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  1. #1
    Tiger Bay
    CharleyFarley's Avatar
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    Ducks - recipes wanted

    Just had a peek at mrsQ's thread and am hoping for a similar sensible and informative response here please.

    We are /have just killed 2 of my ducks, both 4 kilos dead weight.

    The plan is eat duck on Xmas day.

    I've got the basic ingredient for the sauce..........Grand Marnier.
    "The supreme irony of life is that hardly anyone gets out of it alive."

  2. #2
    Tiger Bay
    CharleyFarley's Avatar
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    C'mon guys and gals, help me out.

    Anyway the dead ducks are now de-feathered, gutted, and had their head and legs chopped off. Four kilos becomes 2.7 kilos.

    Enough for four people isn't it?

    I must say their chests don't feel that meaty. Shall I cook them both on Xmas day?

  3. #3
    Thailand Expat jandajoy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CharleyFarley
    Shall I cook them both on Xmas day?
    yes. have you tried your old friend mr. google for ideas?

    have you got an oven?

  4. #4
    Thailand Expat jandajoy's Avatar
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    Roast duck

    Search for similar recipes...
    Serves 4
    Cooking Time Prep time 20 mins, cook 2 hours


    Roast duck 1 (about 2.2kg) duck 1 onion, quartered 1 bunch sage 600 gm desiree potatoes, peeled and halved Sautéed cabbage 50 gm butter 1 red onion, thinly sliced ¼ tsp caraway seeds ¼ savoy cabbage, cored and thickly sliced 125 ml (½ cup) apple juice Cider apple sauce 500 ml (2 cups) dry apple cider (see note) 1 tbsp cider vinegar 1 tbsp brown sugar 30 gm cold butter, cubed




    1 Preheat oven to 180C. Rinse duck inside and out with cold running water and pat dry with absorbent paper. Place on a wire rack placed in a roasting pan. Using a skewer prick duck breast all over, piercing skin. Season skin and cavity with sea salt and freshly ground black pepper, then place onion and sage into cavity. 2 Roast duck for 30 minutes, add potatoes, turning to coat in rendered duck fat, then continue to cook for 30 minutes. Reduce heat to 150C and cook for another 1½ hours or until golden and skin is crisp. 3 For sautéed cabbage, heat butter in a large frying pan until foamy, add onion and caraway seeds and cook over low-medium heat for 5 minutes or until soft. Add cabbage, increase heat to medium-high and sauté for 5 minutes or until wilted, add apple juice and cook for 2-3 minutes or until cabbage is tender, season to taste. 4 For cider apple sauce, reduce apple cider in a saucepan over high heat for 8 minutes or until reduced to about ¼ cup, add vinegar and sugar and simmer for 2 minutes. Whisk in cold butter a piece at a time to thicken and season to taste. 5 Carve duck and serve with potatoes and cabbage, drizzled with cider apple sauce.

    Note Use alcoholic dry apple cider, available from most liquor stores.

  5. #5
    Thailand Expat jandajoy's Avatar
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    Roast duck
    • 2 Ducks
    • coarse sea salt
    • 2 Bay leaves
    • 1 sprig Thyme
    • goose fat
    • Salt
    • Ground black Pepper
    beer gravy
    • groundnut oil
    • 2 large sliced Onions
    • 1 tablespoon muscovado brown sugar
    • 250 ml Beer preferably Shepherd Neame 'Spitfire'
    • 300 ml chicken stock
    • 200 ml ready-made veal or beef gravy
    crispy duck hash
    • 50 g finely chopped shallots
    • Olive Oil
    • 3 large baked Potatoes baked until cooked
    • cooked duck leg see above - torn into strips
    • Salt
    • Ground black Pepper
    • 2 knobs Butter
    orange curd carrots
    • 675 g thickly sliced carrots or cut into barrel shapes, allowing three pieces per portion
    • 2 tablespoons ready-made orange curd
    • Butter
    • Salt
    • Ground black Pepper
    spring greens
    • 450 g spring greens stalks removed and leaves torn into pieces
    • knob Butter
    • Salt
    • Ground black Pepper

