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  1. #1
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    Cheap Western food at home!

    I can cook at home but I also realize that many of you do not have a proper kitchen. However, you can still cook and enjoy a decent Western dinner at home with just an electric griddle and a steam pot.

    The electric griddle can be bought for under B1,00 and a 2-layer steamer for about B300. Buy your choice of veggies and a hunk of meat. Put the meat in the lower tray, the veggies in the upper tray and in about an hour or so you can have a healthy Western-style meal.

    Thai food is great but sometimes it is enjoyable to eat a cheap home cooked meal sorta like Mom use to make...
    Last edited by hillbilly; 06-01-2006 at 02:51 PM.

  2. #2
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    Yummy nice mushy gray veggies especially green beans like mom used to make. No for the meats okay Hillbilly, but for the vegetables I will go with a wok or skillet and fry those babies up with some garlic, onion, and oyster sauce.

  3. #3
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    A wok is an excellent way to go in a condo type setting. Cut everything up bitesize, first throw the meat in the wok and brown it up nice. Then toss in the veggies. Give it a shot TD posters, you can do the Western eating at home...

  4. #4
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    The other day got my skillet goin' took some ground pork wiht a bit of finley chopped pork belly added some thyme, garlic, sage ground chillies and touch a this 'n thatt. cooked until brown, added some flour and milk. poured that mess into the rice cooker and freid up some home fries , then scrambled a half dozen eggs.
    Country gravy with taters and eggs
    Was in fuckin' heaven all damn day
    When the people fear their government, there is tyranny; when the government fears the people, there is liberty -- T. Jefferson


  5. #5
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    Do that all the time Frankie, I use the fillet of pork just dusted in flour as the meat portion of the meal.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by friscofrankie
    The other day got my skillet goin' took some ground pork wiht a bit of finley chopped pork belly added some thyme, garlic, sage ground chillies and touch a this 'n thatt. cooked until brown, added some flour and milk. poured that mess into the rice cooker and freid up some home fries , then scrambled a half dozen eggs.
    Country gravy with taters and eggs
    Was in fuckin' heaven all damn day
    Do you accept guests? If so i would like to be first in line...

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by aging one
    Do that all the time Frankie, I use the fillet of pork just dusted in flour as the meat portion of the meal.
    Yeah man, that's dinner! wth mashed taters! But the country sausage all crumbled is enough meat for any meal i've finally gotten over my homesickness for Jimmy dean sausage. Really gotta add that exsta fatty pork-belly to the ground pork here to get a good roux goin' on.

    Hilly- come on up! We can eay country gravy and I'm working on gettin adecent sourdough starter goin so I can make some good skillet biscuits!

  8. #8
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    You gave me the flash man its the pork belly added to the ground pork to make the sausage. Somewhere I have the ratio of sage, black pepper, red pepper, allspice, and perhaps cumin. Going to be hunting for that tomorrow. Perhaps chop up that pork belly mu sam chan, and add a bit of the mu sap as well then blend it up. Ohh man

    By blend I mean stir the spices in. Do not want a damn puree.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by aging one
    Yummy nice mushy gray veggies especially green beans like mom used to make
    first off i thought you were serious, but you perfectly described my childhood food

    now don't get me wrong; i'm not slagging off my old mom but i never want to eat vegies like she used to make

  10. #10
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    I've cooked nearly every night since I was about 13 years old. I think that's why its nice here as I go out EVERY night to get something to eat.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by klongmaster
    Quote Originally Posted by aging one
    Yummy nice mushy gray veggies especially green beans like mom used to make
    first off i thought you were serious, but you perfectly described my childhood food

    now don't get me wrong; i'm not slagging off my old mom but i never want to eat vegies like she used to make
    I know what your saying there Klongy.

    Vegies were meant to be 'al dente'..................yeuch!!

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by aging one
    You gave me the flash man its the pork belly added to the ground pork to make the sausage. Somewhere I have the ratio of sage, black pepper, red pepper, allspice, and perhaps cumin. Going to be hunting for that tomorrow. Perhaps chop up that pork belly mu sam chan, and add a bit of the mu sap as well then blend it up. Ohh man

    By blend I mean stir the spices in. Do not want a damn puree.
    4 parts lean pork ground or not, 1 part pork belly. Chop the living shit out of 'em add your herbs and spices it'll hold a decent patty if you've a mind.

