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  1. #1
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    Artisan Bread Making

    Recently I have started making bread following the techniques set forth in the book 'Flour, Yeast, Water, Salt'. My kids in the US got me going on this, they are both terrific bakers. In Thailand it's a bit challenging for me since I have only a counter top oven and some of the equipment is hard to find, for example proofing baskets and Dutch ovens. The bread I'm making is in a loaf pan instead of Dutch oven for now but it's still turning out great. I have adapted some of the recipes. The book's recipes are not available online but there are some recipes that are very similar available - I have included a link to Hummingbird High that follows the basic concepts.

    The book:



    The recipes:


    Overnight Artisan Bread at Home - hummingbird high || a desserts and baking blog

    My bread:

    This post has not been authorized by the TeakDoor censorship committee.

  2. #2
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    Looks good Humbert..where I come from, that would cost you about $12..plus.
    Can't beat the taste of freshly baked bread..thanks

  3. #3
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    Those no-kneed breads are great. So easy to make.

    I have an old dutch oven brought over from the US, which makes nice round loaves with crispy crusts when used in the regular oven. Cooking in a loaf pan makes a nice bread also, but can't get the crackly crust. Same for baguettes, no crispy crust because they don't fit in the dutch oven.

    It isn't clear to me why the dutch oven is needed to get the good crust. Maybe because it holds water vapor better than an oven alone or because it gets hotter and holds the temperature more even than the oven alone.

    The oven I use is one of those rinky-dink things from the local gas shop bought years ago. It has no automatic thermometer nor is it self cleaning. Works just fine for baking bread. It will get hot enough for pizza also, but only if a baking stone is used.
    Last edited by misskit; 02-07-2016 at 08:17 AM.

  4. #4
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    I bought an all singing and dancing Kenwood bread machine about 18 months ago. It's got about a years worth of dust on it now.

    Not being able to rise to the occasion really gets a man down.

  5. #5
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    Dutch ovens are hard to find here, but how about this?



    No Knead Bread, Baked in a Flower Pot

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by misskit View Post
    Dutch ovens are hard to find here, but how about this?



    No Knead Bread, Baked in a Flower Pot
    I think that would work. I am using an aluminum foil cover for the first half hour of baking now and then 20 mins of baking uncovered to crisp up the top. I might be able to get a dutch oven at Central or Verasu. Will check it out next time I'm in Bangkok.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kurgen
    I bought an all singing and dancing Kenwood bread machine about 18 months ago
    Don't bother with it. The artisan method makes much better bread.

  8. #8
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Humbert
    I am using an aluminum foil cover for the first half hour of baking now and then 20 mins of baking uncovered
    Doh! Why didn't I think of that? Will give it a go to see if I can turn out some Makro-style crunchy baguettes. It's the same cover/uncover method as a dutch oven.

  9. #9
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    When I was in Atlanta recently I picked up some really good stone ground whole wheat flour at the farmer's market in Decatur. I am mixing it with a locally sourced unbleached bread flour at a 20/80 ratio.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kurgen View Post
    I bought an all singing and dancing Kenwood bread machine about 18 months ago. It's got about a years worth of dust on it now.

    Not being able to rise to the occasion really gets a man down.

    Can you give some more info on that bread machine, where you bought it from and how much. I can't fine one anywhere here in Thailand.

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    ENT
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    Quote Originally Posted by misskit View Post
    It isn't clear to me why the dutch oven is needed to get the good crust. Maybe because it holds water vapor better than an oven alone or because it gets hotter and holds the temperature more even than the oven alone.
    A dutch oven does just that, keeps the moisture content better and the heat even.

    I used to bake the daily bread in a large tripod camp oven (dutch oven) over hot coals with more hot coals shovelled on top of the lid, no flames allowed.

    Perfect every time, no burned or soggy crust ever, as long as the breeze didn't cool down one side of the oven.

  12. #12
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    I'm confused. Are you claiming you are an Artisan or that the bread is good at something.

    Don't you mean Homemade bread?

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by VocalNeal
    Don't you mean Homemade bread?
    It's referred to as artisan bread because of the techniques used that produce a high quality, unique end product. Are you quibbling about the terminology I used?

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    Quote Originally Posted by VocalNeal View Post
    I'm confused. Are you claiming you are an Artisan or that the bread is good at something.

    Don't you mean Homemade bread?
    That's what we used to call it, until the ghey 'entrepreneurs' got in and called themselves artisans instead of bakers and sous chef instead of salad hand.

    Now we're gonna see 'boutique' bread.....sounds like sh *t in a frock.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Humbert View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by VocalNeal
    Don't you mean Homemade bread?
    It's referred to as artisan bread because of the techniques used that produce a high quality, unique end product. Are you quibbling about the terminology I used?
    Much as I applaud your efforts, Humbert, there is no art in breadmaking, it's a skill and at it's acme, a craft, but not an art in any sense of the word.

