Results 1 to 21 of 21
  1. #1
    I am in Jail

    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Last Online
    22-11-2011 @ 08:27 AM
    Location
    Christian Country
    Posts
    15,020

    Add Salt -- Before or After Cooking?

    Just read some web recipes lately that say salt should be added after cooking -- ie, salt toughens meat, flavour is better when added after to anything. Hmmm, I always seasoned meat beforehand and add salt to whatever I am cooking when I start it.
    What do you think?

  2. #2
    Thailand Expat
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    60,017
    add afterwards, if needed.

    adding before means that the meal is already salty.

  3. #3
    I am in Jail

    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Last Online
    22-11-2011 @ 08:27 AM
    Location
    Christian Country
    Posts
    15,020
    ^ It's my own cooking, not out of a can! If I don't add it, it would taste like baby food.

  4. #4
    On a walkabout
    Loy Toy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Last Online
    Today @ 12:39 PM
    Posts
    28,389
    Quote Originally Posted by Jet Gorgon
    salt toughens meat
    I think that is a good enough reason to add salt later Jettie.

    Never heard of that toughening claim before though!

  5. #5
    Thailand Expat
    Marmite the Dog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Last Online
    08-09-2014 @ 10:43 AM
    Location
    Simian Islands
    Posts
    34,827
    All the chefs I see on the telly season the food before cooking.

  6. #6
    Thailand Expat
    Thai Pom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Last Online
    25-07-2019 @ 01:37 PM
    Location
    Back in BKK
    Posts
    1,856
    You can always add salt, but once it is in the dish your screwed!!

  7. #7
    Pedantic bastard
    nidhogg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    14,667
    Quote Originally Posted by Jet Gorgon View Post
    Just read some web recipes lately that say salt should be added after cooking -- ie, salt toughens meat, flavour is better when added after to anything. Hmmm, I always seasoned meat beforehand and add salt to whatever I am cooking when I start it.
    What do you think?
    Depends upon the cooking? Grill etc I would season before, but casseroles etc I would season during cooking. Food that needs to be seasoned after cooking has not been prepared correctly!

  8. #8
    I am in Jail

    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Last Online
    22-11-2011 @ 08:27 AM
    Location
    Christian Country
    Posts
    15,020
    ^ OK, got me there, NH. Season "during" cooking?
    If I cook stews or soups and use bouillion cubes, I never add salt. I usually make most stuff myself because the canned/pkged stuff here is loaded with sodium.

  9. #9
    Member

    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Last Online
    02-08-2011 @ 07:48 PM
    Posts
    53
    I think what you may have seen is the suggestion that seasoning (adding salt to meat before cooking) draws out the moisture so in theory that means it toughens up. However, if you do this just before cooking it really is insignificant. You will see people saying different things re seasoning but normally I would season 'during' cooking for liquid (tasting as you go along) and 'before' for meat.

  10. #10
    Member beano's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Last Online
    14-05-2018 @ 02:42 PM
    Posts
    821
    Quote Originally Posted by Thai Pom View Post
    You can always add salt, but once it is in the dish your screwed!!
    Yeah, I add a little to start with then keep adding a little at a time and tasting as the meat cooks.

  11. #11
    RIP
    blackgang's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Last Online
    08-07-2010 @ 08:33 PM
    Location
    Phetchabun city
    Posts
    15,471
    I salt after when char broiling, but season anytime I want to and do taste as I go along, but meat usually will need salt at the table when I cook it. as well as fresh ground pepper..

  12. #12
    Northern Hermit
    friscofrankie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Chiangmai, Thailand
    Posts
    7,527
    Any food like sauces, casserole, soups, gravies, etc that does not need a touch of final seasoning at teh table is over salted during cooking. Salt cooked into a dish inthe last few moments of cooking can round out and enhance flavors but it takes a bit more salt if it is cooked in for hours you wilhave more salt in your food than if yuo just added it at the end and let the people eating adjust to their own tastes.

    I have used salt based rubs on roasts; this is a coating on the outside of the meat, generally on the fat and the meat is usually not sliced 1 - 1&1/2 inch thick. Salt can pull moisture out of steak if rubbed or sprinkled on and left for a few minutes before it is cooked. Once the steak is seared, you can sprinkle a bit of salt and cracked pepper on while it finishes, it if you like. I prefer to salt my steaks after they're on my plate. See no reason to add salt to most food while cooking them except the sauces, soups and gravies and only as I am adjusting the flavors before serviing. A little salt just before taking from the heat can help to meld flavors slightly without breaking down teh individual flavors completely. Tomato sauces, in particular, can benefit from a few grains of salt like this.