    Quote Originally Posted by Marmite the Dog
    I've cooked nearly every night since I was about 13 years old. I think that's why its nice here as I go out EVERY night to get something to eat.
    Started cooking at 3, potatoes and hotdogs, been cooking all my life. Love cookin' maybe one day when i've got an extra million I wouldn't mind losin' at poker i'd like to open a restaurant/brew pub. Got this idea for a breakfast ale... Go great with that gravy.

  13. #13
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    ^ Can you please explain more on how to make American sausages? I have the pork belly and pork ground down but what about the secret ingredients?

  14. #14
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    I tend to experiment. When I make it I usually make more than i need I'll use Thyme and/or sage, garlic. Chili flakes and someimes allspice. also add black (or white) pepper salt and A smifgen of rice vinegar; but Ive got some recipes:
    onthe game sausage you can substitute pork and try a bit less herbs as the elk meat is kinda strong. A few of these recipes recemmend fresh herbs. I'm not real sold on that to be honest or added fresh ingredients like onion, I even prefer garlic powder when making sausage. For the italian some fresh basil is nice. Couple fo recipes call for mayple syrup or brown sugar; forget that. and leav ouy all that frou-frou shit like bell peppers and sun-fucking dried potatoes, your makin' sausage not some fuckin' prissy little salad.
    My favorite attempt so far was just Thyme, Garlic, chili flakes, salt pepper and a drop of vinegar. I love oregeno, but not in my sausage. Ao likes cumin, one of my favorite flavors but for good ol' biscuts and gravy sausage I'm not so fond of it. Also one of the biggest indregients liste below seems to be allspice. with good thyme/chili garlic you can experiemnt with it.
    If you're gonna store it for a couple days to let the flavors meld, the vinegar can be left out. In any case you should not notice the flavor so much as the herb flavors enhanced.
    I'm shootin' for jimmy Dean-like flavor and with the herbs, garilc and chili I've gotten the closest.
    Check these guys out then throw the fuckin recipes out the window. make a large batch and fry up small patty. adjust the herbs mix it up good and fry up another.
    Ain't no secret ingredient just fuck around with it till you got what you like. Then try 'n 'member what you did!
    Oh, yeah, leave out any fuckin' cheese in the recipes
    Elk Sausage

    4 to 6 pounds elk meat, well-trimmed (or other venison)
    2 to 3 pounds pork fat, well-trimmed (2-1 ratio meat to fat)
    1 tablespoon dry thyme
    1 tablespoon dry oregano
    1 tablespoon dry sage
    2 tablespoons salt
    1 cup finely chopped onion
    1/2 cup finely chopped garlic
    1/2 cup crushed red chili pepper flakes, (optional)
    1 to 2 cups roasted, peeled, and diced green chili peppers (optional)
    Sun-dried tomatoes (optional)
    Additional garlic (optional)
    10 to 15 feet sausage casing
    1/2 cup maple syrup (for breakfast sausage - optional)

    Grind each meat separately then mix together. It is best if you grind the meat when it is very cold. Mix the ground meat together with all the seasonings. Form into small patties. Saute a small piece and test for taste. You may need to adjust the spices. Next, place a length (10 to 15 feet) of sausage casing on a sausage horn and force mixture into casing. Twist sausages in alternating directions to create 6 to 8-inch long sausages. If well protected, finished sausages can be frozen in a non-frost free freezer for up to a year. The sausages can be cooked directly on a grill or sauteed in a pan. For best results, boil sausages first and finish on grill or pan. Can serve with maple syrup.

    Vanison Sausage:

    1/4 cup sugar
    1/4 cup mustard seed (this might be nice crunch 'em up first though)
    1/8 cup garlic powder
    1 cup salt
    1/8 cup black pepper
    12 pounds pork, cubed
    6 pounds venison, cubed
    15 feet pork sausage casing

    In a large metal bowl, mix sugar, mustard seed, garlic, salt, and pepper with pork and venison. When ingredients are well mixed, grind the meat mixture in a meat grinder. Put the ground meat into a mechanical sausage stuffer. Be sure to push all of the air out of stuffer so there are no air pockets in the sausages. Fill pork casing with ground meat. When casing is filled entirely, find the center of the sausage and fold and pinch in 1/2 on a table. Pinch and twist into sausage links 2 at a time, pulling the "leg" of the sausage through the center each time a twist is made.