    PS. Prostitutes, courtesans and portrait painters are artisans, by definition.

    If it comes to it, anything hand crafted is an artefact, so yes, made by an craftsman/woman or artisan.

    So pancakes are thus also made by artisans, as is pad thai.

    Whatever.

    But would you call exquisite home-made bread using the "best" recipe available made in a bench top electric machine, artisan bread?

  16. #16
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    ar·ti·san


    /ˈärdəzən/


    noun

    noun: artisan; plural noun: artisans

    a worker in a skilled trade, especially one that involves making things by hand.

    synonyms: craftsman, craftswoman, craftsperson; More
    skilled worker, technician;

    •(of food or drink) made in a traditional or non-mechanized way using high-quality ingredients.
    "local artisan cheeses"

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by ENT
    Much as I applaud your efforts, Humbert, there is no art in breadmaking, it's a skill and at it's acme, a craft, but not an art in any sense of the word.

    PS. Prostitutes, courtesans and portrait painters are artisans, by definition.
    Take it up with the complaint department.

  18. #18
    ENT
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    No complaints mate, just arguing about the bastardization of the English language by promoters.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Humbert View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by VocalNeal
    Don't you mean Homemade bread?
    Are you quibbling about the terminology I used?
    Exactly. What is wrong with the term homemade bread if you are making it at home?
    Or are you claiming some sort of expertise based on training or education in which case you would be a baker, but still making bread at home.

    Sorry just another example of what in F1 used to be called "Ron Dennis Speak"
    So words that an imbued with a particular meaning unrelated to their original meaning.  Same sort of thing happens with expressions like "value proposition" and other business speak.

    Artisan bread sounds like something one is expected to pay double the going price at a farmer's market where none of the traders are actually farmers.
    Better to think inside the pub, than outside the box?
    I apologize if any offence was caused. unless it was intended.
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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by ENT
    No complaints mate, just arguing about the bastardization of the English language by promoters.
    The horses are already out of the barn. Artisan beers, artisan cheeses etc. have taken hold in a big way in most civilized places. I have no qualms at all with a younger generation of entrepreneurs marketing their products by trying to differentiate themselves from their more pedestrian, aging competitors.

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    Quote Originally Posted by misskit View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Humbert
    I am using an aluminum foil cover for the first half hour of baking now and then 20 mins of baking uncovered
    Doh! Why didn't I think of that? Will give it a go to see if I can turn out some Makro-style crunchy baguettes. It's the same cover/uncover method as a dutch oven.
    I've never seen or eaten a real French style baguette in Asia, except in Pai, Thailand, where a Japanese lady Naomi makes the best I've ever had.

    The local French expats buyout her stock every day.

    A tough, yet springy crust and dense well baked dough, the kind of baguette you have to tear apart before dipping in olive oil.

    In Cambodia or Laos, the only baguettes available are nappy-bread rolls, called baguettes, which they're not, thy're crusty white bread rolls, only, more akin to a French bread roll than a baguette, or barruet.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by VocalNeal
    Exactly. What is wrong with the term homemade bread if you are making it at home?
    Tell you what, when you start a column about bread, you can call it homemade bread. If you just want to sidetrack the discussion to rant about your personal disatisfaction with semantics that's actually very petty in my opinion.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Humbert View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by ENT
    No complaints mate, just arguing about the bastardization of the English language by promoters.
    The horses are already out of the barn. Artisan beers, artisan cheeses etc. have taken hold in a big way in most civilized places. I have no qualms at all with a younger generation of entrepreneurs marketing their products by trying to differentiate themselves from their more pedestrian, aging competitors.
    You forget that bread recipes are ancient, not something some ghey in a village invented last year.
    Same as cheese making or brewing beer.

    Sure, US, especially, loves to hype things up, make it sound more than it really is.

    By the way, there are a lot of older generation folk out there in the culinary market place, not as in yer face as younger sprouts are with their attention demanding promotions, but they're there, and making good homemade bread, cheeses and homebrewed beers and wines.

    Call some of them 'artisans' and they'd look at ya funny like.

  24. #24
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    ^ Makro Mae Rim has real baguettes and croissants. Other Makros have "baguettes" with the watery white crusts. Guess it has to do with who is doing the baking.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Humbert View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by VocalNeal
    Exactly. What is wrong with the term homemade bread if you are making it at home?
    Tell you what, when you start a column about bread, you can call it homemade bread. If you just want to sidetrack the discussion to rant about your personal disatisfaction with semantics that's actually very petty in my opinion.
    Totally... trolling a thread about bread..? Please get a life and move on.

    Nice thread Humbert... being a bit of an Artisan myself I have no quibbles over the use of the term and being as it is in common usage for rustic home style bread I think its apt in this case... could do with more pictures of bread though
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