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  1. #1
    Thailand Expat
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    Cast iron cookware

    To add more flavor to my upcoming BBQ grill, I have bought some cast iron cookware to bring back to Thailand.

    It does take some experience to use cast iron but the end results are worth it. Here you can see an 8qt. Dutch oven, a 15" skillet and a griddle. Your looking at a little over 100 bucks.

    Now all I have to do is to pack and tote this stuff upcountry.


  2. #2
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    peterpan's Avatar
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    Yr excess baggage bill is going to be wicked
    I have a couple of griddle and fry pans in CI, does a good job alright and when they are properly conditioned, better than Teflon for non stick properties.

  3. #3
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    friscofrankie's Avatar
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    bring me a set.

  4. #4
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    Yea, sure. The airline is already charging me $200 for an extra bag.

  5. #5
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    I remember the good 'ol days when CI cookware was quite standard, not a novelty and in fact a bit mundane as the premium stuff was made from Stainless.

    My mum tossed all hers because it was too heavy.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by hillbilly View Post
    Yea, sure. The airline is already charging me $200 for an extra bag.
    That will be 500 Dollars when the weigh the bag

  7. #7
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    Here is some history about cast iron cookware.


    Cast iron is basically iron that is poured into a mold to create some useful implement. Cast iron pots and pans are made in this way. Pots and cauldrons were originally made from brass because iron could not be worked until furnaces creating heat enough to melt it were invented (about 513 B.C. in China and not until 1100 A.D. or so in England). At this point, pots could be made by making molds out of sand and pouring molting metal into the mold.

    The original cooking pots generally had three legs because they were designed to be used over an open fire. Cooking in the home was done in the hearth or fireplace. Stoves with tops for cooking did not come into common usage until the 1700s. This allowed tremendous advancement in cookware, especially cast iron cooking when pots and pans began to be made in mass quantities.

    By 1776 Adam Smith, in his book, The Wealth of Nations, could note that the actual wealth of the nation was not its gold but in its manufacture of pots and pans. Cast iron cookware was highly valued in the 18th century. George Washington's mother thought so much of her cookware she made special note to bequeath her cast iron in her will. In their expedition to the Louisiana territory in 1804, Lewis and Clark indicated that their cast iron Dutch oven was one of their most important pieces of equipment.

    History - Cast Iron Cooking

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by hillbilly
    Dutch oven
    Sorry, I'll get my coat.

    My wife hates the Dutch Oven. Sorry couldn't resist.

  9. #9
    I am in Jail

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    OK, how do Y'All clean CI pans? Years ago, I had a male housemate who laughed when I was washing one CI frypan in soapy water. No! he said. You wipe it out, then add some water and slap it back on the fire. When the water has sizzled up, it's clean and ready for the next meal. And keeps the seasoning.
    What do you reckon?

  10. #10
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    He is right, once seasoned it should never see soap and water and if it does then it has to be reseasoned.
    I used my Grandmas Dutch oven and fry pans that was given to my wife and when she died I got it and when I came here I gave it and my late wifes recipes and cook books to a good friend of ours who is my Dr. nurse practitioner there..
    But I did by a set of heavy Gage Stainless with 9 thin sheets of pure copper encapsulated into the bottoms and it is waterless but stuff does stick when cooking, specially meat til it gets to cooking and if you use to much fire you will fuck up your grub.
    But if used correctly it is waterless and a tank of cooking gas will last for a year.
    But I paid $200 on sale and $180 postage to get it here , so I damn near paid full price for it once it was in my kitchen here,
    But I see that Thai do have some encap stuff but has an aluminum sheet in the encapsulation, but a friend used mine, then found his at MAKRO so bought it for about $100 he says.
    But my Dutch oven was for stove use, and I see Hillys has the ash lid that holds the hot coals on top when camp cooking, but the one I had spent lots of time covered up underground when cooking in camp.

    For those that want to give it a shot and don't know how.
    Dig a hole bigger and deeper than your pot, close to the main fire, shovel hot coals into hole or build a fire in it and let burn down to coals, put your meat or steaks in the bottom of the dutch oven, then your spuds onions and what ever else you are having for supper or just your cake or biscuits, add what moisture or oil and what ever you are cooking, now with the pot ready, set it in the hole on top of the coals and shovel the rest of the coals in until your pot is covered, then cover with about 6 inches [10 cm] of dirt and go off fishing, hunting or rock collecting or playing stink finger til 6 or so hrs have passed, longer if you wish as it will hurt nothing, then at supper time dig your supper up. brush off the lid and the groove where it fit the base so no dirt gets in your grits, and have a very good supper.

  11. #11
    Days Work Done! Norton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jet Gorgon
    What do you reckon?
    ^What he said.

  12. #12
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    ^^ hims right again.
    We be calling that a "camp oven" BG. Got nothing to do with poofs though. Check out the step by steps on WK's desert thread.
    http://teakdoor.com/australia-new-ze...he-desert.html

    I taught him everything he knows about bush cookin.

  13. #13
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    The worst thing about my mothers death was that my cousin stole all her cast iron cookware. Beautiful things they were, over 40 years old.

  14. #14
    I am in Jail

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    ^ Makes you hate family. I know.

  15. #15
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    The ones I gave away that had been my grannys were over 100 years old when I got em.
    and just as good, no better than new, as they improve with use.

  16. #16
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    One of these are nice to fry steaks in.

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