    Hang sausage in a smoke house or put sausage in a smoker for approximately 8 to 12 hours.



    Hot Italian Sausage

    2 pounds pork butt, cubed
    1 ounce salt
    1/4 ounce black pepper
    1/4 ounce fennel seed
    1/2 ounce garlic powder
    1/4 ounce paprika
    1/2 ounce dried parsley
    1/2 ounce crushed red pepper flakes
    1/4 orange bell pepper, chopped
    1/4 red bell pepper, chopped
    1/4 yellow bell pepper, chopped
    1 ounce cheese of choice
    1 to 2 ounces wine, grappa, or brandy

    1 yard pork or lamb casings

    Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.

    Combine all ingredients, except casings, in a large bowl. Put the meat mixture through a grinder and grind according to manufacturer's instructions. Tie a knot in 1 end of a casing and begin filling the casings with the meat mixture, then tie off the other end of the casing once all the meat has been used. Twist the casing into 6 sausage links.

    Bake sausage for at least 15 minutes. Meanwhile, preheat a grill.

    Remove sausage links from oven and place on grill. Grill until crispy and golden brown. Spice up your favorite pasta recipe by adding sausage slices or enjoy your sausage the old-fashioned way, on a bun topped with your favorite condiments.

    This recipe was provided by professional chefs and has been scaled down from a bulk recipe provided by a restaurant. The Food Network Kitchens chefs have not tested this recipe, in the proportions indicated, and therefore, we cannot make any representation as to the results


    Italian Sausage

    3 pounds well-marbled pork butt, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
    2 tablespoons minced garlic
    1 tablespoon plus 1 1/2 teaspoons paprika
    1 1/2 teaspoons toasted fennel seeds
    1 tablespoon salt
    1 tablespoon freshly cracked black pepper
    1 teaspoon cayenne
    1/2 teaspoon ground anise
    2 tablespoons freshly chopped Italian parsley leaves
    3 tablespoons dry red wine
    Pork casings, optional

    Combine the pork butt, garlic, paprika, fennel seeds, salt, pepper, cayenne, anise, parsley, and red wine in a large bowl and toss well to coat. Refrigerate covered overnight or up to 24 hours.

    Pass the mixture through a meat grinder fitted with a medium die. (Alternately, transfer to a food processor in 2 batches and process until finely ground.) To test the seasoning, heat 1 teaspoon oil in a small skillet, and cook about 2 teaspoons of the mixture. Adjust seasonings, to taste.

    Using the sausage attachment on a mixer, stuff the meat into the casings, if being used. Twist and tie off to make 4-inch sausages. Alternately, shape into patties. Cook sausage in usual manner, making sure the internal temperature of the sausage links reaches at least 150 degrees F. Uncooked sausage can be stored in the refrigerator up to 3 days or freeze and use within 3 months.
    This one looks good, try it without the nutmeg first you can always add it later leave out the sugar skip the rosemary and you'v got a good fuckin' sausage here man!!
    Beakfast Sausage
    2 pounds pork butt (2 1/2 pounds with bone), diced into 1/4-inch pieces
    1/2 pound fat back, diced into 1/4-inch pieces
    2 teaspoons kosher salt
    1 1/2 teaspoons freshly ground black pepper
    2 teaspoons finely chopped fresh sage leaves
    2 teaspoons finely chopped fresh thyme leaves
    1/2 teaspoon finely chopped fresh rosemary leaves
    1 tablespoon light brown sugar
    1/2 teaspoon fresh grated nutmeg
    1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
    1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes

    Italian Sausage:
    1 1/2 teaspoons fennel seed
    2 teaspoons kosher salt
    1 1/2 teaspoons black pepper
    1 tablespoon chopped parsley leaves
    2 pounds pork butt (2 1/2 pounds with bone), diced into 1/4-inch pieces
    5 feet of 36 millimeter collagen casings (do not allow to get wet at any time)
    Shortening, to lubricate nozzle of stuffer

    Special equipment: meat grinder with stuffing attachment or manual stuffer

    Toast fennel seed in medium sized, heavy saute pan over medium heat, constantly moving seeds around in pan until they start to turn light brown, about 5 minutes. Set aside to cool. Once cool, grind seeds and combine with salt, pepper, and chopped parsley in medium mixing bowl. Add pork and blend thoroughly. Refrigerate for 1 hour.

    Using the fine blade of a grinder, grind the pork. After lubricating stuffer or stuffing attachment with shortening, load casing onto attachment, clipping end with a clothespin. Stuff meat into casings, trying to avoid air pockets. After stuffing is finished lay out on counter and tie off end. Pinch and twist to form 4-inch sausages. Wrap in parchment paper and refrigerate for 2 to 3 hours. Store in refrigerator for use within 2 to 3 days or freeze for up to 3 months. If freezing, wrap in aluminum foil. If using immediately, saute over medium heat in a heavy saute pan with 1/4-inch of water. Bring water to boil, put on lid and cook for 10 minutes. Remove lid and continue cooking over medium heat, turning every 2 to 3 minutes until golden brown. Sausage should reach an internal temperature of 150 to 156 degrees F.
    Hope your ol' lady doens't mind you puttin on a pound 'r ten! I have not rtied any of these recipes but I have used them for ideas, suggest you do the same.

  15. #15
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    ^ I made sausages the way you described using various peppers, sage and allspice. Will let you know tomorrow how they turned out.

  16. #16
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    Send one up!
    or bring it.

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    Shit! To much salt. Will try again next weekend. In the mean time listen to the old lady bitch on how much food I wasted. Oh, well...

  18. #18
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    In the quest for Amerikan sausage I have not been able to find a website for Foodland.

    Currently, I am looking for a phone number for Kuhn Lim (HK guy and basically owner).

    Help from anyone would be appreciated.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by hillbilly
    Currently, I am looking for a phone number for Kuhn Lim (HK guy and basically owner).
    funnily enough there's a full page article on him in the Bkk Post today...

    no ph # though

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by klongmaster
    Quote Originally Posted by hillbilly
    Currently, I am looking for a phone number for Kuhn Lim (HK guy and basically owner).
    funnily enough there's a full page article on him in the Bkk Post today...

    no ph # though
    Nor, anyway of contacting Foodland.

    Any suggestions?

  21. #21
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    Once in a while my wife cooks spaghetti or lasagna or cheesburgers and homefries. I don't need food like that every night, but a couple of times a month it really hits the spot! A little off topic, but it's really amazing how bad most western food in Thailand is!

  22. #22
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    Not in Chinagmai. After a couple a years in Bangkok, it was amazing how goo dthe western food is here. Much higher ratio of wesern folks to Thai, more intermingled too.
    Now Hilly, Food is only wasted if you don't eat it. When experiementing you ALWAYS have to eat your mistakes.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by otherstuff1957
    but it's really amazing how bad most western food in Thailand is!
    I quite agree, I find about half the supposedly euro type restaurants are extremely disapointing.

    Although I should mention the english style pies and pasties here in Pattaya, there are about 6 English people making and selling them here, these are to a better standard than most mass produced pies in the UK, ie better meat, no gristle etc etc etc, anyway I am off to Malaysia next month so it is loads of curry and loads of lamb for me

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by otherstuff1957
    Once in a while my wife cooks spaghetti or lasagna or cheesburgers and homefries. I don't need food like that every night, but a couple of times a month it really hits the spot! A little off topic, but it's really amazing how bad most western food in Thailand is!
    Hell, it aint off topic, we are talking about eating Western food. Personally, I eat my food I grew up with about 4 nights per week.

    It is funny, my daughter prefers my cooking but will eat her mother's upcountry food. The wife often yells that since the daughter is 1/2 Thai she should eat more spicy food.

    My reply? The Thai 1/2 occupies the lower 1/2 of the body...

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by hillbilly
    Hell, it aint off topic, we are talking about eating Western food. Personally, I eat my food I grew up with about 4 nights per week. It is funny, my daughter prefers my cooking but will eat her mother's upcountry food. The wife often yells that since the daughter is 1/2 Thai she should eat more spicy food. My reply? The Thai 1/2 occupies the lower 1/2 of the body...


    That is exactly the same as at my house mate. Same explanation as well. But one of mine likes spicy the other doesnt. But they both eat a lot of cracked black pepper as they grew up on it and didnt ever really know how much I was putting in.

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