    Roast duck
    • The duck legs can be baked submerged in goosefat for 1 1/2-2 hours. This protects the flesh from becoming too dry.
    • If roasting as described, the legs placed on a wire rack in a baking tray prevents the flesh from drying and over-crisping.
    • Preheat the oven to 160C/325F/Gas 3.
    • Remove the legs from the ducks.
    • Roast in the oven for 1-1½ hours until completely tender.
    • Remove the meat from the leg bones, discarding any fat and keep to one side.
    • Chop away the central leg carcass from each bird, leaving the two breasts attached to the breast bone.
    • Reserve the breasts.
    • To cook the duck breasts, preheat the oven to 200C/400F/Gas 6.
    • In a non-stick frying pan, gently fry the duck breasts, skin-side down, on the hob.
    • As they fry the fat will melt away, leaving a thinner and crisper finish.
    • Continue to fry until all the breasts are a rich, golden brown colour - this may well take between 10-15 minutes.
    • Turn skin-side up and place in the oven to finish cooking for 6-10 minutes; depending on the size of the ducks.
    • Once roasted, allow to rest.
    beer gravy
    • To make the beer gravy, trim all the fat from the carcasses, then chop them and fry in some groundnut oil in a saucepan until well coloured.
    • Add the sliced onions and continue to fry over a moderate heat to a rich golden brown.
    • Stir in the sugar, then pour the beer on top.
    • Bring to the boil and reduce by three quarters before adding the chicken stock and continuing to boil and reduce by half.
    • Add the veal or beef gravy.
    • Bring back to a simmer, skimming off any excess fat, cooking for a further 30 minutes before straining.
    • Should the sauce be too thin, simply boil to a sauce consistency, but do not allow the flavour to become too strong.
    • Set aside.
    • The sauce can be made well in advance and refrigerated until needed. Reheat for serving.
    crispy duck hash
    • Sweat the chopped shallots in a little of the olive oil until tender.
    • Scoop the potato flesh from the skins and mix it with the cooked shallots and duck leg meat.
    • Season with salt and freshly ground black pepper.
    • Divide the duck hash mix into four and press into buttered rectangular or round moulds, or simply shape into cakes.
    • Fry in butter until golden brown before turning each and roasting in the oven for 8-10 minutes.
    orange curd carrots
    • Cook the carrots in boiling salted water until tender.
    • Once cooked, drain off the water, leaving a few tablespoons in the pan and leave to one side just before serving.
    • Gently stir in the orange curd and butter until completely melted, glazing every slice, and warmed through.
    • Season with salt and freshly ground black pepper.
    • While the carrots are cooking, plunge the spring greens into a large pan of boiling water and cook for a few minutes until tender.
    • Drain.
    spring greens
    • Place the butter into the same saucepan as used for the carrots and once melted, stir in the spring greens, seasoning with salt and freshly ground black pepper.
    To serve
    • Remove the duck breasts from the bone and cut each into three or four slices.
    • Place the hash towards the top of the plate with the carrots and spring greens arranged on either side beneath.
    • Present the duck on top of the greens offering the beer gravy on the side.

  6. #6
    Thailand Expat jandajoy's Avatar
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    Hints and Tips on Roasting Duck


    When roasting a duck, place on a rack in a baking tray so the fat can drain freely.

    Ensure the vent end of the duck is always open. This allows the heat to cook the meat from the inside as well as the outside.

    Never stuff the cavity of a whole duck. This prevents hot air entering the duck cavity.

    A few herbs, zest of an orange or some star anise placed inside the cavity will give a good aroma and add to the flavour when cooking.

    For a crispier skin, wipe the uncooked duck dry with kitchen paper and sprinkle a little salt on the skin.

