibbon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Last Online
    01-07-2017 @ 03:32 PM
    Location
    Udon Thani
    Posts
    2,109
    "There is no such thing as a bad loaf of Bread!" This from the renowned bread baker - James Beard. "Some are just better than others." His fine book, Beard on Bread, can be found used on the net, a great source of knowledge and recipes.

    I've had my mistakes as I am sure anyone who has attempted it has. The results in my case made great dipping sticks for stew on one occasion and on others made great snack bits with cheese.

    Each person's favorite methods usually result in bread that is suitable for them. Frankie has his style, I have mine ( demonstrated in another thread), I've gleaned tips from a lot of different sources from the web, to books to this forum - tried a lot and found a few that worked for me.

    This is the first time I've come across "COLD" water usage in bread. I had always thought that the dry yeast I use needed a warm water to start the processing of the enzymes, learn something new every day. ( I don't proof my yeast, as I've never had a problem with dry yeast.)

    I will try it today as Thai Pom has requested some rye bread for Rueben Sandwiches.

    Thanks to the OP for starting this, there seems to be a lot more bread makers than when I did a similar article some time ago.

    E. G.

    EDIT: comment on proofing
    "If you can't stand the answer --
    Don't ask the question!"

  21. #21
    Thailand Expat
    Marmite the Dog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Last Online
    08-09-2014 @ 10:43 AM
    Location
    Simian Islands
    Posts
    34,827
    Quote Originally Posted by El Gibbon
    I will try it today as Thai Pom has requested some rye bread for Rueben Sandwiches.
    Are you two still going strong? Good to hear as you make a lovely couple.

  22. #22
    Thailand Expat

    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Last Online
    17-02-2012 @ 04:10 PM
    Posts
    1,304
    Quote Originally Posted by DrAndy
    without the tech stuff AT HOME

    Adding Ice Cool Water is high tech???

  23. #23
    Thailand Expat
    DrAndy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Last Online
    25-03-2014 @ 05:29 PM
    Location
    yes
    Posts
    32,028
    Quote Originally Posted by ThaiAm
    Sorry DrAndy I seem to have offended you
    Quote Originally Posted by nedwalk
    jaysus mate, enough of the apologies,
    exactly, I was not offended just trying to keep the thread on track for first timers

  24. #24
    Thailand Expat
    DrAndy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Last Online
    25-03-2014 @ 05:29 PM
    Location
    yes
    Posts
    32,028
    Quote Originally Posted by TSR2 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by DrAndy
    without the tech stuff AT HOME

    Adding Ice Cool Water is high tech???
    might be, for some of us

    once again, the introduction of additional techniques can be done later, once someone has made their first batch and enjoyed doing so

    actually, I have never added ice water as I thought yeast likes a warm environment. As you may have noticed, I specified warm bowl, warm tins etc to keep the yeast happy

    and retarding the dough in a fridge? If that improves the dough, then I will try it. But it may be just for convenience, so that the bread can be cooked later

  25. #25
    Thailand Expat

    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Last Online
    17-02-2012 @ 04:10 PM
    Posts
    1,304
    Andy Many years ago there were many dough systems, like Sponge and Dough where all the water plus 50% of the flour were left to ferment for 12 hours so as to develope the gluten, develope flavour and break down the starches into sugar (Diastase Enzyme) so that the yeast can feed and produce the gases plus Ethyl and Methyl Alcohol. ( which can make you drunk as well as mad, hence Barmy, Barm being the old name for yeast. )
    The retard system replicates the above system maybe 50% ,

    Just thinking I started my Bakery National Diploma course at Blackpool Tech 50 years ago this August, FFCCKK Me

    Ps The quality of the flour is most important, sadly its not readily available retail, Modern Commercial flour has additives to improve quality that,s why you can use French and English soft flours for bread, 50 years ago only usefull for confectionary
    Last edited by TSR2; 30-04-2009 at 05:49 PM.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •