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  1. #1
    Thailand Expat David48atTD's Avatar
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    Cracking Pork Crackling

    Cooking Ability - Bachelor
    Time to prepare - Friggin' Days!



    Sure, you can buy this in bags and yes, it's a multi-step process but ...

    Each step doesn't take long and, if done correctly, Cracking Pork Crackling.

    You can add any flavourings you wish, but I'll show the basic style and you can suggest some add-ons which you like.

    This is my first shot at making them. The hand of my Thai Partner was firmly on my shoulder for this one


    1/ Starting with ...



    That packet has three sheets, folded.


    2/ On the cutting board it looks like ...





    3/ Trim the sheets to a size for your saucepan






    4/ In the saucepan
    Just water and a couple of level teaspoons of salt and cook on Simmer for 30m mins, give or take.





    5/ Remove from the saucepan, drain and cut into the strip sizes you want.




    6/ Place in an area to reduce the moisture.
    We put ours out in the sun, off the ground.
    The material you see is some shade cloth.



    Cover over



    Now if the sun is very strong you might leave it outside for 2 days (in Thailand you probably bring it in overnight.

    The more transparent the skin/fat becomes the more 'bubble' you get when you fry it.


    7/

    Remove the cover, bring inside.




    8/ If it's been outside for a few days in the belting Sun, no need for the oven.
    We are Winter in the West ATM so into a low heat oven set 100C for an hour or two.
    It's sort of a feel thing how long to have it in the Oven. We were a touch over an hour with this batch.

    Imagine them on a tray in the Oven ... I forgot to take a photo ... I think the Footie was on



    ^ Notice the colour change from before in photo # 5


    9/

    We use the wok. Soak them in the oil of your choice overnight.
    We use Rice Bran Oil for the majority of our cooking.




    10/

    If you have a huge wok you can maybe cook them all at once, but we are limited and cook them on a high/highish heat in batches.
    If the oil isn't hot enough, the crackling won't bubble.




    11/ Will depend on what oil you use, the heat etc so no timing for the frying.
    Cook them till they look like this ...




    12/ Remove, drain and, for the health conscious place on some grease/oil absorbent paper.



    This is the look you want ...






    I love them, the kids love them ... they don't last long round these parts.
    Enjoy

    “Someone is sitting in the shade today because someone planted a tree a long time ago”

    .

  2. #2
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    They look fantastic but damned if I'll go through all that to get good pork scratchings!

    Suppose if living somewhere only selling pig skins for light weights in a bag, I'd have to learn.

    In Thailand and in my home state of Georgia, it's too easy and cheap to buy fresh cooked ones from a vendor or BBQ restaurant.




    Did you make some nam prick to go with them?

  3. #3
    Thailand Expat
    chassamui's Avatar
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    Years ago, in the days of proper pork butchers, you could buy a bag of pork scraps direct from the butchers. Already cooked with fat on. Delicious.

  4. #4
    hangin' around cyrille's Avatar
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    Fuck me that looks good.

    Thing is, I don't think I'll ever be able to eat the stuff again without nam prik noom.

    Just made for each other.

    I love this town.

  5. #5
    Thailand Expat David48atTD's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by misskit View Post
    Did you make some nam prick to go with them?
    Thanks for the compliment.

    We import (on a domestic level) among other things, freeze dried durian and nam pik, so no need to make that.
    Mind you we have enough chilies and lemon grass growing in the back yard to supply 1/2 of Thailand
    .

  6. #6
    Thailand Expat HermantheGerman's Avatar
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    Looks good. I tried it once but it didn't turn out as good as yours.

  7. #7
    Utopian Expat
    Chittychangchang's Avatar
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    Nice work, i could eat that right now

  8. #8
    Thailand Expat
    Humbert's Avatar
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    Sow Stall Free pork cracklings. Yum!

  9. #9
    Thailand Expat Pragmatic's Avatar
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    Good thread David. Unfortunately you do the American version. No flavour.

    The British Pork Scratching.



    I prefer to do my pork scratchings by buying the fresh cleaned skins from Macro. Dice them into 1 inch pieces. Put in a deep pan on a high heat with a little salt. Keep stirring and the fat will liquefy and eventually cover the moo skin pieces. They then deep fry themselves to the level you like them.
    Remove the cubes from the pan and let them cool before sprinkling with salt. The liquid residue can also be left to cool and be used as cooking oil.






    Types of Pork Scratching
    There are really 3 main types of scratching, with a few variations distinct from these 3 types.

    Firstly, we have the tradional pork scratching. The skin can be of varying hardness, usually with a crust, which may have a chunk of crispy meat still attached.
    Pork Scratching
    Secondly, the pork crunch, what the Americans would call pork rind. This is puffy, dry and easier on the teeth than the traditional.
    Pork rind
    Thirdly, there's something that looks like multi-layered, flakey, pressed crackling, with the fat layers squeezed out. Rarely seen in the UK these days, it is sometimes available in Spain as llardons. It is easily broken and not hard.
    Spanish Llardon
    In addition to these, there are some variations:
    British crackling or pork crackle is crispier than the traditional scratching, with a thinner, more brittle skin layer. Spain has a number of types which tend to be drier than the traditional scratching, with a skin layer closer in texture to the puffier pork crunch or only allowed to puff slightly more than the traditional British scratching, eg, the chicharrito, on which can be seen the puffed skin layer and dried crust:
    Spanish Chicharrito
    http://www.porkscratchingworld.com/Scratchings.html
    Last edited by Pragmatic; 21-07-2017 at 07:10 AM.

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