    Always roast a duck in a hot oven approx 190C.

    Duck reheats really well, so why not cook it the day before, joint it when it's cold and reheat in a hot oven or under the grill for a duck dinner with ease!

    If you reheat the duck and want the skin to be crispier, dab the skin with kitchen paper and place under a hot grill or in the oven.

    Duck, as with all meats and poultry, should rest after cooking to allow the juices to settle. It also makes the meat easier to handle.

    Always serve the sauce on the plate and the duck on top. Putting sauce on the crispy skin will make the skin go soft.

    For a sweet sauce, add a couple of teaspoons of cranberry sauce.

    When making sauce, instead of using water, use orange juice for a quick traditional Duck a l'Orange.

  7. #7
    Thailand Expat jandajoy's Avatar
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  8. #8
    Thailand Expat jandajoy's Avatar
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  9. #9
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    Basic Roast Duck Recipe

    July 22nd, 2008 by alice Tags: Basic, Duck, Roast
    INGREDIENTS

    1. 1whole duck
    2. salt
    3. pepper
    4. water, as needed
    DIRECTIONS

    1. Preheat oven to 500°F.
    2. Check to see if there are is a packet of giblets on the inside of your duck (especially if it is store bought).
    3. Season your duck by rubbing salt and pepper on the outside.
    4. Place the duck in a roasting pan.
    5. Pour in an inch of water.
    6. Remove packaging from giblets and place in the pan.
    7. COVER.
    8. Place in the oven for 90 minutes.
    9. Enjoy!

  10. #10
    I am in Jail

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    Quote Originally Posted by CharleyFarley
    Four kilos becomes 2.7 kilos. Enough for four people isn't it?
    Just about. I hope you haven't invited any greedy fat expat slobs.

    Have you considered doing a casserole with veges and things?

  11. #11
    DaffyDuck
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    Quote Originally Posted by CharleyFarley View Post
    C'mon guys and gals, help me out.
    Sorry - can't help you with that :-(

  12. #12
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    If you have to kill a tough old drake or rooster, they can still make a nice tender meal if treated right.

    After plucking and gutting you need to "hang" the bird. This means hanging it up in a cool place to let it age, which helps break down some of the tough muscle fibers. In the cooler countries I think they used to hang game birds for several days. But in a hot climate I only leave it overnight. Place a bird in a plastic bag to keep the insects and flys off.

    Next thing is to simmer the bird in a large pot of water for at least one hour.

    Then into the oven for some slow cooking for a couple of hours. I like to use those high temp plastic oven bags for baking as they keep the moisture in.
    Two hours per kilo at about 160 to 180 C should so it

    I have cooked old roosters and drakes using this method on a few occasions and they come out nice and tender. Plus the older ones have a much nicer, slightly gamey flavour.

    Its only a little extra work and can turn a tough old bird into a lovely tasty and tender meal.

  13. #13
    Sprayed On Member
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    Did anyone see that cooking show on yesterday lunch time called Beyond the River Cottage or something by a guy called Hugh Fearnley Whittingstall?

    He looked like a bit of a weirdo ex hippy but he made a great Ten Bird Roast where he stuffed one bird inside another plus a load of goose fat and stuffing. Birds were.
    • Woodcock, inside a
    • Partridge, inside a
    • Pigeon, inside a
    • Pheasant, inside a
    • Guinea, fowl inside a
    • Mallard, inside a
    • Chicken, inside a
    • Aylesbury Duck, inside a
    • Goose, inside a
    • Turkey
    Not sure how long the cooking time was and the birds were hard to source but it looked bloody lovely when it was done.

    BTW he boned all the birds (calm down Nawty) so that they fitted inside each other. I couldn't see the method because of the camera angle buy it was impressive how he took the whiole carcus out of the bird leaving only the leg and wing bones inside to keep it in some sort of shape. I grew up in a butchers but have never seen that done before.

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