    I like the flavor of salt on my food, very much. Cooking too much in for too long cloaks the flavor and can take a wonderfully flavored soup, gravy, sauce or casserole and turn it into a bland, homogeneous bowl of blah. I do not add salt to casseroles or meatloaves unti l I eat them.

    I will brine pork, turkey or chickens in a very mild brine solution before cooking them some times. The meat is succulent not salty.

    I'll say again; any thing served to the table that doesn;t need a touch of seasoning (salt & pepper) has been over seasoned while cooking, IMO.
    When the people fear their government, there is tyranny; when the government fears the people, there is liberty -- T. Jefferson


  13. #13
    សុខសប្បាយ
    EmperorTud's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Last Online
    11-12-2009 @ 11:23 PM
    Location
    75 clicks above the Do Lung bridge
    Posts
    6,665
    Quote Originally Posted by friscofrankie
    I'll say again; any thing served to the table that doesn;t need a touch of seasoning (salt & pepper) has been over seasoned while cooking, IMO.
    Spoken like a true American.

    European chefs get annoyed if you salt their food at the table as it should be perfectly seasoned on arrival. It is seen as an insult to the chef in France and Italy.

  14. #14
    Knows fok all
    daveboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Kent
    Posts
    5,222
    I've always added salt during cooking. You have a little taste and decide if its needed or not.

  15. #15
    Northern Hermit
    friscofrankie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Chiangmai, Thailand
    Posts
    7,527
    Fuck the chefs. How do they know my tastes? They are cooking for me I want salt I'll salt the fucker if I want to.

  16. #16
    Thailand Expat
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    8,184
    I also use salt before, during and after depending on what I am cooking.

    That very basic item on your kitchen counter is the next trend in culinary - gourmet salts. Regular iodized salt and kosher salt may be common to you, but there are new gourmet salts now entering the culinary landscape. In today's episode of Cooking Coarse, the online video cooking course, Chef Todd Mohr will recount the bloody history of salt, how salt is made, what effects the color of salt, why different gourmet salts have unique tastes. You'll see red Hawaiian salt, black mountain gourmet salt, smoked gourmet river salt, pink salt, as well as grey natural salt, and what dishes to use gourmet salts in.


  17. #17
    Thailand Expat
    Marmite the Dog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Last Online
    08-09-2014 @ 10:43 AM
    Location
    Simian Islands
    Posts
    34,827
    Quote Originally Posted by friscofrankie
    Fuck the chefs. How do they know my tastes?
    European chefs don't care what your tastes are; they're cooking for their own ego.

  18. #18
    The cold, wet one
    November Rain's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Last Online
    31-03-2015 @ 03:06 PM
    Location
    In my happy place
    Posts
    12,214
    Before & (more often) during. Never after. Like you say, Jettie, you're cooking for yourself & know your tastes. Seasonings should be allowed to develop in cooking time.

  19. #19
    I am in Jail
    Lily's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Last Online
    14-05-2014 @ 05:06 PM
    Posts
    6,815
    Quote Originally Posted by friscofrankie
    Cooking too much in for too long cloaks the flavor and can take a wonderfully flavored soup, gravy, sauce or casserole and turn it into a bland, homogeneous bowl of blah. I do not add salt to casseroles or meatloaves unti l I eat them.
    I do the exact opposite of that. I don't put salt on any grilled or roasted meat before I cook it but things that have several ingredients like mentioned above, gravy, meatloaf or casseroles, I think need salt during the cooking process. You cant add enough salt after, if it hasn't been cooked in, I believe.

  20. #20
    Days Work Done! Norton's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Roiet
    Posts
    30,009
    Quote Originally Posted by Jet Gorgon
    What do you think?
    I think it depends on what your cooking. To a great degree I agree with Frankie. For stews, beans, chili and the like I never salt until the last few minutes of cooking.

  21. #21
    I am in Jail

    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Last Online
    22-11-2011 @ 08:27 AM
    Location
    Christian Country
    Posts
    15,020
    Intteresting. Actually, I rarely add salt to dishes as I often add soya sauce or something with salt in it. For steaks and chicken, I sprinkle salt with whatever spices before cooking. Understand now about how it will draw out the moisture. Thanks, Ossies.

    Quote Originally Posted by EmperorTud View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by friscofrankie
    I'll say again; any thing served to the table that doesn;t need a touch of seasoning (salt & pepper) has been over seasoned while cooking, IMO.
    Spoken like a true American.

    European chefs get annoyed if you salt their food at the table as it should be perfectly seasoned on arrival. It is seen as an insult to the chef in France and Italy.
    In polite society, you always spoon a bit of salt and pepper on your plate and dip accordingly to avoid embarrassing the hostess. Most restaurants always put too much salt and spices IMO.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •